Courses

ACC 204 Introductory Accounting I

Is an introduction to the accounting process of analyzing, recording, summarizing, and reporting of financial data to provide information useful in the decision-making process. Topics of study include the basic accounting equation, the accounting cycle, the design and preparation of books of accounts, and the development of a set of simple financial statements, accounting for receivables and payables, inventory, and tangible operating assets.

3

ACC 205 Introductory Accounting II

Continues the focus on the accounting for proprietorships while introducing both partnerships and the corporate form of organization. Topics include the formation of the corporate organization, accounting for shareholders capital, including common and preferred stocks, and dividend determination and distributions including cash and stock dividends. Further topics include the preparation and analysis of the statement of cash flow and the accounting issues relevant to partnerships.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 204

ACC 300 Accounting Information Systems

Examines the role of the accounting information system as a component of management information systems. Text and lecture material covering data processing, the flow of information in major transaction cycles, internal accounting and data processing controls, functions of database files in the accounting process, and technological advances in accounting provide the student with an in-depth understanding of the financial processing that occurs within the accounting environment.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 204-ACC 205

ACC 301 Cost Accounting

Presents a detailed exposure to the principles of cost Accounting for products and services. The course focuses on the accountant's role in the organization, cost concepts and classification, and traditional cost accounting methods, as well as contemporary tools such as activity-based costing and just-in-time inventory methods. The fundamentals of overhead application, job order costing, and process costing are examined, as well as joint production and by-product costing and allocation of support department costs.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 204-ACC 205

ACC 302 Auditing

Develops an understanding of the role of auditor in the financial reporting process. The course focuses on the philosophy and methodology of the auditing process as well as the "hands-on" preparation of audit work papers. Audit programs, audit testing, internal control evaluation, sampling, ethics, and legal liabilities are discussed within the framework of the Statements on Auditing Standards.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 300

ACC 303 Advanced Cost Accounting

Further develops the portfolio of decision-making tools available to the cost accountant, including cost-volume-profit analysis, the activity resource usage model and relevant costing, and capital investment analysis. Budgeting, standard costing, strategic cost management, life-cycle cost management, and quality costing are also examined.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 301

ACC 304 Intermediate Accounting I

Develops the underlying accounting theories that are the logical basis for preparing meaningful financial statements. Topics include the conceptual framework of accounting theory as it relates to the nature, composition, and valuation of assets, liabilities, and equities. Other topics include the determination of revenue and expense and financial statement reporting and disclosure.

4

Prerequisites

ACC 204-ACC 205

ACC 305 Intermediate Accounting II

Continues and enhances the theoretical considerations and practical applications introduced in ACC 304. This course expounds upon such topics as the corporate form of business organization, stock transactions affecting the organization, accounting for long-term debt issues, stock option incentive plans, earnings per share, employer pension plans, operating and capital leases, accounting for income taxes, and cash flow preparation and analysis.

4

Prerequisites

ACC 304

ACC 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in accounting. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally juniors and seniors with a 3.0 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

Accounting senior standing and permission of the chair. Internships must be preapproved.

ACC 403 Advanced Accounting I

Emphasizes consolidation of parent and subsidiary financial statements. Detailed topics include inter-company transactions such as the sale of inventory, operating assets, bonds/notes payable, and leases. Additional topics include changes in the controlling interests and indirect and mutual holdings. Special emphasis is placed on the working paper techniques involved.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 304-ACC 305

ACC 404 Advanced Accounting II

Includes the study of various special topics such as partnership accounting, foreign exchange and the multi-national enterprise, insolvency, estate and trust accounting, and other current accounting topics.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 403

ACC 407 Federal Income Tax I

Provides an understanding of the basic philosophy of taxation, including its uses as a political and economic tool. The course focuses primarily on individual taxation including the determination of gross, adjusted, and taxable income; and deductions, credits, and the calculation of various individual taxes.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 204-ACC 205

ACC 408 Federal Income Tax II

Provides an understanding of special topics in individual taxation, as well as the taxation of corporations, partnerships, S-Corporations, estates, and trusts. The course also introduces tax research methodology using both printed and electronic media.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 407

ACC 409 Managerial Accounting

Is a study of techniques involved in the gathering, recording, and interpretation of accounting and statistical data used in the solution of internal management problems. The use of cost data and the interpretation of cost reports, measurement of managerial control, establishment of operating and financial standards, and construction, analysis, and interpretations of reports are analyzed.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 204- ACC 205

Cross Listed Courses

BUS 409

ACC 434 Thesis

Requires the accounting major to develop and produce a paper on a topic within the student's area of interest. This is required of all seniors majoring in accounting and written under the guidance of the accounting faculty.

1

ANT 101 Cultural Anthropology

Examines cross-cultural studies be- tween primitive as well as advanced societies. The areas covered include religious, political, and economic institutions, as well as family, child rearing, and education.

3

ANT 102 Introduction to Physical Anthropology

Is a broad-based course focusing on the races of modern man: the place of man in relation to the living primates and evolutionary principles as associated with human ecology.

3

ANT 207 Archaeology Theory

Analyzes the methods used by archaeologists to recover evidence of past cultural behavior and the theoretical orientations employed to interpret and explain this behavior. Through this course the student will gain an understanding of the nature of archaeology as a means of recreating and comprehending our cultural past.

3

ANT 208 Anthropological Linguistics

Involves the cross-cultural study of the structure, history, and function of both unwritten and written languages. Students are introduced to the methods, theories, and results of anthropological and other researchers working in the subfields of descriptive structural linguistics, historical linguistics, and sociolinguistics.

3

ANT 301 Historical Archaeology I

Follow the development of American society from the inception of colonization in the 16th century through the industrialization of the 19th century. Both courses will focus on the delineation of the cultural process operative during this time frame through an examination of the historic archaeological records.

3

ANT 302 Historical Archaeology II

Follow the development of American society from the inception of colonization in the 16th century through the industrialization of the 19th century. Both courses will focus on the delineation of the cultural process operative during this time frame through an examination of the historic archaeological records.

3

ANT 303 North American Prehistory

Presents the student with an introduction to the prehistoric archaeology of North America from the entry of man into the new world (circa 32,000 BC) to contact with Europeans in AD 1492.

3

ANT 304 Prehistory of South America

Provides an introduction to basic archaeological principles, as well as the development of the historical background of the prehistoric cultural histories of man's arrival and activities in South America. This course is designed to cover man's presence from earliest times during the Ice Age through the beginnings of the Inca Empire prior to European contact.

3

ANT 305 Biblical Archaeology

Presents an introduction to the archaeology of the Near East from the inception of urbanization (circa 5,000 BC) to the First Jewish Revolt in AD 66-70. The student will gain an understanding of the cultural factors responsible for the development of the diverse societies found in the Near East and the role of archaeology in the discovery and reconstruction of these extinct cultures.

3

ANT 307 Beginnings of Urban Civilization

Traces the history of, and subsequent development of, urban civilization. Through the use of archaeological and historical sources, students will be able to understand the beginnings of urbanization and its effect on man and his environment.

3

ANT 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in anthropology or archaeology. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally seniors with a 3.0 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

Anthropology senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be preapproved.

ANT 403 Archaeology Field School I

Introduces the basic procedures of archaeological field methodology. The program will include training in archaeological surveying, exploratory site testing, systematic ecological interpretation of site areas, basic mapping, excavation methods, data recording, stratigraphic interpretation, soil analysis, volumetric sampling, and preliminary field laboratory techniques. The course requires 80 contact hours in the field per 3 semester hours. A student may earn a maximum of 9 credit hours in Archeology Field School (I, II and III). (Only 3 credits may apply to Anthropology minor.)

3

ANT 404 Archaeology Field School II

Introduce the basic procedures of archaeological field methodology. The program will include training in archaeological surveying, exploratory site testing, systematic ecological interpretation of site areas, basic mapping, excavation methods, data recording, stratigraphic interpretation, soil analysis, volumetric sampling, and preliminary field laboratory techniques. The course requires 80 contact hours in the field per 3 semester hours. A student may earn a maximum of 9 credit hours in Archeology Field School (I, II and III). (Only 3 credits may apply to Anthropology minor.) This course is for students who are taking the archaeological field school for the second time.

3

ANT 405 Archaeology Field School III

Introduces the basic procedures of archaeological field methodology. The program will include training in archaeological surveying, exploratory site testing, systematic ecological interpretation of site areas, basic mapping, excavation methods, data recording, stratigraphic interpretation, soil analysis, volumetric sampling, and preliminary field laboratory techniques. The course requires 80 contact hours in the field per 3 semester hours. - This course is for students who are taking the archaeological field school for the third time - the maximum limit of credits (9) that can be earned. (Only 3 credits may apply to Anthropology minor.)

3

ANT 406 Archaeology Lab

Introduces the procedures and methods for classifying, sorting, and analyzing artifactual materials taken from both historic and prehistoric archaeological field sites. 6 hours of lab work per week.

3

ANT 435 Coordinating Seminar

Is required of all senior majors. Each student will meet with an advisor to discuss the senior thesis, which will be an original research project.

1

ART 106 Drawing I

Involves the study of the relationships of objective form, figure, head, still life, and landscape in quick sketches and in long studies. Media used include pencil, charcoal, ink, wash, and chalk.  Course fee: $25

3

ART 107 Drawing II

Introduces the use of color to drawing. Students explore the fundamentals of color using a variety of drawing media as a bridge to painting. Course fee: $25

3

Prerequisites

ART 106 or permission

ART 118 Painting I

Provides students with the basics of form and structure. Using transparent and opaque mediums, students will build a portfolio of work based on observation, art history, and imagination. Course fee: $25

3

ART 119 Painting II

Provides students with the basics of color and design. It is a comprehensive introduction to painting as a discipline of sight and insight. Course fee: $25

3

ART 120 Introduction to the Fine Arts

Is a survey of the development of painting, sculpture, architecture, dance, music, etc., from their beginnings to modern times.

3

ART 150 Visual Arts and the Catholic Imagination

Focuses attention on two forces: dynamic Catholic orthodoxy, as exemplified by the history of the Catholic Church and the Franciscan Movement, converging with the 'permanent things' of visual design found in the rich treasury of Catholic and classical art history. Selected images, primarily paintings, sculpture and architecture from all periods will be viewed and discussed. Additional attention will be given to images that dramatically incarnate the true, the good and the beautiful in sacred Scripture, salvation history, the life of the Church and the sacramental dimension of the Catholic Christian worldview.

3

ART 205 Art Appreciation

Is a general survey of Western art through visual and experiential approaches.

3

ART 206 ART Graphic Narrative

Is an introduction to the art studio practice of sequential narrative in the development of storyboards, concept art and illustration.  This course prepares the student to work in pre-production roles in media, bringing scripts and characters to life in visual form, as well as using the elements of design and composition to create complete works of graphic storytelling such as graphic novels, non-fiction memoirs and graphic journalism. Course fee: $25

3

ART 220 Iconography

Is an introduction to the realm of the sacred icon, including both a historical overview and a practical studio experience in icon-writing. This course provides hands-on studio experience in creating sacred visual meaning with dramatic power and clarity, using basic materials and elemental studio practices. Students learn to compose with the visual building blocks of iconographic grammar, including an understanding of the Elements and Principles of Composition and Design in sacred images. Course fee: $25

3

ART 339 Art and Humanities I: Ancient to Renaissance

Is an exploratory approach to humanities by way of considering the special role of fine art as a repository and revealer of values. The course focuses on architecture, sculpture, and painting within a chronological framework. While allowing each work to unfold its fullness, the course will underscore the ways in which art shapes the world as we know it by shaping perception.

3

ART 340 Art and Humanities II: Renaissance to Modern

Is an exploratory approach to the humanities by way of considering the special role of fine arts as a repository and revealer of values. The course focuses on architecture, sculpture, and painting within a chronological framework. While allowing each work to unfold its fullness, the course will underscore the ways in which art shapes the world as we know it by shaping perception.

3

BIO 106 Survey of Biological Science

Is designed to train students in observing biological principles involved in the organization of living things around them, including the organization of cells, inheritance, modern biotechnology, and the structure and function of living organisms. Not for credit in the Biology Major.

3

BIO 110 Human Biology

Focuses its attention completely on the human body, providing a picture of the workings and functional integration of the systems that compose the human body. The course will also provide an overview of the genetic underpinnings of the human species and the new technologies that may attempt to alter our genetic heritage. The course is intended to generate a deep respect and reverence for the human species. 3 lecture hours per week.

3

BIO 120 Introduction to Environmental Science

Is designed to provide students from a wide range of disciplines with a unified understanding of environmental issues and concerns. The primary focus is on ecological concepts (material cycles, energy in ecosystems, and population and community interactions), but the course will also examine the interdisciplinary nature of environmental science. Most environmental issues are best understood when the scientific information is integrated with historical background along with political, economic, social, ethical, and religious/philosophical implications.

3

BIO 122 General Botany

Provides a comprehensive survey, ranging from the giant redwood trees to the molds that spoil the bread or flavor the cheese to the plants that supply vitamins and antibiotics, conserve water and soil, and provide food and clothing. This course deals with what plants are and how they accomplish these things. 3 lectures and 3 laboratory hours per week.

4

BIO 123 General Zoology

Investigates the classification, functions, and relationships of animals along with their basic biological problems to survive and perpetuate their kind. 3 lectures and 3 laboratory hours per week.

4

BIO 133 Anatomy and Physiology I

Focuses on the normal structure and function of cells, tissues, skin, skeleton, and the muscular, digestive, and respiratory systems of the body. This course is designed to meet the needs of those students majoring in nursing and psychology as well as pre-physical therapy students. 3 lectures and 2 laboratory hours per week. Not for credit in Biology Major.

4

BIO 134 Anatomy and Physiology II

Is the sequel to BIO 133. It is devoted to an in-depth study of the circulatory, nervous, sensory, endocrine, excretory, and reproductive systems of the human body. This course is designed to meet the needs of those students majoring in nursing and psychology as well as pre-physical therapy students. 3 lectures and 2 laboratory hours per week. Not for credit in Biology Major.

4

Prerequisites

BIO 133

BIO 150 Nutrition and Health for Young Children

Deals with normal nutritional needs and health concerns of younger people. Topics discussed include the anatomy and physiology of the human body, hygiene, growth, basics of nutrition, nutritional disorders, immunizations, common childhood illnesses, mental health, and accidental and intentional injury. For Education Majors only.

3

BIO 203 Human Embryology

Focuses on the events from fertilization to birth. Special attention is given to the event of fertilization, the first eight weeks of development, development and function of the placenta, fetal circulation, the hormonal control of ovulation and pregnancy, parturition, anomalies of development, and infertility. Not for credit in Biology Major.

3

BIO 204 Pathophysiology

Deals with disruptions of normal physiology and with the ways and processes in which these disruptions are exhibited as symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings. 3 lectures per week. Not for credit in Biology Major.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 133- BIO 134; CHM 114

BIO 215 Nutrition

Discusses the principles of nutrition as they apply to the needs of normal persons of all ages and to the more specific needs of those individuals requiring dietary therapy. The relation of diet care to total nursing care is stressed. Emphasis is placed on the application of the principles of good nutrition in the maintenance and improvement of one's own health and that of others. This course is designated for nursing majors. Not for credit in Biology Major.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 111, CHM 110 or CHM 114

BIO 217 Medical Microbiology

Introduces nursing and allied health students to the basic concepts of microbiology, as well as the role of microorganisms in health and human disease and host immune responses to infection. 3 lectures and 4 laboratory hours per week. Not for credit in Biology Major.

