Education

Dr. George Ash, Chair

Dr. Mary Kathryn McVey

Dr. Susan Poyo

Dr. Megan Reister

Dr. Rebecca Rook

Dr. Emily Sobeck

Conceptual Framework:

“Christian Educators Learning, Serving, and Leading in 21st Century Schools” (CAEP accredited 2010; ODE accredited)

University’s Mission and Vision

Franciscan University of Steubenville is a coeducational, Catholic institution of higher education that is fully committed to the intellectual development of students within the context of a liberal arts program. The Franciscan University Mission Statement states “the purpose of the University is to further the higher education of men and women through programs of liberal, professional, and pre-professional studies leading to the conferral of the baccalaureate and master degrees in arts and sciences” (Analysis of By Laws: Institutional Report, 2006, p. 7). Franciscan University offers young men and women a solid education in the context of a faith community and is publicly identified as a Catholic and Franciscan University. It is committed to promoting moral, spiritual and religious values in its students. The University By Laws state that it is guided by the example and teaching of St. Francis of Assisi with a commitment to creating a Catholic culture where faith is evident and a deeper conversion to the person of Christ is encouraged.

Franciscan University places primary emphasis on teaching excellence and on the intellectual development of its students. Further, in its Mission Statement, Program Policies: III, C Outreach (pp. 18-19), the University states its commitment to making education available to minorities, those in financial need, and to those in the Steubenville area. Moreover, the University believes its mission extends beyond the matriculated student to the evangelization and spiritual development of youth and adults through its Christian Outreach Office.

In a draft of the Mission Goals dated September 27, 2007, the Dean of Academic Affairs submitted a document stating that Franciscan University students should be able:

[To] understand more deeply the truth that only in the mystery of the incarnate Word does the mystery of man take on light and that Christ, the final Adam, by the revelation of the mystery of the Father and His love, fully reveals man to man himself and make his supreme calling clear….To understand how the norm of human activity relates (or ought to relate) to the lessons in course[s] and program[s]. The norm of human activity to this: that in accord with the divine plan and will, it harmonize with the genuine good of the human race, and that it allow men as individuals and as members of society to pursue their vocation and fulfill it (Bonilla, Max Updated draft 9/27/07, Unpublished Mission Goals Draft).

Franciscan University is working to realize the magnanimous vision of the document Ex Corde Ecclesiae issued by St. Pope Paul II (1990) meaning “from the heart of the Church” (p. 4) in which the University is “being the dynamic link between Church and culture, Gospel and work”(p.1).

In addition, the University’s Vision Statement is consistent with its mission. This statement reflects the vision that has been entrusted to Franciscan University of Steubenville:

Ever mindful of the spirit of St. Francis of Assisi, Franciscan University of Steubenville takes to heart the divine call directing Francis to “rebuild my Church.” Franciscan University fulfills this mandate by educating and forming men and women of hope to be a transforming presence in the Church and the world. Franciscan offers a dynamic Catholic curriculum integrating faith and reason, in an environment in which students, faculty, and staff seek ongoing personal conversion to the Holy Spirit (University catalog, 2005).

The Professional Teacher Education Unit’s Mission and Vision

The Education Department at Franciscan University of Steubenville’s Vision Statement of “Christian Educators Learning, Serving, and Leading” concurs with Pope Paul VI’s Declaration on Christian Education, Gravissimum Educationis (1965), of how extremely important education is in the life of man and the need for an education in which truth and love are developed together. In the document, the Sacred Ecumenical Council stressed the following principles: (1)The meaning of the universal right to an education, (2) Christian education, (3) The duties and rights of parents, (4) Moral and religious education, and (5) The importance of schools (Gravissimum Educationis, p. 1-36).

Therefore, the Education Department at Franciscan University of Steubenville strives to develop future Christian educators who have a sound sense of learning, serving, and leading, in today’s world, thus ensuring that all with whom they come in contact learn and are treated with dignity and respect. Franciscan students are expected to be ethical and moral role models with a strong value system so they may, through learning, serving, and leading, contribute to make a better world (Education Department Mission, University catalog, 2007, p. 45).

As the vision statement states, “Christian Educators Learning, Serving, and Leading,” therefore:

We are called to learn by developing intellectual habits and virtues that are integrated with the development of moral virtues.

We are called to serve by demonstrating our knowledge-based values and by understanding our Christian vocation of teaching through service.

We are called to lead because it is our obligation to embrace the role as the moral and intellectual leader in 21st century schools.