4

Prerequisites

BIO 133-BIO 134; CHM 114

BIO 218 Sophomore Seminar

Is designed to teach biology majors the skills necessary to read critically and evaluate scientific literature as well as afford them the opportunity to present and discuss current biological research. Students will be expected to present a current scientific research article in a seminar setting. The course will place an emphasis on statistical interpretation of research results, as well as on evaluating the significance of a research paper within the context of a particular field of biology. One meeting per week.

1

Prerequisites

BIO 122 and BIO 123 or the equivalent

BIO 229 Developmental Anatomy

Carefully follows the progress of a fertilized egg to a completely formed frog, chick, and pig, in order to appreciate the similarities, and yet unique differences of our backboned fauna. The course fosters a heavily descriptive approach to the early beginnings of vertebrate life interspersed with significant experimental findings about the knitting together of an embryo. 3 lectures and 4 laboratory hours per week.

4

Prerequisites

BIO 123

BIO 230 Comparative Anatomy

Studies the skeletons, muscles, blood vessels, and all other body systems to gain a vast knowledge and awesome appreciation of structures found in the major groups of adult vertebrates. This rigorous course sets the anatomical groundwork for both professional and graduate schools. 3 lectures and 4 laboratory hours per week.

4

Prerequisites

BIO 123

BIO 235 Field Biology

Extends the science laboratory to the out-of-doors, permitting the student to study animals and plants as they occur in nature. Field trips are included. 1 lecture and 6 laboratory hours per week.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 122-BIO 123

BIO 236 Concepts of Ecology

Presents the key concepts and principles about the relationships between organisms and their environment. Particular emphasis is devoted to the conservation of our natural resources. This format fosters a greater appreciation and understanding of man's dependency upon other flora and fauna.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 122, BIO 123 or BIO 106

BIO 237 Tropical Marine Biology

The primary objectives of the course include the application of biological and ecological principles in a tropical marine setting. The student will understand and assess the coral reef ecosystem from the inshore mangrove hammock to the outer spur and groove reef formations of the Florida Keys. Additionally, the student will be able to compare and contrast this ecosystem with other marine ecosystems throughout the continental United States and the Caribbean basin. This instruction and investigation will include geology, botany, cell biology, ecology, animal behavior, and zoology. Finally, the student will apply lecture concepts during a five-day field experience at a residential marine science institute in the Florida Keys, which will act as the capstone experience for the course. This capstone experience will entail three intensive 16-hour days with accompanying evening programs and an investigation of the rich history and culture of the Florida Keys and Key West. 2.6 class hours per week and the accompanying field excursion.  Additional course fee.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 122 and BIO 123 (or instructor approval for non-majors)

BIO 250 Introduction to Bioinformatics

Introduces students to biological queries that can be addressed by bioinformatics methods. The course will introduce students to biological databases and bioinformatics tools used in bioinformatics research. Topics covered include theoretical and practical application of sequence database searching, sequence alignment, protein structure analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and genomics.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 122 or BIO 123

BIO 291 Genetics

Investigates the inheritance of genetic traits, which have puzzled mankind for centuries. Material covered includes Mendelian genetics, chromosome mapping, molecular structures, mutations, and significant advances in DNA and RNA studies. The laboratory component includes experiments in biotechnology emphasizing DNA sequencing, PCR, RFLP, and genetic fingerprinting.

4

Prerequisites

BIO 122 or BIO 123

BIO 301 Animal Behavior

Is the study of the mechanisms, embryology, genetics, and evolution of animal behavior. Topics include communication, territoriality, aggression, sexual reproduction, parental care, and mating systems. In-class exercises are designed to give students hands-on experience in behavioral research. 3 class hours per week.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 122 and BIO 123 (or General Biology if approved by Department)

BIO 310 Biochemistry

Deals with the chemico-physiological nature of biological systems. Relationships between the structure and functions of water and of each of the classes of biological molecules are discussed. The reactions, functions, and thermodynamics of the major metabolic pathways are also discussed in detail.

3

Prerequisites

6 credits in biology; CHM 204

BIO 320 Neurobiology Mind, Brain and Behavior

Will investigate the structure and function of the brain, and the levels of relations between neurological function and consciousness. After providing a sound foundation in brain structure end workings of neurons, higher-level mental processes such as learning, emotions and cognition will be investigated. The course will also examine how scientific knowledge of the brain's inner workings has impacted the modern world's understanding of the human person.

3

Prerequisites

2 biology courses

BIO 321 Evolution

Is designed to provide a contemporary examination of the study of evolution from a biological perspective. The course will deal with the various meanings of the term evolution, the various methods by which evolution is studied, and the conclusions about evolution that can be drawn from the evidence at hand. This course will give students a thorough understanding of the latest biological theories of evolution and equip them with the ability to intelligently discuss this controversial topic.

3

Prerequisites

2 biology courses

BIO 333 Microbiology

Studies the structural and functional characteristics of organisms that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. Consideration is given to the benefits or detriments provided by these organisms to the living world, medicine, health, industry, and our daily lives. Introduction to basic immunology is also included in this course. 3 lectures and 4 laboratory hours per week. A previous year of chemistry is recommended.

4

Prerequisites

BIO 122, BIO 123

Corequisites

CHM 203

BIO 335 Exercise Physiology

Is the study of the physiological adaptations the body makes to exercise stress. Topics include the principles of strength development, muscular and cardiorespiratory endurance development bioenergetics, energy expenditure, functions of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular and neuroendocrine systems, real function, nutrition, weight control, and body composition. Lab exercises include body composition analysis, metabolic testing (O2 and CO2 measurements at rest and during submaximal exercise), and cardiovascular kinetics during exercise (via HR and BP analysis). In addition, field-testing and submaximal cardiovascular testing for a general fitness population, basic muscular flexibility and basic muscular strength testing would be included. This course introduces the fundamental concepts necessary for the student intent on pursuing graduate studies in exercise physiology (EP) or physical therapy (PT). 3 hours lecture with lab assignments.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 133, BIO 134 or BIO 122, BIO 123

Cross Listed Courses

ESC 335

BIO 404 Special Problems in Biology

Challenges the senior biology major with a good scholastic record to pursue original investigations. Students are required to apply the scientific method to some biological problem of their own choosing. The problem and the amount of credit must be approved by the department.

variable credits

BIO 410 Immunology

Provides a detailed examination of the human immune system, combining aspects of biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, and microbiology. The function, properties, and interactions of cells, tissues, and organs comprising the immune system will be covered. Other topics studied include defense against pathogens, vaccination, and medical immunology encompassing allergies, immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, graft rejection, and cancer.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 291, CHM 204

Corequisites

BIO 426

BIO 426 Cell Physiology

Analyzes the tiny units that make up all living things. A close look and study of life at this level results in a better understanding of such phenomena as growth, movement, respiration, and related topics. 3 lectures and 4 laboratory hours per week.

4

Prerequisites

8 credits in biology; CHM 204

BIO 427 Human Physiology

Presents an understanding of the biological, chemical, and physical functioning of the human body. 3 lectures and 4 laboratory hours per week.

4

Prerequisites

BIO 230; CHM 203- CHM 204

BIO 435 Coordinating Seminar

Is designed for senior biology majors. Students select a specific topic from a general subject area taken from biology. Students are required to research and present their topic in oral and written forums. 1 meeting per week.

1

BUS 101 Introduction to Business

Familiarizes the beginning business student with the organization, structure, and operations of the various forms of business enterprise along with problems of planning, controlling, and integrating the major functions of business.

3

BUS 102 Principles of Marketing

Offers the student a general understanding of marketing concepts as related to our economic system and market environment. Emphasis is placed upon principles, trends, and applications in decision making activities.

3

BUS 205 Business Law I

Is a survey of business law. Topics included are an introduction to law, torts, criminal law, contracts, sales, real and personal property, ownership and transfer, bailments, and insurance.

3

BUS 206 Business Law II

Is a survey of business law. Topics include agency, partnership, commercial paper, negotiable instruments, business organizations, corporations, bankruptcy, suretyship, and governmental regulations.

3

BUS 215 Business Analysis

Presents the range of skills, methods, and tools deployed in planning, monitoring, analysis, using statistics, data mining and business modeling, exploring data, and the results of analysis and communication of business problems and solutions. Emphasis is on a problem-solution format to explore data analysis options and to cover best practices for delivering solutions in Excel. Students will learn to perform in-depth data analysis via pivot tables and reports, use data visualization to present data and tell impactful stories to audiences, scale to massive data volumes, and deliver analytical insights to organizations.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 212

BUS 250 International Business

Is an introduction to the field of international business. It will provide an overview of the interrelationships of global business operations and provide the general framework of international business including the cultural, political, social, legal, and economic aspects of conducting business on a global scale.

3

BUS 301 Principles of Human Resources Management

Examines the main concerns in personnel administration, sound personnel policies, and procedures. Among the topics presented are the personnel management system, meeting human resources requirements, developing effectiveness in human resources, creating a productive work environment, and providing compensation and security.

3

Prerequisites

Junior standing

BUS 305 Labor Relations

Presents the development of the union movement; the relationship between management and unions and their varying approaches to collective bargaining; the issues in collective bargaining; public policy toward labor relations; administration and interpretation of union contracts; and the settlement of labor disputes.

3

BUS 307 Principles of Organization and Management

Investigates the basic functions of management (planning, organizing, directing, and controlling) to provide a comprehensive familiarity with managerial literature, style, principles, and practices. It also encompasses evaluation of line, functional and line, and staff organizations, along with traditional and contemporary perspectives of management functions with emphasis on the systems approach.

3

Notes

Additional course fee applies.

Prerequisites

Junior standing

BUS 308 Quantitative (Management) Decision Making

Employs a mathematical and statistical approach to prototype decisions in business and economics. This provides a conceptual understanding of the role management science plays in the decision-making process. Resource allocation, queuing, competitive situations, and scheduling are considered. Some quantitative methodologies studied are linear and other mathematical programming, decision theory, and Markov analysis.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 212

BUS 309 Sales Management

Details basic principles underlying all types of selling and negotiating, together with the practical application of these principles. Principles and practices in planning, organizing, and controlling a sales force are also studied.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 102

BUS 311 Buyer Behavior

Analyzes basic understanding of buyer decision-making processes and psychological, sociological, and cultural factors that influence these processes. This provides a basis for marketing decisions leading to buyer satisfaction.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 102

BUS 315 Integrated Marketing Communications

Examines the field of marketing communications, with emphasis on optimal decision making by marketing managers related to problem-solving situations in advertising, public relations, branding, promotions, incentives, and social media.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 102

BUS 344 Integrative Experience in International Business

Seeks to enhance the student experience in the semester abroad by facilitating informed cultural awareness, enhancing appreciation of European business practices, and advancing student engagement with faculty and professionals in European businesses and governmental agencies.

3

Corequisites

BUS 355, BUS 357, and BUS 358

BUS 355 Comparative Economic Systems

Explores the macroeconomics of the global business environment, examines the factors affecting capital accumulation and economic growth and development, and considers international balance of payments, the effect that national business cycles have on international business relationships, currency exchange rate movements and their effect on international consumption, investment and unemployment rates.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201

Corequisites

BUS 344

BUS 357 Cultural Environment of Business

Addresses who is a European and looks at both past and current cultural crises and fears. The course emphasizes sensitivity to ethnic differences and promotes leadership in creating a cultural synergy and development of best practices for managing diversity in the global work culture.

3

Corequisites

BUS 344

BUS 358 International Management

Focuses on strategies for motivating, leading, and communicating with people across different countries and cultures. The course emphasizes a global perspective on hiring, training and developing employees, dealing with international labor unions, and building an effective global workforce.

3

Prerequisites

Junior standing

Corequisites

BUS 344

BUS 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in business administration. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally juniors and seniors with a 3.0 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

Business senior standing and permission of chairman. Internships must be preapproved.

BUS 404 Industrial Management

Seeks to provide an understanding of those managerial concepts and quantitative tools required in the design, operation, and control of production systems. Management, capacities, layouts, project control, job design, performance standards, forecasting, inventory, quality, and approaches to change are considered.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 101 and MTH 156

BUS 407 Corporation Finance

Focuses on the principles and practices of financing the corporate form of business. Students will learn how to analyze corporate financial needs and gain an understanding of the methods of capital formation.

3

Prerequisites

Junior standing and ACC 204- ACC 205

BUS 408 Investments

Is an introductory course dealing with financial securities, investment principles, operation of securities markets, and the selection process for various investments. The purpose of the course, in the context of portfolio management, is to give students insight into the suitability of financial securities and basic evaluative techniques.

3

Prerequisites

Junior standing

BUS 409 Managerial Accounting

Is a study of techniques involved in the gathering, recording, and interpretation of accounting and statistical data used in the solution of internal management problems. The use of cost data and the interpretation of cost reports, measurement of managerial control, establishment of operating and financial standards, and construction, analysis, and interpretations of reports are analyzed.

3

Prerequisites

ACC 204- ACC 205

Cross Listed Courses

ACC 409

BUS 413 Business and Society

Explores the relationship between the business firm and its social responsibilities to both the public and private sectors. Among the concerns presented are strategic management and social responsiveness, human investment, consumer welfare, ecology, corporate governances, and multi nationals.

3

Prerequisites

Senior standing

BUS 414 Marketing Research

Is an introduction to research methods and applications. Techniques involved in collection, tabulation, and analysis of marketing information are presented.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 102 and ECO 212

BUS 415 Public Finance

Examines the fundamental principles of government finance. This course examines four central questions: (1) When should government intervene in the economy, (2) How might government intervene, (3) What is the effect of interventions, and (4) Why do governments choose to intervene in the ways that they do?

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201- ECO 202

BUS 417 Retail Management

Examines the basic principles of retail store management, sales promotion, store location, selection and training of personnel, handling of merchandise, budgeting, control, and selling techniques.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 102

BUS 418 Global Marketing

Presents an overview of issues encountered by enterprises as they establish and maintain linkups with end users of their products and services. Screening international marketing opportunities, analyzing buyers in different cultural and political contexts, conducting research, and sustaining flows of product, two-way information, and customer service are crucial in today's global marketing environment. Strategies, control relationships, and key functions performed are considered.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 101- BUS 102

BUS 420 Strategic Management

To succeed, managers must develop the resources and capabilities needed to gain and sustain advantage in competitive markets. This course introduces the concept of strategic management through case analyses and considers the basic direction and goals of an organization, the environment (social, political, technological, economic and global factors), industry and market structure, and organizational strengths and weaknesses. The emphasis is on the development and successful implementation of strategy in different types of firms across industries. This capstone course requires development of a strategic plan as a demonstration of mastery.

3

Notes

Additional course fee applies.

Prerequisites

Senior standing

BUS 427 Intermediate Corporation Finance

Continues the study of capital formation with an emphasis on management problems related to corporate structure, cost of capital, and short-term financial planning and management, including cash, liquidity, credit, and inventory management.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 407

BUS 428 Selected Issues in Finance

In this course, finance students consider in depth a specific topic or area of finance such as portfolio analysis, options and futures markets, financial policy, cost control and analysis, financial reporting issues, principles of insurance, or other current financial problems/topics. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary.

3

Prerequisites

Permission of department

BUS 434 Senior Thesis

Is required of all students majoring in business administration. Guidance and supervision on individual research work will be provided by members of the department. For a description of the economics courses, see the catalog section designated for economics.

1

CAT 120 Introduction to Catechetics

Provides foundational material for further work in catechetics. It is comprised of a detailed study of St. Pope John Paul II's document On the Vocation and Mission of the Lay Faithful in the Church and In the World" (Christefidelis Laici) followed by an overview of topics pertinent to future catechetical ministry. Students are provided with opportunities to formally address the class and participate in on-site visitations to observe various catechetical ministries."

3

Prerequisites

THE 101

CAT 180 Art of Catechetical Speaking

Is a course that teaches students how to always present doctrine in reference to the love that never ends." Students will study basic speech communication skills, discover ways to make Scripture "come alive, and be given many opportunities to give catechetical presentations. This class is also an excellent opportunity for students who struggle with speaking anxiety. The course is graded as Pass/Fail.

3

Prerequisites

For CAT majors only.

CAT 190 Introduction to Sign Language I

Is designed to introduce students to American Sign Language. The students will develop a basic sign language vocabulary, with the ability to form simple sentences, as well as common phrases and some idioms. They will also learn about the characteristics of the deaf community in the United States.

1

Cross Listed Courses

EDU 190

CAT 191 Introduction to Sign Language II

Is a continuation of Introduction to Sign Language I. The students will add to their sign vocabulary, progressing to storytelling. In addition, students will receive an introduction to American Sign Language grammar. They will also gain a deeper knowledge of the deaf community.

1

Cross Listed Courses

EDU 191

CAT 204 Catechetics

Provides an introduction to the history, methods, and contemporary practice in catechetics. The Church's catechetical documents are studied in depth, providing the necessary foundations for the other religious courses. Catechetical skills will be developed by analyzing specific doctrines in order to learn how to handle them in catechetical presentations, determining what is essential in presenting a catechesis that is systematic and organic. In addition, the students will be introduced to the life and educational practice of St. John Bosco.

3

Prerequisites

Pre/Co-requisite: CAT 120. For CAT majors only.

Cross Listed Courses

CAT 517

CAT 207 Introduction to Music Ministry

This course examines both theoretical and practical applications for music ministry within the Catholic Church, in both liturgical and non-liturgical environments.  This hybrid course exposes the student to a wide variety of experts in the field of music ministry.  Numerous musical genres will be studied, including chants, polyphonies, hymns, and more modern expressions of praise and worship so that a student may learn to draw from the richness of the Catholic musical tradition as well as properly incorporate contemporary expressions of Christian music.

3

Prerequisites

Pre-requisites: CAT 120, MUS 107, MUS 108, MUS 109, MUS 110, and THE 418

CAT 301 Catechetical Content and Curriculum

Will specifically address the content of catechesis, the Deposit of Faith. It will explore magisterial guidance on the characteristics of the content, its integrity, organic unity, and the need for its systematic delivery. Kerygmatic catechesis will be presented as the delivery system for doctrine. The right ordering of catechetical material will be presented and exercise in the development of curricula will be provided. Finally, the process of analyzing doctrine for the purpose of delivering it more effectively will be explained and demonstrated for various individual doctrines.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 204. For CAT majors only.

CAT 302 Scriptural Foundations of Catechetics

Teaches students to see how Catholic doctrine is driven by Scripture, and how to effectively use the Bible in catechesis. Students will get a catechetical overview of Scripture and be challenged to come up with creative ways to use Scripture in different catechetical settings.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 204. For CAT majors only.

CAT 303 Catechetical Saints

Is designed to offer a deeper understanding of the content and methodology of catechesis through an historical study of saints whose lives were spent catechizing. Students will come to understand that while the method of catechesis has changed to meet the needs of the specific time, the content has remained the same. In order to fully understand this, the course will address the concept of the development of doctrine.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 204 and CAT 301. For CAT majors only.

CAT 304 The Catechumenate and the Rcia

Focuses on the restoration of the catechumenate, one of the major directives of the Second Vatican Council. This course will begin with a study of the ancient catechumenal origins of the modern RCIA. It will then look at the restoration, which resulted in the Christian initiation process of today. Using recent magisterial documents and other sources, the actual conversion process will then be examined. Finally, various special topics in the catechumenal process such as evangelization, annulments, children and teens, spiritual direction, ecumenism, and more will be discussed.

3

CAT 305 Teaching Scripture in a Catechetical Framework

Has a two-fold objective. First, the course explains the four-fold framework for teaching Scripture to conversion and biblical catechesis: 1) A Theology of Revelation, the horizontal foundation; 2) A Divine Pedagogy of Salvation History, one side of the framework rising out of the foundations; 3) The Interpretation of the Senses of Scripture, the other vertical side of the framework; 4) Theologia (Mystery) and Oikonomia (Story) the capstone of the framework, the narratio" of biblical salvation history. Second, the course teaches the skills for teaching to conversion and biblical catechesis and exercises the student in these skills."

3

CAT 310 Parish and Personal Evangelization

Studies the vision of Catholic evangelization as put forth in such encyclicals and documents as Evangelii Nuntiandi, Redemptoris Missio, and the General Directory for Catechesis, as well as other writings. Building on that vision, the class will study how to evangelize others on a personal and parish level, using the goals and objectives set forth by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops in Go and Make Disciples as a framework.

3

CAT 311 Foundations of Catholic Youth Ministry

Identifies the basic principles of ministering to youth (ages 12-18) as set forth by the National Conference of Catholic Bishop's document, Renewing the Vision." The class studies the history of the youth culture and youth ministry, especially as it pertains to the United States. Students in the class will learn about techniques for evangelizing teens, how to systematically catechize through youth ministry settings, and will review various national Catholic youth ministry programs."

3

CAT 312 Youth Ministry Methods

Provides students the opportunity to give numerous presentations and prepare actionable plans in the field of youth ministry. The class will study large and small group meetings, retreats, discussion groups, and volunteer development, as well as building a comprehensive, multi-year program for youth that would get them involved in service experiences and leadership opportunities.
3

Prerequisites

For CAT majors only

CAT 400 Catechetical Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in catechesis. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally seniors with a 3.0 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Planning and Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

3

Prerequisites

For CAT majors only. Internships must be preapproved.

CAT 401 Catechetical Methods I

Introduces principles of faith development combined with evangelization in order to encourage continuing conversion as the goal of all religious education. This course includes learning styles and methods, communication skills, lesson planning, and related techniques needed by the teacher of the faith.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 301. For CAT majors only.

CAT 402 Catechetical Methods II

Follows Catechetical Methods I and includes evaluation and use of religious education materials: textbooks, audio-visual aids, and other resources. There will be in-class applications and practice for use in all teaching ministries in the Church. In addition, a survey of the planning and administration of religious education program is provided.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 401. For CAT majors only.

CAT 405 Catechetical Ministries in the Church

Presents a survey of the elements and the content for each area of catechetical ministries in the Church, such as teaching in Catholic schools, RCIA, adult faith formation, parish catechetical programs, youth ministry, campus ministry, and others

3

Prerequisites

CAT 401. For CAT major only.

CAT 410 Professional Leadership in Youth Ministry

Is focused on preparing a student for full-time professional work in the field of youth ministry. In addition to developing deeper insight into ways of ministering to youth (based on the principles studied in Youth Ministry I Foundations of Catholic Youth Ministry ), this course also looks at recruiting and developing volunteers, dealing with teens in crisis situations, and the common challenges youth ministers face when working in parish and diocesan environments. Enrollment is restricted to students in the Youth Ministry Concentration.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 310 and CAT 311. For CAT majors in the Youth Ministry Concentration only.

CAT 412 Youth Ministry Internship

Is an opportunity for students to experience the many facets of full-time professional youth ministry and discern whether or not this ministry is right for them. Students are required to do a six-week internship at a Catholic parish that has a full-time youth minister and an active youth ministry program.

3

Prerequisites

For CAT majors only.

CAT 415 Management and Administration in the Parish and Diocese

Is designed to be proximate preparation for entry into the professional catechetical field. This course will be a survey of administrative, management, personal and public relations, leadership, policy, legal, and professional development topics from a Gospel perspective for the purpose of facilitating a successful transition to a parish or diocesan position within the Church.

3

Prerequisites

Senior status

CAT 420 Catechetics Practicum

Is designed to assist students in the proximate preparation for entrance into the professional catechetical field. This class meets once a week for discussion and practical application (doctrinal and pastoral) of the theoretical content and methods learned in the theology and catechetics courses. The majority of the credit hours are earned through the assigned catechetical fieldwork. This course will expose students to actual catechetical opportunities in local Catholic schools and parish based ministries such as PSR, junior high and high school youth group, RCIA and other adult education opportunities.

2

Prerequisites

CAT 401

CAT 430 Teaching in a Catholic School

Will apply the principles of catechesis specifically to the high school classroom setting. Students will learn to teach for understanding of the Mystery of Christ and for conversion to the person of Christ through discussion and practical assignments related to the following topics: (1) The Church's vision of the mission of a Catholic school; (2) Crafting lesson plans, assignments, and tests, for students of varied abilities and learning styles; (3) Developing classroom management policies and procedures; (4) Navigating relationships with students, parents, faculty, administration and parish/diocese.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 204

CAT 434 Senior Thesis or Seminar

Is the capstone experience for the CAT major. Students may choose between doing a scholarly thesis paper on a catechetical topic, or doing an in-depth catechetical presentation. This paper/presentation should be reflective of the particular field of catechetics in which the student would like to do ministry.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 401

CAT 435 Senior Thesis or Seminar

Is the capstone experience for the CAT major. Students may choose between doing a scholarly thesis paper on a catechetical topic, or doing an in-depth catechetical presentation. This paper/presentation should be reflective of the particular field of catechetics in which the student would like to do ministry.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 401

CHM 105 Pollution of the Environment

Considers the problems of a technical society: air pollution, water pollution, greenhouse effect, acid rain, radon contamination, and ozone shield depletion. The fundamental chemistry and physics necessary for understanding these problems will be presented on a level appropriate for the non-science major.

3

CHM 110 Chemistry with Biological and Medical Applications

Provides foundational chemical concepts particularly pertinent to students pursuing careers in nursing and in middle childhood education. Topics include matter, measurements, atoms, bonds, moles, solids/liquids/gases, solutions, reactions, acids/bases/salts, and nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work reinforces and applies lecture material and includes computer-based data acquisition and analysis. Three lecture and one 3-hour laboratory periods per week.

3

Corequisites

For pre nursing and middle childhood education students: CHM 115

CHM 111 General Chemistry I

Provides science majors, pre-engineering students, and education majors seeking adolescent/young adult licensure with a comprehensive study of matter, its interactions, and its transformations. This is the first course of a two-course sequence covering the most fundamental concepts and theories of chemistry. Topics covered in this course are measurement and uncertainty, properties and classification of matter, atomic structure, the periodic table and periodic properties of the elements, molecular structure, ionic and covalent bonding, properties of gases, and basic chemical calculations. Three lecture periods per week.

3

Corequisites

Co-requisite for science majors and for pre-engineering and pre-professional students: CHM 116

CHM 112 General Chemistry II

Is the second course of a two-course sequence covering the most fundamental concepts and theories of chemistry. Topics include aqueous solutions, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, chemical thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. Three lecture periods per week.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 111

CHM 114 Introductory Physiological Chemistry

Offers a survey of organic chemistry followed by an introduction to biochemistry within the context of human physiology. Topics include saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amines, amides, carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. This course is essential for students in the allied health fields, who require a background in the chemistry of the human body. Three lecture periods per week.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 110 & CHM 115 or CHM 111 & CHM 116

Corequisites

For pre-nursing majors: CHM 118

CHM 115 Chemistry with Biological and Medical Applications Laboratory

Reinforces and applies CHM 110 lecture material and includes computer-based data acquisition and analysis. One 3-hour laboratory period per week.

1

Corequisites

CHM 110

CHM 116 General Chemistry Laboratory I

Provides a hands-on exploration of the theories and laws studied in CHM 111, with an emphasis on the scientific method. One 3-hour laboratory period per week.

1

Prerequisites

CHM 111 (may be taken concurrently)

CHM 117 General Chemistry Laboratory II

Provides a hands-on exploration of the theories and laws studied in CHM 112, with an emphasis on the scientific method. One 3-hour laboratory period per week.

1

Prerequisites

CHM 112 (may be taken concurrently), CHM 116

CHM 118 Introductory Physiological Chemistry Laboratory

Reinforces and applies CHM 114 lecture material and includes computer-based data acquisition. One 3-hour laboratory period per week.

1

Corequisites

CHM 114

CHM 203 Organic Chemistry I

Provides science majors and pre-professional students with a foundational study of organic chemistry. This is the first course of a two-course series covering the most fundamental concepts, reactions, and mechanisms involved in the understanding and practice of organic chemistry. Topics include alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, structure, properties, nomenclature, conformations, isomers, stereo- chemistry, chirality, resonance, reactions, polymerizations, synthesis, carbocations, radicals, mechanisms, thermodynamics, and spectroscopic techniques. Three lecture periods per week.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 112

CHM 204 Organic Chemistry II

Is the second course of a two-course sequence covering the most fundamental concepts, reactions, and mechanisms involved in the understanding and practice of organic chemistry. Topics include conjugation, alkadienes, organometallics, alcohols, phenols, thiols, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, enols, enolates, carboxylic acids and derivatives, esters, ester enolates, amines, and biochemically important organic molecules. Three lecture periods per week.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 203

CHM 205 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

Provides practical applications, in the form of experiments, of many of the most important concepts taught in the corresponding lecture course. Experiments include physical properties, spectroscopy, acid-base chemistry, addition and elimination reactions, chiral resolutions, and electrophilic aromatic substitutions. One 4-hour laboratory per week.

1

Prerequisites

CHM 116, CHM 203 (may be taken concurrently)

CHM 206 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Provides practical applications, in the form of experiments, of many of the most important concepts taught in the corresponding lecture course. Experiments include reductions, oxidations, qualitative tests, Grignard, aldol, and Michael reactions, Fischer esterification multi-step synthesis, and original design chemistry. One 4-hour laboratory per week.

1

Prerequisites

CHM 204 (may be taken concurrently), CHM 205

CHM 213 Inorganic Chemistry

Expands on concepts introduced in General Chemistry to examine the chemistry of all elements, with an emphasis on the transition metals and solid state chemistry.  Topics include the crystalline state, symmetry, coordination chemistry, molecular orbital theory, and nuclear chemistry.

3

Prerequisites

Pre-requisite: CHM 112

CHM 225 Quantitative Analysis

Introduces statistical methods as applied to laboratory data; explores theoretical and practical aspects of volumetric and gravimetric analytical procedures; and concludes with an overview of electrochemical, spectrometric, and chromatographic instrumental methods. Laboratory work develops students' skills in these areas and includes using a transducer interfaced to a computer for data acquisition and analysis. A knowledge of these theories and methods is essential to the application of chemistry in many fields. Two lecture and two 3-hour laboratory periods per week.

4

Prerequisites

MTH 161; CHM 204

CHM 321 Physical Chemistry I

Provides a mathematical treatment of chemical laws and theories, including quantum theory, atomic and molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Three lecture periods per week.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 204; MTH 265; PHY 111 or PHY 220

Corequisites

CHM 324- CHM 325

CHM 322 Physical Chemistry II

Provides a mathematical treatment of chemical laws and theories, including thermodynamics, kinetics, kinetic molecular theory, and the chemistry of solutions and surfaces. Three lecture periods per week.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 204; MTH 265; PHY 113 or PHY 222

Corequisites

CHM 324- CHM 325

CHM 324 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory

Exercises complement and reinforce the concepts covered in CHM 321. A significant part of the course involves the writing of journal-style laboratory reports. One 4-hour laboratory period per week.