The Education Department’s Conceptual Framework Outcomes are aligned to the Standards for Ohio Educators (2007), which include the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession (OSTP) and the Ohio Standards for Principals (OSP). Outcomes are also aligned with Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) for the initial licensure program, the National Board of Professional Teacher Standards (NBPTS) for the advanced program in teaching, and Specialized Professional Association (SPA) standards for each program at the initial and advanced levels. These shared visions emphasize the importance of focusing on student achievement; using data to design instructional plans and school goals; serving; communicating and collaborating; sharing leadership and power; and providing continuous professional development (Educator Standards Board, 2007).

Unit Philosophy and Outcomes

The vision statement of “Christian Educators Learning, Serving, and Leading” supports the department’s underlying philosophy. The Education Department strives to integrate learning and moral or ethical virtues. While curriculum aims at developing candidates’ intellectual habits and virtues, the learning process is integrated with the development of moral virtues. The commitment of the integration of learning and faith is evidenced throughout the University community as Franciscan candidates learn the value and dignity of all human life.

The Education Department, in its commitment to diversity, is constantly striving to provide a program that prepares candidates to meet the challenges of the 21st century environments to which they will be exposed during their professional lives. In addition to learning the knowledge base, candidates have extensive opportunities to make application of diverse knowledge and skills in early field experiences, tutoring, and internship components of the program. Candidates, through specific teaching competencies and Christian values, provide for every student and treat their uniqueness and diversity with respect and dignity.

Learning

Initial licensure candidates in the undergraduate program have broad liberal arts knowledge in humanities, methodology in specific pedagogical courses, and multiple field and clinical experiences. According to Darling-Hammond (1998, 2006), it is the quality of the teacher in the classroom that makes a difference in student learning. It includes teacher preparation/ knowledge of teaching and learning, content and subject knowledge, field and clinical experience, and the combined set of qualifications measured by teacher licensure.

The Learning Outcomes in the Conceptual Framework for initial licensure are aligned with the INTASC standards and OSTP; advanced licensure for administrators is aligned with OSP. The department standards are aligned with INTASC standards in the initial program as candidates in the program come from a diverse geographical base and INTASC standards are common teacher educator standards throughout the United States.

Initial Licensure Learning Outcomes Aligned with Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession (OSTP) and Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC)

Learning Outcomes OSTP Goals INTASC
Ln1: Recognize and respect the uniqueness, diversity, and dignity of students. 1.4: Model respect for student’s diverse cultures, language skills and experiences. 2: Understands how children learn and develop and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, and personal development.
3: Understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.
9: Is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others, and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
Ln2: Understand and apply knowledge of content, discipline, child/adolescent development, and environment to create meaningful experiences and differentiated instruction. 1.1: Display knowledge of how students learn and of the developmental characteristics of age groups.
1.2: Understand what students know and are able to do and use this knowledge to meet the needs of all students.
1.5: Recognize characteristics of gifted students, students with disabilities, and at-risk students in order to assist in appropriate identification, instruction and intervention.
2.1: Know the content they teach and use their knowledge of content-specific concepts, assumption, and skills to plan instruction.
2.2: Understand and use content-specific instructional strategies to effectively teach the central concepts and skills of the discipline.
2.4: Understand the relationship of knowledge within the discipline to other content areas.
4.4: Apply knowledge of how students think and learn to instructional design and delivery.
4.5: Differentiate instruction to support the learning needs of all students.
1: Understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful to students.
3: Understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.
4: Understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills.
5: Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom
7: Plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.om.
Ln3: Recognize and understand the professional dispositions of organization & dependability. (dispositions)
Ln4: Communicate effectively. (University Core Goal).
3.1: Are knowledgeable about assessment types, their purposes and the data they generate.
3.2: Select, develop, and use a variety of diagnostic, formative and summative assessments.
3.3: Analyze data to monitor student progress and learning and to plan, differentiate, and modify instruction.
3.5: Involve learners in self-assessment and goal setting to address gaps between performance and potential.
8: Understands and uses formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and ensures the continuous intellectual, social, and physical development of the learner.

Serving

Donovan (2000) states, “What is of critical importance for the preservation of Catholic identity and aims is that those leaders who enter into the program recognize and embrace their role as moral, as well as intellectual leaders” (p. 442). The role of Christian educators is to lead, inform, and guide within the school setting while treating each individual with dignity and respect. In addressing the learning needs of students, the unit’s candidates are responsible for organizing learning goals for the effective instruction of all students, regardless of their needs, learning styles, interests, and abilities.