1

Prerequisites

CHM 321 (may be taken concurrently); CHM 206; PHY 112 or PHY 221

CHM 325 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory

Exercises complement and reinforce the concepts covered in CHM 322. A significant part of the course involves the writing of journal-style laboratory reports. One 4-hour laboratory period per week.

1

Prerequisites

CHM 322 (may be taken concurrently); CHM 206; PHY 114 or PHY 223

CHM 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in chemistry. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally juniors and seniors with a 2.5 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Planning and Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

Chemistry senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be preapproved.

CHM 412 Instrumental Analysis

Delves into the theoretical and practical aspects of chromatographic, electrochemical, and spectrometric methods of analysis. Statistics and computer applications are also included. Two lecture and two laboratory periods per week.

4

Prerequisites

Departmental permission

CHM 414 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II

Continues the study of inorganic chemistry by focusing on main group chemistry, transition metals, lanthanides, actinides, and organometallic chemistry.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 204 or departmental permission

CHM 431 Advanced Organic Chemistry

Investigates an understanding of the reactions of organic compounds via a study of the structure of these compounds and the mechanisms of the reactions they undergo. Three lecture periods per week.

3

Prerequisites

Departmental permission

CHM 434 Chemistry Thesis

Requires the preparation of a scholarly treatise on an assigned topic in chemistry. The topic is typically the research project of CHM 437.

1

CHM 437 Special Problems in Chemistry

Provides the student with the opportunity to pursue a research project. Students will choose a research project that is of special interest to them, then conduct laboratory experiments of their own design after consultation with the chemistry faculty.

3

Prerequisites

CHM 321- CHM 322

CLA 435 The Senior Oral Examination

Is given to majors by the Classics faculty at the end of the senior year. The topics of examination will be drawn both from a reading list, which will be provided, and from the courses which the particular student has taken at FUS.

1

COM 121 Introduction to Mass Media

Is designed to help students understand the critical process of mass communication in modern life. A survey is presented of the history, functions, and responsibilities of newspapers, radio, television, and interactive media.

3

COM 122 Media and Society

Investigates issues related to the economic, technological, political, and social determinants of the character and content of mass communications and their effect on society.

3

COM 123 Catholic Worldview of Media

Challenges students to think critically about traditional and modern media. Students analyze TV, film, video games, graphic novels/comics, apps, and other media using a Catholic media framework grounded in Scripture and the magisterial documents. This course seeks to address the Church's call to engage media as channels to communicate truth, goodness, and beauty, to proclaim the media component of the Catholic heart, and contribute to the greater whole of Catholic thought and formation. It is also founded on the richness of the Franciscan themes of the incarnation (physicality and creation-awe, beauty, wonder-as pointing to the Creator), personal and communal (development of the whole human person created in the image and likeness of God), transformative (inspires toward the true, good, and beautiful), and engagement of the heart [simplicity at a profound level; God as ultimate fulfillment of our desires; Jesus Christ revealing man to himself (Gaudium et Spes 22)].

3

COM 221 Church and the Media

Examines both religious and mainstream media and their relationship to the Catholic Church. This course studies the role of the media in the world and in the Church; the Catholic Church's teachings and pastoral guidelines for both communicators and consumers of the media; and the Church's use of media in evangelization, education, and pastoral communication.

3

COM 222 Critical TV Viewing

Surveys contemporary methods of critical analysis of television in a social media environment. Using a model of criticism based on Aristotle's Rhetoric, four general areas are examined: programming genres, cultural significance of content, social viewing habits, and visual literacy. This course helps the individual develop "active viewing skills" that can be used by media producers, critics, or consumers.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 222

COM 223 Newsgathering

Focuses on the collecting of information for news stories. Content includes evaluating and using interviews, surveys, government and other documents, participant observation, field experiments, and the Internet as means of gathering information.

3

COM 242 Radio/Television Performance

Focuses on the development of performance skills for the electronic media. Students explore various broadcast and non-broadcast performance situations (radio and television commercials, news, interviews), analyze the techniques used, and then practice those techniques. Class work includes studio performance assignments with regular evaluations. Lab fee.

3

COM 243 Broadcast and Electronic Media

Explores the function and structure of radio, television, and digital communication technologies in the United States. The course includes individual and group projects designed to introduce students to digital production and distribution processes.

3

COM 254 Radio/Television Scriptwriting

Provides practical scriptwriting experience for radio and television. The process of developing scripts for a variety of broadcast applications is presented. It also covers format rules for a variety of genres including public affairs, drama, and commercials.

3

COM 261 News Reporting

Provides instruction and practice in writing basic news stories using proper language skills and news judgment. The course addresses news values, elements of a news story, and duties and responsibilities of a journalist. Students receive practice in writing various types of news stories. Lab fee.

3

COM 263 Public Affairs Reporting

Trains students to research and write about the social, political, and economic subjects that constitute public affairs. In this advanced news reporting course, students write stories about local issues and events.

3

Prerequisites

COM 261 or permission of instructor

COM 281 Graphic Design

Does the old saying "a picture speaks a thousand words" hold true? How often do you encounter images in your day? How prevalent are visual presentations in media today? How do you interpret what you see? How do others? This course addresses these and other related design issues. The premise is that visual messages have great power to communicate, inform, educate, and persuade both individuals and culture. Through hands-on exercises, research, group critiques, and discourses, students learn industry-standard graphic design applications while creating a capstone project that serves as a foundation to a personal employment portfolio.

3

Prerequisites

COM majors or permission of instructor

COM 321 Public Relations

Is an introduction to public relations as a profession of applied communications. The course analyzes public relations in its place, purpose, processes, tools, and the many publics to which it applies. Print and electronic releases, features, and graphic design are all considered.

3

COM 322 Advertising

Covers basic principles of the advertising field from various viewpoints: methods, management, and media. Research, planning, and the creative aspects of advertising are examined through class lectures, discussions, and small group and individual projects.

3

COM 325 Cinema Studies

Traces the historical development of the modern cinema. This survey course focuses on significant directors, movements, influences films and terminology. Special attention is paid to the tension between film as art and/or commerce. The course will help students identify important moral and philosophical issues raised by serious as well as entertainment films. It will also help students develop an appreciation of the artistry involved in film production. This course includes weekly screenings of significant films. 2 credits lecture; 1 credit lab.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 325

COM 326 Global Media

Examines globalization's impact on the means of communication found in countries around the world. Special emphasis is placed on European and Asian communication systems. This course addresses international regulations, technology, and issues. The effects of communication in developing countries and international religious broadcasting are also examined.

3

COM 327 Internet Communication and Web Design

It is an understatement to say that the Internet is commonplace in our age and culture. Yet, what precisely is Internet communication? How do we communicate with others through the medium and tools of the Internet? How important is web design in Internet communication? What constitutes web design? Students examine these and other related questions in this practical, hands-on course by critically thinking through, discussing, and creating media projects that communicate online.

3

Prerequisites

COM 281 or permission of the instructor

COM 328 Film Analysis and Theory

Surveys the major theories and tools utilized in the analysis of narrative, experimental, and documentary cinema, including formal analysis, semiotics, phenomenology, genre studies and related approaches. Includes screenings of significant films and application of analytical techniques.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 328

COM 329 Cinema of India

Covers the historical development of the world's largest film industry from 1896 to the present, focusing on significant directors, movements, films, terminology, and the influence of socio-cultural factors. The course highlights the tension between popular (musical) and artistic (non-musical) film. It also assists students in developing a deeper understanding of non-western modes of cinematic storytelling and culture. Includes weekly screenings. All lectures, readings, and discussions are in English. 2 credits lecture; 1 credit lab.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 329

COM 331 Mysteries in Film

Compares and contrasts filmic and literary versions of major mystery stories written by various authors, focusing on how they approach a popular fiction genre from various perspectives. Representative works, critical analysis and biographical information will all be included in the course. Other mystery genre short stories and films will be compared and contrasted. 2 credits lecture; 1 credit lab.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 331

COM 332 Science Fiction Cinema

Covers the historical development of the most innovative and influential genres of world cinema-science fiction-from 1902 to present, focusing on significant directors, movements, films, terminology, and the influence of socio-cultural factors. The course assists students in developing a deeper understanding of how sci-fi cinema has been used to forecast and promote social change, as well as warn about negative social consequences. While the best of world sci-fi cinema will be screened, all lectures, readings, and discussions are in English. 2 hour lecture; 2 hours lab

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 332

COM 341 Radio and Audio Production I

Trains students in the skills of digital radio and audio production and recording. Writing and producing radio programs, news features, dramas, and commercials are carried out through group and individual projects. Lab fee.

3

COM 342 Video Production I

Introduces studio and remote video production techniques. Cameras, audio and visual equipment, directing, scriptwriting, and graphics are also included. Work is completed through group and individual projects. Lab fee.

3

COM 343 Video Editing

Focuses on the theory and processes of digital video editing for broadcast, professional, and multimedia productions. Both aesthetic and technical principles are applied through small group and individual projects. Lab fee.

3

COM 345 Independent Digital Filmmaking

Focuses on the skills needed to create short independent digital films in both 2D and 3D-stereoscopic formats, including budgeting, scripting, location scouting, rehearsing, lighting, filming, editing, scoring, mixing, and marketing. Students will explore the relationship between cinema, culture, and society by producing a short film that makes an important statement about our world today. Students will also explore opportunities to market their films via digital technologies, contests, and the like.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 345

COM 346 Podcasting and Social Media Production

Introduces students to effective design and production of audio and video content for social media audiences. Course discussions and hands-on projects include audio and video podcasting, on-demand streaming media, and media production for mobile devices. The course provides students with the perspective and introductory skills needed to produce effective audio and video content for a range of social media applications and user environments.

3

COM 352 Radio/Television News

Explores techniques of writing, reporting, and editing news for radio and television; rewriting wire copy; shooting; and editing. Students are also introduced to ENG (Electronic News Gathering). Individual and small group projects are included. Lab fee.

3

COM 353 Television News

Focuses on the role of television news and techniques used in reporting and production. This course first examines the political, economic, and professional factors used to determine the content of local and network news programs. Students then produce, report, and edit television news stories on location and work as teams to plan, produce, and participate in full-length television news programs. Lab fee.

3

Prerequisites

COM 352 or permission of the instructor.

COM 362 Editorial Writing

Instructs students in the theory and practice of writing editorials and columns about issues facing society. The course emphasizes the important function of a free press in a democracy. Works of prominent newspaper columnists and editorial writers are also studied.

3

COM 365 Publication Design

Covers the theories and practice of graphic design, typography and page layout using electronic publishing techniques. Although newspaper design is emphasized, the skills acquired in this course can be adapted for the production of newsletters, magazines, and other forms of publication. Lab fee.

3

COM 366 Desktop Publishing

Provides instruction in the production of camera-ready graphic material on a computer. It introduces students to elementary graphic design, basic typography, and various computer resources. The course also serves as an introduction to using the layout, drawing, and image-manipulation software used by newspapers, magazines, and other publications created on computers. Lab fee.

3

COM 367 Review and Criticism Writing

Is designed to teach students to write well-researched articles about American popular culture. In this course, students apply media analysis techniques to produce opinion essays of publishable quality. To this end, students also read and assess the work of noteworthy journalists

3

COM 368 Feature Writing

Instructs students to create literary feature stories suitable for publication in newspapers and magazines. Students also will analyze a magazine and write a query letter in an attempt to publish their work.

3

COM 369 News Editing

Concentrates on the principles and practice of copy editing, newspaper style, headline writing, cutline writing, and coaching writers.

3

COM 370 Journalism Convergence

Is a course designed to introduce the student to a variety of technologies and skills needed to be a journalist of the future. Current industry practices call upon journalists to gather information, write stories and prepare/edit stories for print, online and broadcast media. This course is designed to provide students with the perspective and introductory skills of a backpack journalist, one who gathers and produces news for a variety of media.

3

COM 381 Writing for Interactive Media

How does one write non-sequentially to accommodate user-selected pathways in interactive media such as websites, educational multimedia, and video games? This course teaches students how to design interactive media proposals and scripts that involve multi-path structures and elements. Students practice industry-standard scriptwriting techniques, including storyboarding, flow-charting, multi-column formatting, and basic HTML tagging. Students also focus on creating immersive, compelling, and emotional content for presentations that change depending on which link or option a user selects.

3

COM 384 Digital Photo Compositing and Fine Art

Introduces students to the elements used by digital photographers, multimedia designers, compositors, and digital matte artists. Class/studio time comprises a combination of lectures, discussions, demonstrations, presentations, critiques, and hands-on use of multimedia hardware and software.

3

COM 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in communication arts-journalism, radio/television, multi-media. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally juniors and seniors with a 2.5 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

Communications Major, senior standing, and permission of the department chair; COM 121, COM 122, COM 243 or COM 261 and 3 more upper level elective (equivalent to a minor). Internships must be preapproved.

COM 422 Media Ethics

Is an overview of how media personnel make difficult decisions when confronted with ethical dilemmas. The course examines case studies of ethical situations in the context of classical philosophers as well as contemporary media practitioners.

3

COM 423 Mass Media Law

Focuses on laws and regulations that affect media personnel in the performance of their everyday duties. This course addresses how the law, interpretations of the law, and court rulings have changed over the years. Topics covered include the First Amendment, libel, privacy, Freedom of Information Act, free press vs. fair trial, obscenity, copyright, and regulation of broadcast and electronic media.

3

COM 432 Practicum

Provides practical experience in producing a major publication, audio, video, or multimedia project from pre-production planning through final broadcast or production. Individual and group activities are included. Lab fee.

3

COM 434 Senior Thesis

Consists of independent research on a selected topic or problem in mass communications approved by the student's advisor.

1

Prerequisites

Senior standing

COM 441 Video Production II

Emphasizes and utilizes advanced single and multiple-camera production and editing techniques. The course includes individual and small-group projects. Lab fee.

3

Prerequisites

COM 342

COM 442 Digital Multitrack Audio Production II

Emphasizes advanced techniques of digital audio production and effects, including audio post-production for video, MIDI production, live recording and reinforcement, high definition musical multitrack recording, looping, stereo and surround-sound mixing, and CD/ DVD mastering. Small group and individual projects are included. Lab fee.

3

Prerequisites

COM 341.

COM 443 Telecommunications Management

Is an overview of the electronic media from a managerial perspective. Media covered include broadcast radio/ TV, cable TV, private/corporate television, and new online and mobile technologies. The course includes organization, planning, budgeting, marketing, influence of technology, and outside factors.

3

COM 444 Advanced Digital Media Production

Provides practical experience in producing a major digital project from pre-production planning through post production. It is designed for students seeking to review, apply, and refine production skills at an advanced level. Individual and group activities are included. Lab fee.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 444

COM 463 Publication Management

Looks at the print media as a business from a managerial point of view. This course considers the impact of organizational, budgeting, marketing, and technological influences.

3

COM 464 Newspaper Production

Is an advanced course integrating skills learned in other journalism courses, simulating actual work on a newspaper, and providing a variety of reportorial experiences. Lab fee.

3

Prerequisites

COM 261, COM 365, and COM 369

COM 482 Designing Interactive Media and Animation

An overview of the field, this course provides the "big picture" for designing multimedia projects. Principles of interactive and video game development are introduced along with design documents and project proposals. Technical discussions about media technologies complement current principles covering visual design, formats, audio, video, and animation. Students create multimedia and video game graphics and an interactive project as a means of integrating course concepts.

3

Prerequisites

COM 281 or permission of the instructor

COM 484 Creating Motion Graphics and Special Effects

The processes and considerations for creating motion graphics, special effects, 2D, and 3D compositions are covered in this course. Students utilize industry-standard applications as they study and explore the methods for integrating images from multiple sources into a seamless whole, and practice various techniques for visual effects post-production.

3

Prerequisites

COM 243 and COM 281, or permission of the instructor

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 484

CSC 140 Survey of Computers

Is a thorough introduction to computers, including hardware and software concepts. Hands-on experience using micro-computer hardware and software tools is included. Elementary skills in using such computer tools as word processing, spreadsheets, database managers, and programming will be developed as time allows. Social issues involving computers will be discussed.

3

CSC 141 Introduction to Computer Science

Serves three main purposes: to develop in students an understanding of the algorithmic formulation of methods for problem solving on a computer; to train students to use at least one procedural computer language; and to acquaint students with the basic properties of computers.

3

CSC 144 Object-Oriented Programming

Serves three main purposes: to develop in the students an understanding of the principles of object-oriented programming, to introduce the student to the algorithmic methods for problem solving on the computer, and to train students to use at least one object-oriented computer language.

3

CSC 145 Data Structures

Introduces data structures such as stacks, queues, lists, trees, and graphs in an object-oriented framework. The material of this course is fundamental in the object-oriented analysis and computer solution of a wide variety of problems.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 144 or permission of instructor.

CSC 155 Computers and Instructional Technology I

Enables the student educator to master the knowledge and skills necessary tobecome an intelligent user of computers in classrooms and laboratories. Course topics include computer-aided instruction; Piaget's and Papert's learning theories in relation to computers; word processing; electronic grade books; databases; spreadsheets; telecommunications; Internet; and an introduction to multimedia. This course is for those seeking teacher licensure. Education majors only.

3

CSC 171 Applied Object-Oriented Programming

Serves three main purposes: to develop in the students an understanding of the object-oriented approaches to the algorithmic formulation of methods for problem solving on the computer; to train students to use at least one object-oriented computer language and to prepare students for applied object-oriented programming in their upper level courses.

3

CSC 205 Bioinformatics Programming

Studies the use of scripting languages and software tools for work in bioinformatics. Emphasis will be on data manipulation, file input and output, FASTA files, regular expressions and pattern matching, databases, and web programming.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 141, CSC 144, CSC 171 or CSC 280

CSC 210 Bioinformatics Algorithms

Studies the fundamental algorithms used in bioinformatics. Attention will be paid to specific algorithms (e.g. for measuring DNA similarity and for constructing phylogenic trees), to algorithm design methods (e.g. exact vs. heuristic methods, and dynamic programing) as well as to the computational costs of the various algorithms (Big-O notation, and the difference between polynomial and exponential time algorithms).

3

Prerequisites

CSC 141, CSC 144, CSC 171 or CSC 280

CSC 232 Elementary Cobol and Structured Programming

Emphasizes structured programming and problem-solving using Cobol.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 141 or equivalent

CSC 242 Advanced Cobol and File Processing

Is a continuation of the study of COBOL begun in CSC 232 and includes pseudo-code, table handling, modular programming, documentation, and other related topics. The techniques and concepts of structuring, sorting, and retrieving data on bulk storage devices are also introduced.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 232

CSC 255 Computers and Instructional Technology II

Further prepares student educators for the effective use of computers and technology in the classroom. Through this course, students will learn the basic skills needed to evaluate, design, produce, and utilize multimedia products in educational, organizational, and communications environments.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 155-Education majors only

CSC 261 Information Processing Systems

Examines the four fundamental types of data organization (sequential, direct, indexed sequential, and database management systems) and the corresponding programming and design techniques. Security, privacy, data integrity, and future trends are discussed.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 141 or CSC 144

CSC 271 Structured Systems Analysis

Studies the system development cycle with emphasis on techniques and tools, system documentation, data flow diagrams, system testing, and implementation. Students are expected to suggest, design, and implement a specific application system.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 171

CSC 280 Numerical Computing

Introduces procedural programming techniques using the programming language FORTRAN. Emphasis is placed on the analysis and design of numerical algorithms, which are useful in business and science. Other topics include file processing and parallel processing.

3

Corequisites

MTH 161

CSC 310 Programing Languages

Examines the basic concepts of programming languages: programming language processors, elementary and structured data types, subprograms, sequence control, data control, storage management, syntax and translation, and programming environments. The student will also study three different programming languages and write a short project in each.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 145

CSC 320 Genetic Algorithms

Studies the use of simulated evolution in computer science and biology. Primary emphasis will be on the use of evolutionary and genetic algorithms as tools for solving combinatorial optimization problems (including problems arising in bioinformatics). Secondary emphasis will be placed on construction of computer models designed to illuminate aspects of evolutionary theory (e.g. the computer evolution of strategies for playing the prisoner's dilemma as a model for the evolution of altruistic traits). Counts as a bioinformatics elective.

3

CSC 330 Number Theory and Cryptography

Covers the fundamental algorithms used in both private key and public key cryptography. Algorithms covered will include DES, AES, Diffie-Hellman, and RSA. Traditional encryption methods such as Vigenere ciphers and their cryptanalysis will be briefly described. The number theory needed to understand primality testing and RSA encryption will be developed in detail. Several programming projects aimed at implementing some of the material will be given throughout the semester.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 141, CSC 144, CSC 171 or CSC 280; and MTH 220

Cross Listed Courses

MTH 330

CSC 335 Junior Seminar

Is designed to teach computer science and computer information science majors the skills necessary to learn computer science on their own and communicate their knowledge to others in oral and written form. All students will attend presentations made by senior computer science students. Students will be required to write a short, independently-researched paper and present it to the other students in the junior seminar.

1

CSC 341 Networking/Telecommunications

Introduces students to the fundamentals of network and data communication technologies. Course topics include telecommunication media and equipment; data transmission and protocols; corporate, local, and wide area networks; intranets and internets; and network software and management. An introduction to electromagnetic concepts and principles is included to provide a technical foundation for these concepts.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 141 or CSC 144 or junior standing

CSC 344 Algorithm and Complexity

Will introduce concepts of algorithm analysis, strategies, time and resource complexity and basic computability.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 145 and MTH 220

CSC 351 Current Topics in Computer Information Science

Is a seminar in information resource management covering such topics as office automation, networks, distributed data processing, data integrity, and decision support systems.

3

Prerequisites

Junior standing or permission of instructor

CSC 352 Software Patterns in Object-Oriented Programming

Serves three main purposes: to develop in the students an understanding of software patterns in an object-oriented framework; to teach the students the 24 most common software patterns; and to train students to use another object-oriented computer language.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 144

CSC 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in computer science/technology. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally seniors with a 2.5 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

Computer science junior or senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be preapproved.

CSC 402 Hardware and Software Systems

Surveys the relationship be- tween hardware architecture and both systems and applications software. The influence of processor and storage system architecture on software design is also studied.

3

Prerequisites

Junior standing or permission of instructor

CSC 403 Operating Systems

Considers the structure of operating systems involving design, implementation, and maintenance. Various types of mainframe, mini, and micro operating systems will be discussed. Some systems programming will be considered.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 404

CSC 404 Computer Architecture with Assembly Language

Is an introduction to the architecture of the microprocessors and Assembly Language. Concepts in digital logic, machine level of data, the assembly level machine organization, memory system organization, interfacing and functional organization are covered. Exercises in Assembly Programming will illustrate some of these concepts.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 145 and MTH 220

CSC 405 Systems Project

Gives students an opportunity to plan and implement a significant project using previously obtained analytic and programming skills. Students will be responsible for the proposal, management, implementation, documentation, and communication of the project. Departmental guidance will be available when necessary.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 271

CSC 410 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems

Explores Artificial Intelligence (AI) within the context of special languages used in AI, such as LISP and PROLOG. Basic AI techniques presented include those needed to understand and design simple expert systems. As time permits, topics from the following areas may be investigated: natural language processing, planning, machine learning, neural networks, and various forms of reasoning.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 145 and junior standing

CSC 430 Theory of Computing

Examines the underlying mathematical models and theories that are the basis of the modern computer. Topics include grammars, types of languages, types of automata, computability, and complexity.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 220

CSC 434 Senior Thesis

Requires all computer science and computer information science students to write a thesis on an approved topic in computer science. Students must consult closely with a departmental faculty member at each stage in the development of their theses. The thesis will be presented to students in the Junior Seminar.

1

ECO 201 Principles of Economics I (Macro)

Introduction to the theory of income determination with emphasis on monetary and fiscal policies. Aggregate supply and demand analysis is presented with an emphasis on measurement and determination of national income, the price level, and the rate of economic growth. Additional topics include the objectives of full employment, price stability, economic growth, and balance of payments stability.

3

ECO 202 Principles of Economics II (Micro)

Introduction to the theory of price determination, market coordination and adjustment. Topics include: consumer demand theory, the theory of production and cost, and pricing and output decisions under competitive and noncompetitive conditions.

3

ECO 212 Fundamentals of Business Statistics

Is an introduction to concepts in statistical methods and their applications to real-world problems. The goal of the course is for students to understand fundamental statistical concepts and methods and their applications. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics, including an introduction to probability theory, correlation, and regression analysis.

3

ECO 290 Economic Theory of Games and Strategy

Is an introduction to the emerging science of strategy, the art of outdoing an adversary knowing that the adversary is trying to do the same. Subjects discussed include basic principles of strategy, prisoners' dilemma games, credibility, uncertainty, cooperation, strategic voting, auctions, bankruptcy, R&D races, cartel behavior, military and diplomatic situations, and other topics subject to the interest of students and the instructor.

3

ECO 302 Current Economic Problems

Analyzes the most important contemporary economic problems and the application of fundamental economic theories to present-day business problems.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201-ECO 202

ECO 303 Labor Economics

Presents an analysis of trends and behavior of labor supply and demand, wage levels, structures, and differentials, and their effects on production and employment. Economic principles that underlie social legislation are also studied to give the student a better perspective of labor and its place in our economic society.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201- ECO 202

ECO 321 Money and Banking

Considers the nature and functions of the monetary and banking mechanisms. Analyzing money and credit, bank regulations, the Federal Reserve System, and monetary theory are important for understanding not only the institutional structure of our money system, but how it holds together the balance of our economy.

3

ECO 341 Econometrics

Provides the student of economics with the tools needed for probabilistic and quantitative analysis of economic phenomena used in the development of theory and observation. The course introduces students to topics such as the classical linear regression model and hypothesis testing in building econometric models and simulations. Also covered are special topics such as autocorrelation, multicollinearity, heteroscedasticity, and dummy variables.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201, ECO 202, ECO 212, and MTH 156

ECO 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in economics. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally seniors. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contact can be obtained from the Career Services Office.

1-6

Prerequisites

Economics senior standing and permission of chair; Internships must be preapproved.

ECO 401 History of Economic Thought

Develops economic concepts and theories from the mercantilists to recent economists. Economic ideas and theories related to their respective places in history are constructed. Students are better able to understand the value of various theories regarding their application to the economic world.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201- ECO 202

ECO 404 Law and Economics

Applies the methods of economics to the analysis of the structure of common law, legal process, legal institution and statutory regulations to the impact of law on the behavior of individuals, groups, and the economy. Topics include the nature of economic reasoning and the economic approach to the law; property rights in economics and law; torts and tort liability; legal processes; crime and punishment; and variable topics subject to instructor and student interest.

3

Cross Listed Courses

LST 404

ECO 411 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

Is an analysis of Keynesian and neoclassical theories of consumption, investment, interest, savings, monetary, and fiscal policy. This course covers various aspects of the money and banking system, economic growth, and the international economy.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201

ECO 412 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

Is an in-depth analysis of the theory of the firm, which includes the theories of consumer behavior, market demand, production decisions, and cost combinations. Prices, output and input costs under pure competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly are also considered.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201

ECO 427 International Trade and Finance

Presents the theory of inter- national trade, the balance of payments, and the global monetary system. The first part of the course traces the development of trade theory and barriers to trade, while the second part focuses on financial markets, exchange markets, and the theory and evidence related to floating exchange rates.

3

Prerequisites

ECO 201- ECO 202

ECO 430 Economics Practicum

Provides the student with opportunities to apply theories presented in other economics courses to real world" situations. Emphasis is on application of theory, with concentration on communicating effectively in written and oral form. Topics include locating published research, writing skills in economics, theory's role in research, empirical methods, and self-directed study/research skills."

2

Prerequisites

Senior standing

Corequisites

This course runs concurrently with ECO 434.

ECO 434 Senior Thesis

Is required of all senior economics majors. The student will meet with a faculty member to discuss, plan, implement, and create an original research project.

1

Prerequisites

Senior standing

Corequisites

This course must be taken concurrently with ECO 430.

EDU 109 Early Experience I

Is a field-based experience for candidates to begin to address the competencies of the specific licensure area sought, i.e., early childhood, adolescent to young adult, or mild/moderate intervention specialist, and multi-age licensure. The ODE Curriculum Models will be used as an instructional resource. The placement in area schools (multi-cultural, ethnic, socio-economic, and culturally diverse) assists students to explore interests, define professional goals, and assess personal qualities and abilities in light of competencies deemed essential for future educators. Participatory activities include the utilization of instructional techniques, instructional materials, technology and media to maximize pupil learning. Students will be evaluated based upon successful competency completion within the licensure area being sought and the ability to plan for developmentally and culturally responsive instruction. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required. Candidate Dispositions are assessed. (60 hrs. in the classroom).

2

EDU 112 Introduction to Individuals with Disabilities

Under-scores the importance of teaming and collaboration, partnerships with parents, and the vital role of technology as an instructional tool in serving students with diverse learning and social needs. The identifications of students who require specially designed instruction, related services, and supplemental aides and services will be discussed with a Response to Instruction model. As specific social and learning characteristics of students with diverse learning needs are addressed, Principles of Universal Design of Instruction will be emphasized as a structure to plan effective ways to meet the standards-based goals of today's schools and to plan for an effective transition to adult life. This design addresses academic, physical, and social environments that can be prepared in advance to maximize access to the curriculum for all students. In addition, lifespan issues will be addressed to ensure individuals with disabilities can access post-secondary school options, employment and life in the community.

3

EDU 190 Introduction to Sign Language I

Is designed to introduce students to American Sign Language. The students will develop a basic sign language vocabulary, with the ability to form simple sentences, as well as common phrases and some idioms. Students will also learn about the characteristics of the deaf community in the United States.

1

Cross Listed Courses

CAT 190

EDU 191 Introduction to Sign Language II

Is a continuation of Introduction to Sign Language I. The students will add to their sign vocabulary, progressing to storytelling. In addition, students will receive an introduction to American Sign Language grammar. They will also gain a deeper knowledge of the deaf community.

1

Cross Listed Courses

CAT 191

EDU 208 English Language Learners in a Specialized Atmosphere (ELISA)

Provides the candidate the opportunity to teach English Language Learners (ELL) to a diverse group of students in Gaming, Austria. Candidates work with diverse faculty and staff. Students are placed by licensure area in the Kindergarten, Volksschule (ages 6-10), Hauptschule (ages 10-14), or Fachschule (ages 14-17) schools. Additionally, participation in the ELISA experience also enables candidates to tutor students who participate in the Language and Catechetical Institute for an additional 10 hours of ELL experience. The ELISA program also includes mandatory assignments aligned to the Ohio Educator Standards, INTASC, and the department Conceptual Framework for international teaching experiences; integrated with the use of technology using blogs, wiki, and Blackboard tools.