Franciscan University educational programs and curriculum provide for the integration of learning and faith not only through academic coursework, field-based experiences, and clinical experiences, but also through service in the community and campus student life activities and functions. Through three early experiences, one semester of clinical experience, and multiple field experiences connected to course work, candidates work in diverse area schools providing service to students in PreK-12 grades, in addition to participation in planned community involvement activities.

Service to the community has been a long-standing tradition of the Education Department. Examples of this rich tradition are cited in the College of Steubenville (now Franciscan University) catalog, institutional profiles, and self-studies. Our department is proud of this rich heritage and continues to stress the importance of community involvement in the program today.

Initial Licensure Serving Outcomes Aligned with OSTP and INTASC

Serving Outcomes OSTP Goals INTASC
S1: Apply strategies, methods, and techniques that will enhance instruction and learning. 4.2: Use information about students’ learning and performance to plan and deliver instruction that will close the achievement gap.
4.3: Communicate clear learning goals and explicitly link learning activities to those defined goals.
4: Understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills.
7: Plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, the community, and curriculum goals.
9: Is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others, and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
S2: Utilize various technology and materials to augment instruction. 4.7: Use resources effectively, including technology, to enhance student learning. 6: Has knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.
S3: Create meaningful assessments and evaluations to improve teaching and learning.
S4: Serve with positive dispositions that all students can learn.
S5: Serve all students fairly and establishes caring and supportive environments.
S6: Respond to community interests and needs.
S7: Apply the professional dispositions of being resourceful, caring, responsible, social/collegial, and adaptable (dispositions).
1.3: Expect that all students will achieve to their full potential. 1: Understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and can create learning experiences that make these aspects of subject matter meaningful to students.
2: Understands how children learn and develop and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, and personal development.
3: Understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners.
5: Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom.
S8: Demonstrate knowledge-based values and an understanding of the Christian vocation of teaching through service (University Core goal). 5.1: Treat all students fairly and establish an environment that is respectful, supportive, and caring.
5.2: Create an environment that is physically and emotionally safe.
2: Understands how children learn and develop and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, and personal development.
5: Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom.

Leading

Education candidates at the undergraduate and graduate levels are exposed to situations that enhance leadership skills key to developing their knowledge, skills, and dispositions. John Gardner (1986) states that, “every great leader is clearly teaching and every great teacher is leading” (p.19). It is imperative that the commonly held view that leadership is for a select few be broadened (in a democratic spirit) to include principles of collaboration. Lambert, (1998), suggests that a broader definition of school leadership recognizes that, “Leadership lies within the school not just in the chair or the principal; that the school must build its own leadership capacity if it is to stay afloat assume internal responsibility for reform, and maintain a momentum for self-renewal” (p. 3). Gardner states, “The taking of responsibility is at the heart of leadership” (p. 14).

The unit’s faculty value leadership in that they encourage in candidates’ skills and traits such as effective decision making, collaboration, problem solving, the courage to make difficult choices, and compassion for the needs of others. Candidates need these skills and traits to enhance the learning of those with whom they come in contact. Through the course work, field-based experiences, and community service at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, candidates are provided with opportunities to exercise their leadership abilities and behaviors that contribute to their growth in leading and move them to- ward established goals. The faculty views leadership as a broad concept that is embedded throughout the teacher-training program.

Murphy (1997) suggests that the above-mentioned skills and traits have not been defined as critical skills, but with school reform, the shift in the leadership paradigm is inevitable. “Like leaders of any enterprise, effective teachers recognize that they will be unable to carry out the other tasks of leadership unless they clearly understand what they want to accomplish” (DuFour & Eaker, 1998, p. 227).

In the spirit of its motto, “Christian Educators Learning, Serving, and Leading” the Education Department faculty identifies the outcomes and indicators that guide the licensure programs.