2

EDU 209 Early Experience II

Is a field-based experience for students to begin to address the competencies of the specific licensure area sought (early childhood, adolescent to young adult, or mild/moderate intervention specialist and multi-age license). It is an in-depth continuation of Early Experience I. Candidates are provided with the opportunity to study and become directly involved with curriculum materials and technology, diagnostic and prescriptive procedures, and methods of instruction that are developmentally appropriate for the licensure area sought, and to ensure increased proficiency in teaching responsibilities as outlined by the specific ODE curriculum models. Candidates will be evaluated based upon successful competency completion within the licensure area being sought, i.e., unit preparation and implementation. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required. Candidate Dispositions are assessed. (60 hours in the classroom). Candidates responsible for transportation.

2

EDU 213 Pre-Field Seminar

The one credit "pre-field" seminar enables education majors to better prepare for the challenging field experiences required in the major. The seminar consists of sessions on topics such as transportation responsibilities, traditional vs. intern field experience opportunities, required responsibilities of field experiences I and II, description of the EDU 214 field requirements, explanation of the ELISA (Gaming) program, preparation for the E-Capstone portfolio, and professional development regarding professional ethics, social media, bullying prevention, and CPR.

1

EDU 214 Field Service and Professional Development in Diverse Environments

The 50-hour service and professional development learning projects are designed to encourage pre-service educators to engage in rich and varied experiences of working with children and youth in educational and community settings that may include cultural, linguistic, socio-economic, and individual diversity. The pre-service educator can select from a broad and varied menu of activities to fulfill the 50-hour service and professional development requirement. Hours will be accumulated as fulfilling requirements of specific courses; however, the majority of hours will be awarded in fulfillment of self-selected community, school, and university service to others and professional development opportunities. In addition, the student can select a variety of ways to creatively document and verify the experience or to engage in additional research. The learning projects are designed to document the student's experience over a 4-year period of time. The awarding of 1-hour credit will occur upon the successful completion of experiences, documentation, and required assignments.

1

EDU 215 Activities/Games/Drama for the Young Child

Provides a developmental approach grounded in theory for orienting pre-service teachers to understanding and appreciating the relationship between learning, play, creativity, and development. This course emphasizes planning and implementing developmentally appropriate creative learning experiences that nurture curiosity, discovery, collaboration, and critical thinking as well as the academic disciplines. Active participation in community programs provides pre-service teachers with valuable experience in creative and arts-based teaching/ learning while building reciprocal community relationships.

3

EDU 218 Foundations of Education

Includes an overview of the place of education in society, the theoretical foundations of educational philosophy and theology, the foundations for a science of education, and the concerns of modern education, school organization, administration, and curriculum. The course will examine the influence of diversity and social issues and comparative and global education. The course examines school law. Candidates are introduced to the Conceptual Framework and Outcomes of the Education Department. (5 clinical hours).

3

EDU 300 Active Learning for Young Children in Science and Social Studies

The science and social studies content areas will be examined in light of developmentally-appropriate curriculum for young children through fifth grade. Current methodologies for teaching science and social studies will be explored. This course emphasizes inquiry learning, the engaged learner, critical thinking, collaboration, and problem solving for constructing scientific and social studies literacy. Lesson plans and integrated units will be planned and implemented as students explore constructivist curricular models, central concepts, inquiry tools, assessment approaches, and integration of the content areas for enhancing student motivation, engagement, and learning. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required.

3

EDU 305 Teaching Language Arts

Provides candidates with pedagogical knowledge and skills in the integrated language arts so they can assess, plan, and implement instruction that is developmentally appropriate to the level of all students. The course will focus on the importance of emergent literacy, language acquisition, language structure, spoken, written, and visual language, reading and literature, and the most effective instructional methods to enhance the learning for middle/adolescent grades within the language arts area. The ODE Language Arts Model will serve as an instructional resource. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required.

3

Prerequisites

Gate B

EDU 318 Child and Adolescent Literature

Introduces candidates to the various genres of child and adolescent literature, historical background, and evaluative measures for use with children from birth through adolescence. Candidates read and discuss books that have gained high acclaim as award winner or honor books and apply their knowledge across the curriculum.

3

EDU 320 Content Area Reading

The development of reading ability is the acquisition of a series of skills that is peculiar to each content area. Emphasis is placed on the theories of learning, instruction, and assessment, so that candidates understand why all teachers are teachers of reading. There is a careful assessment and evaluation of the needs and the abilities of all candidates so teachers know how to individualize for the improvement of teaching and learning. Focus will involve recognition of reading problems related to each content area in working with a diverse student population. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required. Candidate Dispositions are assessed.

3

EDU 321 Inclusive Early Childhood Education

Is built upon a foundation of developmentally-appropriate practice (DAP) and considers individualized approaches that benefit all children. Pre-service educators will gain an integrated understanding and knowledge of children's physical, social, cognitive, emotional, and communication development and the indications of disability within these developmental domains. Pre-service educators will acquire knowledge of assessment processes for child development, and for monitoring and evaluating programs for young children. Pre-service educators will be prepared to use a variety of teaching strategies and methodologies, and will be required to incorporate the use of a variety of technologies into their instructional repertoires based on Universe Design of Learning principles. Pre-service educators will learn how instructional information is incorporated into the following documents required by IDEA 2004: an individualized family service plan (IFSP); an individualized education plan (IEP), or a 504 plan of accommodations. Pre-service educators will learn to collaborate effectively with other professionals to meet the individual needs of young children and their families. Emphasis will be placed on pre-service educators learning to engage and collaborate with families based on approaches that are responsive to cultural, linguistic, and developmental diversity. Pre-service educators will complete a family project to meet CAEP and NAEYC Standard 2: Building Family and Community Relationships.

3

EDU 325 Assessment and Intervention Practices for Young Children with Mild Disabilities

Requires pre-service educators to acquire terminology used in assessment and to interpret information from formal and informal assessments to plan instruction within the three-tiered Response to Instruction Model. The legal provisions and ethical principles regarding the assessment of individuals, including those from culturally and/or linguistically diverse backgrounds, will be examined. National, state, and local accommodations and modifications to assessment and instruction will be addressed. The effects of culture and linguistic differences on growth and development of young children will be discussed in addition to the design of evidence-based interventions for children who may be at risk for learning disabilities, particularly dyslexia. Pre-service educators will apply strategies from multiple theoretical approaches to support individuals with disabilities or socio-cultural differences in the general curriculum in addition, specific characteristics of Tier 2 and Tier 3 instruction, such as progress monitoring, and specially designed instruction will be explored. Extensive use of video footage of actual classroom instruction will be used to analyze and evaluate teaching practices. This class is a component of the preparation for pre-service educators to assess and instruct students considered at risk or with disabilities in EDU 345 and EDU 346.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 344 Teaching Reading Curriculum

EDU 330 Mathematics Methods in the Early and Middle Grades

Encompasses 1) materials, methods, and content of teaching mathematics to students in the early and middle childhood (ages 3 to 14); 2) mathematics education today and into the future; 3) culturally relevant mathematics; 4) development of mathematical proficiency using learning research and assessment development theories of how children learn mathematical concepts; 5) the use of technology in problem solving situations and in understanding mathematics; 6) video vignettes modeling food teaching practices; 7) recommendations of Ohio Department of Education's Academic Content Standards and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) on the standards, performance, and assessment.

3

EDU 331 Problem Solving and Assessment in the Middle and Adolescent Grades

Uses problem solving approaches to select, apply, and translate mathematical representations to solve problems within the middle/adolescent grades. Application of manipulatives for visualizing and exploring the parameters of mathematical concepts lead to important insights and generalizations. Emphasis is placed on applying the assessment and tutoring of a student within the licensure area and upon the historical development of number and number systems, algebra, measurement, and the Euclidian and Non-Euclidian geometries including contributions from diverse cultures.

3

EDU 344 Teaching Reading

Course content includes physiological, psychological, and sociological theories underlying the development of reading proficiency and the understanding of the complex nature of reading and writing. Emphasis is placed on rationale, methods, and assessment for the instruction of phonemic, morphemic, semantic, and syntactic patterns and how these factors are interrelated. Areas of concentration include comprehension, language, readability, vocabulary development, assessment, evaluation of reading materials, instruction, and remediation. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required. (Field hours are required).

3

Prerequisites

ENG 280

EDU 345 Reading Diagnosis and Assessment

Explores formal and informal assessment as a continuing part of classroom activities in reading and writing. Candidates develop a knowledge base and pedagogical assessment skills to meet the needs of a diverse student population. Learned assessments are utilized in a weekly tutoring situation. Weekly tutoring involves initial contact with a school for tutoring arrangements, assessment, diagnosis, and implementation of a devised long term plan, weekly evaluation, weekly reflection for planning, implementing, assessing, and evaluating instruction, continuous communication with school personnel, parents, follow-up letters, and an overall reflection of involvement. Teacher education portfolios and tutee portfolios are maintained. Data that demonstrates effect on student learning is performed. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required. Candidate Dispositions are assessed. (Field hours are required).

3

Prerequisites

ENG 280 and EDU 344

EDU 346 Assessment and Interventions for Middle and High School Students with Disabilities

Is concerned with assessment and intervention strategies that assist adolescent students with disabilities such as, dyslexia attention deficient disorder, or autism spectrum disorder in achieving academic content standards. Pre-service educators will be prepared to implement evidence-based learning and executive functioning strategies for the acquisition of academic content. Pre-service educators will learn to implement evidence-based instructional practices, in particular, explicit and direct instruction. Additional topics and activities include: collaboration with professionals and families, assistive technology to support universal design for instruction, and the use of instructional data to write and monitor effective individual education plans. The transition plan component of the individual education plan (IEP) will be covered as well as Section 504 plans to prepare students for postsecondary educational and employment options. (Field hours are required.)

3

Prerequisites

EDU 344 Teaching Reading

EDU 347 Assessment and Instruction of Students with Moderate Disabilities

Encompasses the individual behavior and functioning of students with more significant learning challenges. An emphasis will be placed on using ecological assessments as a method to design interventions and to relate levels of support to the needs of the individual. Pre-service educators will acquire skills in applied behavior analysis to teach adaptive behaviors, social skills, and communications/language skills. Additional emphasis will be on designing instruction to generalize and be maintained in home and community environments. Developmental and behavioral strategies will be compared and contrasted. The pre-service educator will design and demonstrate effective evidence-based multisensory literacy and numeracy practices. The pre-service educator will conduct an in-depth language assessment of a young child with moderate disabilities. Based on this assessment information, pre-service educators will select, design, and use technology, materials, and resources required to educate individuals whose disabilities interfere with communication. (Field hours are required).

3

EDU 348 Class Organization and Management Mild/Moderate Needs

Presents the 3-tiered model of Response to Instruction in providing services to students with disabilities with challenging behavior. The development of the individual education plan (IEP) will be addressed with a focus on meeting core curriculum standards, the challenges of accountability testing, and the delivery of specially designed instruction, related services, and supplemental aides and services in co-teaching inclusive environments. In addition, the Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) and Behavior-Intervention Plan (BIP), required components of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) will be discussed. Positive behavior support with an emphasis on Tier 1 classroom management practices and Tier 2 individualized supports will be addressed. The principles and techniques of applied behavioral analysis to plan interventions for students exhibiting learning and behavioral difficulties will be introduced.

3

EDU 360 Middle School: Curriculum Methods & Management of Early Adolescents

Provides an in-depth study of the nature, needs, and developmental characteristics of early adolescents. Knowledge about the intellectual, moral, physical, emotional, and social development of this age group is paramount in understanding the impact these characteristics have on the selection and decisions concerning the curriculum content, instructional strategies and classroom management. The developmentally responsive middle level school program as outlined by the Middle Level Educators Association will be addressed and examined as the cornerstone for course instruction; emphasis is placed on the principles and practices of effective middle school education. Emphasis is also placed on the principles and practices of effective middle level education. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required. (Field hours are required). Candidate Dispositions are assessed.

3

EDU 361 Assessment and Interventions for Students with Challenging Behavior

Will address the biological and environmental factors that dynamically influence and interact with each other in the development of emotional and behavioral disorders. Strategies that help a professional to develop supportive relationships with professionals that foster a youth's resiliency will be discussed. This course is a continuation of the Response to Instruction Model and Tier 1 evidence-based practices discussed in EDU 348. In this course, the emphasis is on Tier 3 specialized and intensive interventions and wrap-around services. Pre-service educators will demonstrate evidence-based strategies; such as social skill instruction, anger management interventions, and drop-out prevention strategies. The laws and policies regarding assessments, disciplinary procedures, individual education plans that include behavior intervention plans, and manifest determination requirements will be discussed. In addition, the types and importance of information shared between families and public agencies concerning students with emotional and behavior disabilities will be addressed. (Field Hours are required.)

3

EDU 365 Teaching Integrated Social Studies

Prepares teacher education candidates to select, integrate and translate knowledge and methodology from history and the social science disciplines. Course topics will include gender, race, religion, and culture, along with time, continuity, and change (American heritage), people, places and environment (World Interaction and Culture) and individual groups and institutions (People and Society). Special emphasis will be placed on the Social Studies: Ohio's Academic Content Standards. Candidates will develop a multi-disciplinary/interdisciplinary unit incorporating concepts from all disciplines to provide instruction that provides students with real-life learning opportunities. In-depth exploration of methods, materials, assessment, and technology will be investigated in the implementation of all activities, lessons, and units.

3

EDU 366 Preparing Educators for Virtual Contexts

Prepares candidates to understand, create and disseminate electronic tutorials or lessons for virtual learners integrating best practices in virtual teaching. It includes participation in integrated field experiences teaching in both synchronous and asynchronous environments utilizing established partnerships with both public and private schools. The course includes an examination of theoretical of online lesson design and delivery with the theory "Learning By Design (Koehler and Mishra, 2005)". Candidates will apply appropriate instructional strategies and models of design in the online learning environment with NETS-T and iNACOL Standards and intentional and systematic practice of the TPACK framework (Koehler and Mishra, 2008). 

Subject matter of this course, divided into main units (without descriptive detail), and listed in order of presentation: 

  1. Overview of K-12 Online Education 
  2. Principles of Online Instruction
  3. Tools for Teaching Online 
  4. Building an Online Community 
  5. Supporting all Learners
  6. Digital Citizenship
3

Prerequisites

Education Major

EDU 405 Teaching Strategies

Is taken in conjunction with student teaching (clinical practice) for quality educators to analyze teaching theory, have a pragmatic application of the best practices of current strategies of teaching within specific licensure areas, and evaluate student learning. The course is designed to enable candidates in teacher education to acquire knowledge as professional educators, work more effectively and reflectively in the classroom, analyze their own teaching from various perspectives, and promote high levels of academic achievement for all students. Candidates develop and implement the Teacher Performance Assessment (TPA): Context for Learning Information, central focus, pre/post-test, video-taped learning segment, detailed lesson plans, Planning Commentary, Instructing and Engaging Students, Student Work Samples, Evidence of Feedback, Assessment Commentary, and Analyzing Teaching. The Value-Added Dimension requires that the learning segment be aligned to the Common Core Standards. Candidates participate in PRAXIS II preparation, view video models on classroom management, and reflect on various teaching strategies.

3

EDU 410 Early Childhood Student Teaching

Provides the candidate the opportunity to gradually assume the role and responsibility of the classroom teacher in pre-kindergarten through grade three under the supervision of qualified school and University personnel. This experience allows the candidate pursuing the early childhood license to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the entry-year teacher in the State of Ohio within the ten performance areas: subject matter, student learning, diversity of learners, planning instruction, instructional strategies, learning environment, communication, assessment, professional development, and student support. The student teacher is assigned for one semester on a full-time, all-day basis with supplemental conferences and seminars to provide reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required.

9

EDU 411 Intervention Specialist Student Teaching

Provides the candidate the opportunity to gradually assume the role and responsibility of the intervention specialist in kindergarten through grade twelve for students with mild/moderate educational needs under the supervision of qualified school and University personnel. This experience allows the candidate pursuing the intervention specialist license within the area of mild/moderate educational needs to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the entry-year teacher in the State of Ohio within the ten performance areas: subject matter, student learning, diversity of learners, planning instruction, instructional strategies, learning environment, communication, assessment, professional development, and student support. The student teacher is assigned for one semester on a full-time, all- day basis with supplemental conferences and seminars to provide reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required.

9

EDU 412 Middle Childhood Student Teaching

Provides the candidate the opportunity to gradually assume the role and responsibility of the classroom teacher in grades four through nine under the supervision of qualified school and University personnel. This experience allows the candidate pursuing the curriculum areas named in the middle childhood license to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the entry-year teacher in the State of Ohio within the ten performance areas: subject matter, student learning, diversity of learners, planning instruction, instructional strategies, learning environment, communication, assessment, professional development, and student support. The student teacher is assigned for one semester on a full-time, all- day basis with supplemental conferences and seminars to provide reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required.

9

EDU 414 Adolescence and Young Adult Student Teaching

Provides the candidate the opportunity to gradually assume the role and responsibility of the classroom teacher in grades seven through twelve under the supervision of qualified school and University personnel. This experience allows the candidate pursuing the curriculum areas named in the adolescence to young adult license to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the entry-year teacher in the State of Ohio within the ten performance areas: subject matter, student learning, diversity of learners, planning instruction, instructional strategies, learning environment, communication, assessment, professional development, and student support. The student teacher is assigned for one semester on a full-time, all-day basis with supplemental conferences and seminars to provide reflection analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required.

9

EDU 415 Dual Licensure (Early Childhood and Intervention Specialist) Student Teaching

Provides the candidate the opportunity to gradually assume the role and responsibility of the classroom teacher in a typical pre-kindergarten through grade three classroom and as an intervention specialist in kindergarten through grade twelve for students with mild/moderate educational needs, under the supervision of qualified school and University personnel. This experience allows the candidate pursuing the early childhood and intervention specialist (mild/moderate) license to demonstrate the knowledge, dispositions, and skills of the entry-year teacher in the State of Ohio within the ten performance areas: subject matter, student learning, diversity of learners, planning instruction, instructional strategies, learning environment, communication, assessment, professional development, and student support. The student teacher is assigned for one semester on a full-time, all-day basis with supplemental conferences and seminars to provide reflection, analysis, and evaluation of the experience. Performance-based assessments adhering to CAEP Standards and Specialized Professional Associations (SPA) are required.

9

EDU 435 Coordinating Seminar

Is taken concurrently with student teaching. Regularly scheduled meetings are held throughout the semester to discuss classroom difficulties, behavior management techniques, methodology, professional ethics, resume writing and job interviewing skills.

1

EGR 201 Engineering Innovation I

This course introduces students to engineering method. Students will be familiarized with the various engineering subdisciplines. Team oriented design projects will be used to build skills in engineering design and problem solving. Professional communication skills will be developed within this engineering design setting.

2

EGR 202 Engineering Innovation II

This course complements Engineering Innovation I and aids the introduction of students to engineering and the engineering method. This course will focus on modeling and analysis of engineering systems. Professional communication skills will be developed within this setting of engineering modeling and analysis.

1

EGR 215 Rigid Body Statics

This course provides engineering students a clear and thorough presentation of the theory and application of engineering mechanics to analyze problems-based on forces in static equilibrium acting upon particles and rigid bodies-in a simple and logical manner. Topics include vector analysis of concentrated and distributed force systems by using free body diagrams, moments of force, structural analysis and trusses, couples and equivalent systems, internal forces, friction, centroids, centers of gravity and mass, moments of inertia, and virtual work.

3

Prerequisites

PHY 220, PHY 221

Corequisites

MTH 162

EGR 216 Rigid Body Dynamics

This course will introduce the principles of dynamics of particles and the corresponding equations for rectilinear and curvilinear motion. The dynamics of rigid bodies and selected non-rigid systems in multiple dimensions with an emphasis on engineering applications will be covered. Kinematic analyses of dynamics problems will employ graphical and analytical vector techniques. Absolute and relative motion analysis, work-energy, impact, impulsemomentum, and vibrations are covered. Time permitting, the application of Lagrange's equations to dynamic problems will be introduced.

3

Prerequisites

EGR 215.

EGR 217 Strength of Materials

This course will provide knowledge of a broad range of mechanical properties (modes of deformation, modes of failure) of materials that will be mathematically described for reliability predictions and for choosing materials appropriate to a specific application. Emphasis is on brittle materials, but the behavior of viscoelastic and ductile materials will also be covered. Concepts to be covered include: forces, stresses and strains in solids; linear elasticity and elastic instability; deformation, deflection and stress analysis of structural members (beams, torsion of circular shafts, pressure vessels, etc.); stress and strain transformations; principal stresses; failure theories; statically indeterminate structures; temperature and pre-strain effects; shear force and bending moment; axial, shear, bearing and bending stresses; the concept of column buckling; and Mohr's circle.

3

Prerequisites

EGR 215.

EGR 218 Engineering Thermodynamics

This course will provide a fundamental grounding in the principles and methods of classical engineering thermodynamics, with an emphasis on practical applications through analytical problem formulation and solving. Topics to be covered include heat, work, kinetic theory of gases, thermodynamics systems and equations of state, the four laws of thermodynamics, energy availability, reversible and irreversible processes, control volumes, phase change and multiphase systems, steam quality and superheating, and an introduction to the basic operation of thermodynamic power cycles.

3

Prerequisites

PHY 222, PHY 223.

ENG 103 Freshman English I

Is designed to help students become better writers. Students read and discuss classic and contemporary literary works used as models for their own writing. Students are introduced to a variety of writing activities throughout the course, including the four major discourses of writing (description, narration, exposition, and persuasion). Writing guidelines and rhetorical strategies are studied as students work through the stages of the writing process. Grammatical correctness and accuracy will be expected of student writing. Students build awareness of their own writing style.

3

ENG 104 Freshman English II

Is designed to continue with the development of the student as writer. Concentration on the organizational structure of the thematic process equips the student with the necessary skills for any academic discourse. The research paper is emphasized, with guidelines and strategies for doing research. Students read and discuss classic and contemporary literary works used as models for their own writing. Students build awareness of their own writing styles. Grammatical correctness and accuracy will be expected of student writing.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 103

ENG 201 Literary Genres and Critical Approaches

Serves as the department's gateway course to the study of literature, introducing students to fundamental generic questions and an array of current critical approaches to literature. Student work is focused upon the critical reading of one or two exemplary English language masterworks in each of three literary genres-poetry, drama, and prose fiction-in conjunction with the study of several significant critical essays devoted to each of these works. Evaluation is based upon several (at least three) student papers submitted during the course of the semester that stake out and defend a position on the literary work in relation to the critical approaches studied. Required of all English majors and education majors seeking AYA certification in English.

3

ENG 203 Studies in Poetry

Is designed to improve the student's ability to read and appreciate poetry. By studying representative poems, the student can acquire knowledge of various kinds of poems, learn and practice a technique of critical reading, and understand the unique power that poetry exercises over the hearts and minds of men. (Does not meet upper-level major requirement.)

3

ENG 204 Studies in Fiction

Is designed to improve the student's ability to read and appreciate fiction. By studying representative stories, the student can understand how different aspects of fiction (conflict, plot, characterization, style, point of view, etc.) illuminate themes and ideas that often elude a casual reading. (Does not meet upper-level major requirement.)

3

ENG 205 Studies in Drama

Is designed to improve the student's ability to read and appreciate dramas. Since nearly all dramas are intended for enactment on a stage, the reader's imaginative powers are required to appreciate fully the playwright's intent. By studying representative plays, students gain insight into the richness and diversity of drama and enhance their capacity to appreciate live dramatic productions. (Does not meet upper-level major requirement.)

3

ENG 209 World Epics

Treats epics that are foundational for ideas and images of Western literature, as well as epics that serve the same role in non-Western countries. The epic is examined as literature, history, philosophy, theology, ethics, and travel guide combined. Western works may include the Homeric epics, The Aeneid, Jerusalem Delivered, The Song of Roland, Parzifal, or the Morte D'Arthur. Non-western epics may include sections from the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Analects of Confucius, or the Mali Epic of Son-Jara among others.

3

ENG 210 Epic and the Person

Invites students to explore changing relations between the individual and society in and through classic examples of Western epic. Course readings allow students to see both continuity and difference in the passage from Greek and Roman epic (e.g., Iliad and The Aeneid) to Dante's Christian masterpiece, The Divine Comedy. St. Augustine's reflections on the soul in the Confessions provide an important hinge in the course as we explore the movement from pagan classical to medieval Christian conceptions of culture, society, and selfhood.

3

ENG 211 Lyric and Dramatic Voices

Focuses upon examples of lyric poetry and drama, with special attention to voice and the way in which selected examples of these two literary genres characterize human subjectivity. The course proceeds through three units: ancient lyric and dramatic voices (Greek lyric and tragedy, the Psalms); early modern/Renaissance lyric and dramatic voices (several plays of Shakespeare, as well as selected sonnets and other English lyric poetry of the period); and modern lyric and dramatic voices (e.g., Wordsworth, Keats, Hopkins, Yeats, Eliot, and a novel such as Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment). Each unit contains representative masterpieces that are significant for an understanding of the development and articulation over time of a specifically Christian literary voice.

3

ENG 225 Advanced Composition I

Offers an intense practice in the process of exposition. Students will work with audience and purpose, along with the rhetorical devices used both in argumentative and persuasive writing. Both analytical writing and an advanced research study will complete this course. Computer-assisted instruction is utilized as a tool in the writing process.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 104

ENG 226 Classical Mythology

Is a background course in Greek and Roman mythology. Readings will be taken from classical literature in translation as well as from later compilations. Attention will be given to the many ways in which classical mythology still touches our culture in art, music, and literature. The implications of various myths for psychology, anthropology, theology, philosophy, and history will be discussed.

3

ENG 227 Philosophical and Biblical Themes in Literature

Examines a particular theme (or themes) that can be fruitfully addressed through selected literary, philosophical, biblical, and theological readings. Through the theme or themes addressed, students are introduced to concepts, images, and stories that have played and continue to play a significant role in literature and art (e.g., Plato's ladder of loves, the cave allegory, the chariot of the soul, and so on; Aristotle on friendship, the unmoved mover, places of invention and poetics, and so on; biblical well-springs of literature; various Patristic and medieval contributions); at the same time, students are guided to discover and think about the many ways in which philosophical and theological thinking and discourse relate to the reading and analysis of literary works. Theme(s) will be listed as part of the title.

3

ENG 235 The African-American Experience

Studies the experience of the African-American as found in American literature from colonial times to the present, including representative works from writers of color. Special prominence is given to slave narratives of the 19th century and images of the African-American in 20th century works.

3

ENG 280 Phonics and the History of Language

Is the study of the phonology, morphology, syntax and grammar of the English language, and its relationship to other languages in the Indo-European family. Students learn methods of representing the sounds of current English, as well as those of earlier forms of English, the common Germanic language from which it evolved, and the Indo-European parent language.

3

ENG 290 Speech Communication

Is a fundamental course in the principles of effective communication, including intrapersonal and interpersonal communication as a basis for effective public speaking. Work on development of the speaking voice, correct diction, and enumeration is stressed.

3

ENG 300 American Poetry

Surveys the ideas, images, legends, and verse method that form American poetry from colonial times to the early 20th century. Attention is given to the English and traditional quality of the poetry as well as the desire to forge a new literature based on the sense of America as a unique experiment.

3

ENG 301 American Literature to 1865

Studies the origins and development of American literature including the study of 16th century Spanish voyages of discovery, colonial Puritanism, and the Civil War period. Emphasis is given to the development of literary forms such as the sermon, the Puritan hagiography, the novel, the short story, and the corresponding evolution of myths of American identity.

3

ENG 302 American Literature from 1865

Concerns the literary reflections on the cataclysmic events of the American Civil War and its aftermath in modern America. This course examines how the nation's premier writers and poets attempt to define American identity within the crises of the modern world.

3

ENG 315 Dante's Divine Comedy

Comprises primarily a close study of Dante's masterpiece, The Divine Comedy, though additional readings in his epistles, La Vida Nuova, De Monarchia, and the Convivio might illumine the major work. An understanding of the cultural, political, and theological background of the work is the major goal of the course.

3

ENG 318 European Romanticism

Explores the Romantic ideal in literature as it appeared in various European nations. Dominant themes and forms of the movement are encountered in the works of major romantics and their contemporaries, such as Goethe, Schiller, Novalis, and Heine (Germany); Rousseau, Hugo, and Balzac (France); Foscolo and Leopardi (Italy); and Kierkegaard (Denmark).

3

ENG 320 Business and Professional Writing

Deals with the genre of informational writing found in scientific prose and in business communication. Not only are composition and format skills stressed, but the strategy behind this writing is also studied, especially with the job-packet section (résumé/interview). A foundation of composition knowledge is necessary for this course. Computer-assisted instruction as a tool in the writing process is optional.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 103 or ENG 104

ENG 321 Advanced Composition II

Continues with the argumentative process where audience analysis becomes a focus and where the appeal to both logic and emotion is studied and modeled. Students should know composition techniques and should have a command of the research process.Computer-assisted instruction as a tool in the writing process is utilized.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 225

ENG 322 Rhetoric

Covers the study of syllogistic/logical strategy, persuasive writing, and the principles involved not only in rhetoric, but also in the rhetorical act. Focus on fallacious argumentation in political and advertising rhetoric alerts students to manipulative techniques. Critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills are the main ingredients of this class. Students need a thorough understanding of research and composition skills before taking this course.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 103 or ENG 104; ENG 225

ENG 324 Shakespeare's Histories and Comedies

Explores Shakespeare's development as a writer of comedies and historical dramas. By studying plays representative of different phases in Shakespeare's career, students gain an appreciation of his growing mastery over the genre of comedy and historical plays. Attention is given to Shakespeare's development in plotting, characterization, and style from his early plays to the maturity of the high comedies. While this course primarily enables students to deal with the plays as literature, attention is also given to their nature as theatrical productions.

3

ENG 325 Shakespeare: The Tragedies and Tragi-Comedies

Explores Shakespeare's development as a writer of tragedies and romances. The nature of tragedy is explored as Shakespeare's growing mastery over this genre is traced-from the early, derivative plays to the pinnacle of achievement in this form, and beyond. By studying Shakespeare's romances, students gain an appreciation of his last phase, the period of the tragi-comedies. While this course primarily enables students to deal with the plays as literature, attention is also given to their nature as theatrical productions.

3

ENG 326 English Literature of the Medieval Period

Studies English literature from its beginning to about 1485. Works such as The Dream of the Rood, The Wanderer, Beowulf, Bede's Ecclesiastical History, and Mallory's Le Morte de Arthur will be read in translation. Middle English works will be read in their original forms.