Initial Licensure Leading Outcomes Aligned with OSTP and INTASC

Leading Outcomes OSTP Goals INTASC
L1: Develop personal and professional growth through ethics, Christian values, clear communications, and critical thinking skills to impact teaching, schools, and student achievement. 6.1: Teachers communicate clearly and effectively.
7.1: Understand, uphold, and follow professional ethics, policies, and legal codes of professional conduct.
7.2: Take responsibility for engaging in continuous, purposeful professional development.
7.3: Are agents of change who seek opportunities to positively impact teaching quality, school improvements, and student achievements.
2: Understands how children learn and develop and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, and personal development.
5: Uses an understanding of individual and group motivationand behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom.
9: Is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others, and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
L2: Implement collaborative leadership skills within the school, community, and profession to support student learning. 3.4: Collaborate and communicate student progress with students, parents and colleagues.
6.2: Share responsibility with parents and caregivers to support student learning, emotional, and physical development and mental health.
6.3: Collaborate effectively with other teachers, administrators, and school and district staff.
6.4: Collaborate effectively with local community and community agencies to promote positive environment for student learning.
5: Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom.
9: Is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates the effects of his/her choices and actions on others, and who actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
L3: Motivate students to work productively and assume responsibility for their own learning.
L4: Leads by demonstrating determination, professionalism, and initiative (dispositions).
5.3: Motivate students to work productively and assume responsibility for their own learning.
5.4: Create learning situation in which students work independently, collaboratively and as a whole class.
2: Understands how children learn and develop and can provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social, and personal development.
5: Uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction in the classroom.
6: Has knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom.

Commitment to Diversity

The Education Department, in its commitment to diversity, is constantly striving to provide a program that prepares candidates to meet the challenges of the diverse environments to which they will be exposed during their professional lives. In addition to sharing a knowledge base, candidates have extensive opportunities to make application of acquired knowledge and skills in the early experience, tutoring, and internship components of the program. Candidates, through specific teaching competencies and Christian values, provide for every student and treat their uniqueness and diversity with respect and dignity.

Commitment to Technology

The Education Department faculty emphasize that technology is an integral component of all programs. Integrated throughout the curriculum, teacher candidates have the opportunity to demonstrate an understanding of the advantages of technology when utilized to enhance instruction that is developmentally appropriate and meets the diverse needs of students. Candidates use technology for professional development, inquiry, collaboration, and to design student-learning instruction and assessment. Candidates model the moral, ethical, and legal issues involved with the use of technology in order to establish a safe, effective environment.

Programs

The Department of Education offers two kinds of programs: a Degree Program and a Teacher Licensure Program. Franciscan University of Steubenville grants a Bachelor of Science degree to students who major in education. Upon successful completion of designated licensure requirements and licensure application the Education Department verifies to the Ohio Department of Education that a candidate has satisfactorily completed the licensure requirements. The licensure areas are as follows:

  • Early Childhood (Pre K–3, ages 3–8)
  • Middle Childhood (Grades 4–9, Ages 8–14; also must choose two areas of concentration from the following four areas: mathematics, language arts, science, social studies)
  • Adolescent to Young Adult (Grades 7–12, Ages 12–21 English, social studies, math, chemistry, and biology)
  • Intervention Specialist—Mild/Moderate Needs (Grades K–12, ages 5–21)
  • Dual License-Intervention Specialist, Early Childhood and Grades 4-5

Program sheets for each area of licensure can be obtained in the Admissions Office, the Education Department, or on the Education Department website (link from the University homepage.)

Provisions have been made, within the program of study for education majors to study a semester (sophomore year preferred) at the Austrian Program if desired.

MS Education 4Plus1 Program

The Department of Education offers a special arrangement for Franciscan University of Steubenville students to earn graduate credit towards Franciscan University’s MS Education program, making it possible for students to complete their BS in Education and MS Education in as little as 5 years. A total of six semester hours of graduate coursework can be completed during the undergraduate program which would count towards the MS degree. Students can then complete the MS Education degree in an online format. All students applying for the program must have a minimum 3.0 quality point average and be in the first semester of their senior year. To complete this design, students will take EDU 511 Curriculum in lieu of EDU 360 Middle School Curriculum, and will take EDU 554 Content Area Reading in lieu of EDU 320 Content Area Reading. These two graduate courses will be completed during the fall semester of the student’s senior years. The tuition for the two graduate level courses will be included as part of the normal undergraduate full-time tuition.

Due to the restructuring of the undergraduate education curriculum that is a result of this program, the first group of students who are eligible for this program are first semester juniors in the Fall 2016 semester. Interested students may contact the Director of Graduate Education or the Chair of the Education Department for further information.

Dispositions

Dispositions of undergraduate and graduate (initial licensure) students are regularly evaluated in course work and in admissions to the Teacher Education Program. A rubric with candidate dispositions is rated by faculty members and includes the dispositions of (1) organization, (2) resourceful, (3) drive and determination, (4) caring, (5) responsible, (6) dependable, (7) social/collegial, (8) adaptable, (9) initiative, (10) fair and supportive, and (11) communicative. The fair and supportive dispositions were included in reference to CAEP research that educators need to be fair and to believe that all students can learn. The disposition of communicative is extremely important to use language as a tool for communicating information and ideas, as was verified through informal research in the unit and identified as a standard and an element in Standards for Ohio Educators (2007).

Advanced teaching and licensure candidates self-assess during their Initial Advisory Meeting, at Admission to Graduate Candidacy, and upon completion of the Graduate Program. Candidates self-assess the dispositions including professional attitudes, personal behaviors, and communication skills.

Candidate Proficiencies Aligned with the Conceptual Framework Outcomes, IN- TASC, Standards for Ohio Educators, Specialized Program Associations (SPAs)

Candidates in the preparation programs, both initial and advanced licensures, at Franciscan University are required to meet national and Ohio Licensure Standards. The institutional requirements are aligned with Standards of Ohio Educator, the Pathwise/ PRAXIS III Teacher Performance Assessment Criteria, SPAs, INTASC, appropriate performance-based assessments (PBAs), as well the Outcomes in the Conceptual Framework. The programs within each licensure area identify the PBAs and reflect multiple alignments and competencies. Our Vision Statement and the core of the Conceptual Framework, Christian Educators Learning, Serving, and Leading, addresses candidates’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions, which were developed by members of the unit and the professional community. The system utilizes: (a) centrally administered assessments, (b) performance assessments aligned with SPA standards, and the (c) systematic evaluations of the Critical Dispositions throughout the program.

A Description of the System by Which Candidate Proficiencies Are Regularly Assessed

The Teacher Education Unit has an assessment system for both initial and advanced licensure programs. The following tables provide summaries of the initial and advanced assessment systems.

Candidate Assessment System for the Initial Licensure

Gates Data Collection and Evaluation to Determine Progress Link to INTASC, Standards for Ohio Educators (SOE), Ohio Department of Education (ODE), Conceptual Framework (CF), and Assessments
Gate A
Acceptance to the University
  • Completed application
  • Transcripts
  • Letters of recommendation
  • ACT or SAT scores
  • Standard 1, INTASC
    Gate B
    Acceptance to the Teacher Education Program
  • Completed application
  • 18 hours in the program
  • 2.5 GPA
  • Successful completion of PRAXIS CORE exams
  • One successful early field experience
  • Advisor’s and Department Chair’ recommendation
  • Moral character signature on application
  • Reflective essay integrating FUS and Education Department’s Mission and Vision, and licensure SPA standards
  • Allowed to take Gate B courses related to SPA and curriculum Sheet
  • Mostly positive dispositions
  • Standard 1,3,4
    Dispositions Assessment (Appendix B)
    CF, S2, Ln1, Ln2
    Mission Assessment (Appendix C)
    SPAs
    Gate C
    Acceptance to Student Teaching
  • Application to Student Teaching
  • Completion of professional/pedagogical coursework/ assessments Pre-K-3 (NAEYC), Middle Childhood (NMSA), Intervention Specialist (CEC), AYA English (NCTE), AYA Math (NCTM), AYA Social Studies (NCSS), AYA Science (NSTA)
  • Fingerprinting and background check 
  • TB test (W.VA schools only)
  • Recommendations from faculty (2)
  • GPA (2.5 minimum)
  • Handwritten essay of career goals
  • Autobiographical Sketch
  • Technology Self-evaluation
  • Attendance at Resume Writing Workshop (graduate students just submit resume to Career Planning)
  • Allowed to register for Gate C courses 
  • **Completion of Diverse Field Hours
  • SOE
    NCATE
    Institutional requirement Disposition Evaluation
    CF
    Gate D
    Capstone, Graduation Requirements, Recommendation for licensure
  • University core requirements/ minimum 124 credit hours
  • Completion of last 30 hours at FUS
  • Capstone Portfolio
  • Overall grade of C+ or better in Student Teaching
  • Successful completion of requirements as specified in initial teaching licensure application 
  • EdTPA.
  • Candidate Exit Survey
  • Successful completion of licensure assessments
  • Application for graduation Institution requirement
     INTASC and SPA Standards Capstone Portfolio Assessment 
    Assessment on SPA standards
    Passage of PRAXIS II PLT and Content Area
    ODE requirements
    CF,
    Ohio Law, TWS Assessment
     Gate E
    After Program Completion
     Employer Survey
    Unit Support for Out-of-State Licensure (if needed)
    Unit Collaboration with Education Service Center (ESC) for Entry Year Resident Educator (RESA) Preparation
     

    ** FIELD HOURS FOR DIVERSE FIELD (EDU 214) NEED TO BE IN PROCESS EACH SEMESTER

    Licensure Programs in Education

    Institutional, State and National Standards

    Good physical health, high moral character, social and emotional stability, and a cumulative quality point average of 2.5 or better are required of candidates participating in the licensure programs the department offers. Candidates must be officially accepted into the Teacher Education Program before registering for professional education courses.

    Those who fall below the requirements will be advised of their substandard performance and of the conditions under which they may or may not continue in the field. Formal acceptance into the Teacher Education Program requires a quality point average of at least 2.5. Candidates must complete an application before official acceptance can be made.

    Candidates preparing to teach in any licensure program are not automatically recommended for licensure. After completion of all University and Education Department requirements, candidates must pass the Praxis II before the licensure application can be processed. Candidates must complete BCI and FBI requirements each year as they are involved in a field experience semester.

    Admission to teaching experiences

    Special policies regarding admission, retention, and due process are maintained by the Department of Education. Candidates should consult with the departmental faculty for the details of these policies.

    Candidates must make formal application in order to be accepted into the Teacher Education Program before proceeding to professional education courses.

    Transfer students with or without degrees must earn at least 9 credit hours and complete one early experience at Franciscan University of Steubenville before they can be approved for student teaching.

    Consideration for admission to student teaching will be given only to those candidates who have an overall 2.5 quality point average at the time of application.

    Candidates must have verification of good moral character on file.

    Transportation for all field-based experiences and clinical practice is the responsibility of the student.

    Freshman education majors may apply to Student Life if interested in bringing a vehicle to campus during the freshman year.

    Educational licensure requirements and items associated with state licensure are subject to change by the Ohio State Board of Education.

    Single Assessment Institution Pass Rate Data (available on the University’s website)

    Accreditation: Franciscan University is accredited by the North Central Association, the Ohio Board of Regents, and nationally recognized by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Educators and (CAEP).

    Ohio Teacher Preparation Requirements: In 1996 the Ohio Department of Education adjusted the standards from certification to the licensure program. The standards were designed to raise the bar to establish a more effective teacher education program and to increase the rigor in the teaching program.

    • All institutions must meet CAEP standards
    • In the State of Ohio there are 50 institutions that have teacher education programs—13 public and 37 private institutions that graduate approximately 7,000 teacher education graduates annually.

    It is the students’ responsibility to research out-of-state reciprocity requirements. Advisors welcome questions pertaining to out-of-state licensure.

    Fees

    Education Department Four-Year Requirements Expenses

    Freshman Year:

    • BCI/FBI Background Check – Required for Early Field Experience I – good for one year– Yearly prices subject to change by State. If the FBI/BCI reports “may not meet” qualifications, the department will require the student to obtain the rapsheet and verification of licensure approval by ODE.

    Sophomore Year:

    • BCI/FBI Background Check – Required for Early Field Experience II – good for one year – Yearly prices subject to change by State.
    • Praxis CORE– Reading, Writing, Math Assessment – See the Educational Testing Service website (ets.org) for current fees – Fees vary depending on whether taking test by paper/pencil or by computer.

    Junior Year:

    • BCI/FBI Background Check – Required for integrated field experiences – good for one year – Yearly prices subject to change by State.
    • OAE – Subject area assessment and PLT – See the Ohio Assessments for Educators website (oh.nesinc.com) for current fees – Fees vary depending on licensure exams required. If exams are taken out of state, candidates should make sure to send scores to Franciscan University and the Ohio Department of Education when registering for the test.

    Senior Year:

    • BCI/FBI Background Check – Required for Student Teaching – good for one year – Yearly prices subject to change by State.
    • Cooperating Teacher Fee and Licensure Fee: Students registered for student teaching must pay a fee of $100 to cover the stipend for their cooperating teacher. Upon completion of the student teaching semester, students must apply for their Provisional Teaching License from the State of Ohio Department of Education. This fee must be paid in the form of a credit card. Liability insurance may also be purchased during the student teaching semester; although students have the option of waiving this insurance if covered by homeowners insurance, etc.
    • edTPA-Performance-based teacher assessment-$300.00.

    Education Course Descriptions