3

ENG 327 Grammar and its Teaching Methods

Is designed to meet the needs of students who will teach English on the secondary level or who will continue with graduate studies in English. The study of grammar includes traditional, structural, and transformational terminology and characteristics. The methodology includes sentence expansion, sentence combining, and other classroom teaching strategies. Grammar will be approached as a functional and rhetorical device to the writing process and not in total isolation. Students who register for this course should have some general knowledge of grammar.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 103 or ENG 104 or ENG 225 or ENG 321

ENG 328 Teaching Writing as a Process

Is designed to meet the needs of those students who are working on secondary certification. Since composition theory is part of the high school curriculum, students can concentrate on methods of teaching composition. The nucleus of this course focuses on the stages of the writing process, along with various teaching techniques. Students have the opportunity to simulate a classroom situation where they will present a lesson in composition study so that different methods can be critiqued for their effectiveness.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 103 or ENG 104 or ENG 225 or ENG 321

ENG 331 Studies in Chaucer

Affords students the opportunity to appreciate the richness and variety of the Father of English Poetry." Chaucer's writings will be examined as exemplary works of Christian humanism. Working in the poet's own Middle English (itself a rewarding challenge), students experience the moral complexity and timelessness of The Canterbury Tales as well as several lesser-known works such as The Book of the Duchess, The House of Fame, or Troilus and Cressida."

3

ENG 332 Creative Writing

Provides training and practice in the use of imaginative writing: the short story, poetry, and the one act play, with particular emphasis given to the demands of each genre. Students will read good works, learn the value of risk, language play, precision, and revision as they participate in a workshop approach.

3

ENG 334 Writing Poetic Forms

Teaches scansion and other elements of contemporary formal prosody. Students in this course will imitate poetic forms, and in doing so both develop a sense of the relationship between content and reusable forms, and discover the value of surprise and revision. A workshop approach will be employed as they study forms such as sonnet, villanelle, rondeau, sestina, and haiku.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 332

ENG 335 The English Renaissance

Studies the major literature in English from 1485 to 1650. Particular emphasis will fall on the extraordinary luxuriance of literary works that examine religious and political issues near the end of the reign of Elizabeth I-the period that produced Lyly, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Marlowe, and Jonson.

3

ENG 336 The Metaphysical Poets

Examines the tendency in the late 16th and early 17th centuries to create a poetry that fused the earthly and the transcendental, the human and the divine. Attention will be given to such poets as Donne, Crashaw, Herbert, Vaughan, Traherne, and Marvell.

3

ENG 338 Films of Alfred Hitchcock

This course offers an intensive study of representative films of one of the premier film directors of the 20th century, "Master of Suspense" Alfred Hitchcock. Students will learn to identify Hitchcock's characteristic style and themes, read major film criticism on Hitchcock, and learn how to write about film in composing their own criticism. Particular attention will be given to the Cahiers du Cine'ma school of Hitchcock criticism, which claims a special place for Hitchcock's Catholic sensibilities, notably in terms of the doctrine of Original Sin, and the related cinematic concept of "transference of guilt."  

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 338

ENG 340 Eighteenth-Century Literature

Actually begins in 1660 with the restoration of Charles II to the English throne. Writers in this period actively engaged in the great struggles over religion, politics, and philosophy. Consequently, some of the greatest satires in the English language emerged, typified by the works of John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, and Alexander Pope. This course emphasizes these writers, but also examines new literary expressions of the period such as Restoration Comedy, the periodical essay, the mock-epic, the biography, and literary criticism.

3

ENG 341 Contemporary Christian Poetry

Provides students with an historical overview of late modernist critical theory and creative work before moving into the postmodern period. There it will show students how serious poets have wrestled with poetic matters of theme and Christian belief. Christian poets studied might begin with people like Allan Tate, Richard Wilbur, and Thomas Merton, and move into the contemporary scene with poets like Kathleen Norris, Les Murray, and Paul Mariani.

3

ENG 342 Contemporary Christian Fiction

Provides students with an historical overview of late modernistic critical theory and creative work before moving into the postmodern period. There it will show students how serious fiction writers have wrestled with technical matters and matters of theme and Christian belief. Fiction writers studied might begin with people like Graham Greene, Evelyn Waugh, and Flannery O'Connor, and move into the contemporary scene with writers like Larry Woiwode, Andre Dubus, and Ron Hansen.

3

ENG 345 The Romantic Movement

Explores the poetic reaction to the so- called "Age of Reason" and the Industrial Revolution, attempting to balance reason with spirit and imagination, and industrialization with a renewed emphasis on nature. The poetry of this period (1798-1832), particularly the works of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, will be read and analyzed.

3

ENG 346 The Victorian Period

Is a survey of the literature of England after the Romantics and before the 20th century, the period of Victoria's reign (1837-1901). A study of the nonfiction prose of this period gives the student a background of the major ideas of the period, which tried to yoke the spiritual/creation power of the individual to social forms including the rise of democracy, the advent of evolutionary theory, the waning of religious faith, and experiments with socialism-all of which will offer background to the major poetry of the era.

3

ENG 350 Modern Drama

Concentrates on the revolution in the theater that occurred with the establishment of the so-called "people's theater" in France, in Germany, and in Russia during the late 19th century. By exploring the themes, characterizations, and styles (both literary and theatrical) of playwrights such as Ibsen, Chekov, Strindberg, Shaw, O'Casey, Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, Sartre, Beckett, Brecht, and Arthur Miller, students will appreciate the diversity and the difficulty in understanding what is "modern" in modern drama.

3

ENG 360 Russian Literature

Provides an in depth study of representative masterworks of Russian literature. Exploring prose and poetry of spiritual, literary, and political influence, the course traces the interplay of typically Russian elements and European influences. Authors studied may include Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoi, Solzhenitsyn, Mandelstamm, Akhmatova, and others.

3

ENG 375 Women Writers

Is the study of representative texts from the late 18th through the 20th century, examining how women philosophers and novelists have responded to such issues as the birth of modern feminism, women's place in the public sphere, art and what it means to be a woman artist, and marriage and the family. Authors studied may include Jane Austen, Mary Wollstonecraft, Willa Cather, Zora Neale Hurston, and Sigrid Undset.

3

Prerequisites

At least one previous literature course.

ENG 390 Editing and Proofreading

Introduces students to the fundamentals of professional editing and proofreading, especially as they pertain to the copyediting of manuscripts written according to The Chicago Manual of Style. Topics include the editorial process, conventions and controversies in editing, and the role of the editor in publishing. Students gain intensive, hands-on practice with the mechanics of both copyediting and proofreading. To these ends, emphasis will be placed on issues pertaining to diction, grammatical usage, and punctuation.  

3

Prerequisites

ENG 103 or ENG 104

ENG 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in the areas of literature, writing, or drama. The faculty member serving as the director of the internship may require a capstone paper or project about the internship that serves to integrate the student's work experience with scholarship. Students should have at least a 3.0 quality point average in the major and at least a 2.5 average overall. Students seeking internships are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall, and a contract and registration must be made prior to doing the internship. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

English junior or senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be preapproved.

ENG 404 English Drama

Traces the development of the drama in England from its beginnings in medieval liturgy through the Elizabethan Period (excluding Shakespeare) and the Restoration. Because the Elizabethan theater was rich in both number and quality of plays, that period (1556-1603) will constitute a major focus of the course.

3

ENG 405 Studies in Shakespeare

Allows students to explore Shakespeare's plays and poetry across genres. A generous selection of works will be offered, either organized by theme (e.g., moral virtue, female characters, family relationships) or by chronological development, cross-genre influence (e.g., the fool in tragedy vs. comedy), or performance history.

3

ENG 406 Fiction Writing

Offers intense practice in the writing of short stories. Students will read good contemporary work and workshop their own writing as they attempt to make art from the margins, to tackle tough Christian issues. And in the process of doing so, they will learn to manipulate the elements of fiction, including, among others, point of view, characterization, setting, symbol, and psychic distance.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 332

ENG 407 Poetry Writing

Offers intense practice in the writing of poetry. Modeling and a workshop focus will help students to appreciate and value surprise, density of image, and questions regarding line and rhythm as they attempt to, in Frost's words, move from "delight to wisdom."

3

Prerequisites

ENG 332

ENG 408 Playwriting

Is an introduction to the development of narrative line, character, and dialogue in an original dramatic text. By the end of the semester, the student will have completed a short play, which will receive a staged reading and open critique.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 332

Cross Listed Courses

DRA 408

ENG 409 The Development of the English Novel

Studies the novel as a genre from its beginnings to about 1850. Major writers such as Bunyan, Defoe, Swift, Richardson, Fielding, Sterne, Austen, and the Brontë sisters will be considered as examples of major concerns and ideas.

3

ENG 410 The Modern British Novel

Analyzes works of selected major writers from the mid-19th century to the present. Primary attention is given to the ideas that emerge from the conflict of a religiously ordered society with a modern vision based on determinism in Dickens, the Brontës, Hardy, Ford, Joyce, Waugh, and Greene, among others.

3

ENG 415 The American Novel

Concerns the genesis of the novel in American literature. Attention is given to the evolution of the American novel from various myths and images of American history. Representative masterpieces by writers such as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Cather, Faulkner, O'Connor, Ellison, Percy, and others will be studied.

3

ENG 416 Modern World Literature

Presents a thoughtful selection of Western and non-Western literature designed to illustrate the variety of cultural representations as well as the tensions between Western and non-Western nations and ideals from approximately 1914 to the present. Works may include prose, poetry, and non-fiction by Achebe, Solzhenitsyn, Endo, Mishima, Borges, Mafouz, Marquez, Soyinka and others.

3

ENG 420 Writing Creative Nonfiction

Is designed to help students experience the genre of creative nonfiction and to study its characteristics. This literature, known as the literature of fact, is that branch of writing which employs literary techniques and artistic vision associated with fiction or poetry in order to report actual events and persons. Students discuss and analyze creative nonfiction readings, using them as models for their own writing.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 103 or ENG 104 or ENG 225 or ENG 321 or ENG 332

ENG 421 Readings in American Literature

Is a specialized in-depth study of the works of a single American author or a few related authors. This course may be repeated for credit if different authors are studied. Author(s) will be listed as part of the course title.

3

ENG 422 Readings in British Literature

Is a specialized in-depth study of the works of a single British author or a few related authors. This course may be repeated for credit if different authors are studied. Author(s) will be listed as part of the course title.

3

ENG 423 Readings in World Literature

Is a specialized in-depth study of the works of a single world author or a few related authors. This course may be repeated for credit if different authors are studied. Author(s) will be listed as part of the course title.

3

ENG 430 Literary Criticism

Undertakes a detailed analysis of statements from the Classical Period to the present using established theoretical and aesthetic standards. Students will explore not only the nature of literature, but also the very nature of the true and the beautiful, as well as of taste. They will test their criteria for evaluating works of literature against those of the most celebrated literary theorists and practitioners.

3

ENG 434 Senior Thesis

Requires all English majors to write a thesis on an approved literary problem; all students enrolled in ENG 434 must also submit with their completed thesis a portfolio composed of samples of their English course work. Please see the "Portfolio Letter" found under the heading "Thesis Info" on the English department website for full instructions.

1

ENG 440 Modern Poetry

Treats British and American poetry since the late 19th century. It focuses on the elements that define American poetry and modernity, as well as the fundamental shifts that cause us to call poetry modern. Major figures include Pound, Eliot, Yeats, and Frost and many other British and American poets.

3

ENG 445 Modern Short Fiction

Explores the nature of "modernism." By examining selected novellas and short stories by writers such as Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, James, Kafka, O'Connor, Bellow, Baldwin, Ellison, Gaines, Joyce, Faulkner, and Hemingway, attention is given to both thematic and stylistic features in order to better understand what is "modern" about modern fiction.

3

ENG 447 Milton

Is designed to survey the development and variety of John Milton (1608-1674) through a close study of his major poetry and prose works. A thorough reading of his epic Paradise Lost will crown the course, though a study of his earlier poetic development will illuminate that masterpiece for the student, and his prose pamphlets in support of the Puritan revolution will offer some historical and intellectual background to the period.

3

ENG 449 Modern Criticism

Concerns itself with the major literary theorists of the 20th century.

3

ESC 210 Introduction to Athletic Injuries

Outlines and differentiates the basic types of injury sustained during fitness or sporting-related activities. Injuries studied include muscular injuries, ligamentous injuries, fractures and dislocations, as well as closed-head injuries (concussions.) Basic principles of management of these injuries will be developed, though course scope does not approach clinical management. Rather, a thorough understanding of the injury process, the tissues involved, and their typical healing times and response is the focus of IAI. Students will also learn exercise principles in rehabilitation of athletic injuries and basic taping and splinting. Ability to search the current literature via online resources, evaluate strength of research (based on principles taught at the onset of ASEC), and presenting research concerning "Evidence-Based Practice: (EBP) will be included.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 133 or BIO 122 and BIO 123; Not for credit in Biology Major

ESC 220 Strength and Fitness Training and Assessment

Covers skills, knowledge, techniques, and strategies specific to health and performance related to physical fitness. This is applicable to both personal fitness programs and educational settings. This course addresses the scientific basis of designing exercise programs for healthy individuals. Principles of overload, progression, and specific are covered as well as intensity, frequency, duration, and mode. Various methods of training (endurance, interval, resistance, cross-training) are feathered. Ability to search the current literature via online resources, evaluate strength of research (based on principles taught at the onset of ASEC), and presenting research concerning "evidence-based practice" (EBP) would be included.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 133 or BIO 122 and BIO 123; Not for credit in Biology Major

ESC 335 Exercise Physiology

Is the study of the physiological adaptations the body makes to exercise stress. Topics include the principles of strength development, muscular and cardiorespiratory endurance development bioenergetics, energy expenditure, functions of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, neuromuscular and neuroendocrine systems, real function, nutrition, weight control, and body composition. Lab exercises include body composition analysis, metabolic testing (O2 and CO2 measurements at rest and during submaximal exercise), cardiovascular kinetics during exercise (via HR and BP analysis). In addition, field-testing and submaximal cardiovascular testing for a general fitness population, basic muscular flexibility and basic muscular strength testing will be included. This course introduces the fundamental concepts necessary for the student intent on pursuing graduate studies in exercise physiology (EP) or physical therapy (PT). 3 hours lecture with lab assignments.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 133 and BIO 134 or BIO 122 and BIO 123

Cross Listed Courses

BIO 335

ESC 350 Exercise Science Practicum

Is a structured hands-on learning experience designed to complement and expand on the student's academic course work. This course includes readings in related areas, written reports and on-site supervision and evaluation. Students must spend a minimum of 50 hours doing practicum-related activities to earn the 1 credit associated with the practicum course. Possible practicum tracks include, but are not limited to, the following: A) Athletic Training Practicum: Student will work part time with an athletic trainer for a semester. B) Coaching Practicum: Student will work part time as assistant coaches at Franciscan University or local high schools for one season. C) Physical Therapy Practicum: Student will assist and shadow a physical therapist for one semester. D) Personal Trainer Practicum: Student will work part-time as a personal trainer for a semester. E) Exercise Physiology Practicum: Student will design and perform an independent research project. The outcomes will be presented to students and faculty in the program.

1

Prerequisites

ESC 210, ESC 220 or ESC 301; Not for credit in Biology Major

FLM 222 Critical Television Viewing

Surveys contemporary methods of visual analysis. Using a model of criticism based on Aristotle's Rhetoric, four general areas are examined: programming genres, cultural significance of content, social viewing habits, and visual literacy. This course helps the individual development active viewing skills that can be used by media producers, critics, or consumers.

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 222

FLM 325 Cinema Studies

Traces the history of cinema from 1895 to the present in the U.S., Europe, and Asia, focusing on significant directors, movements, influences, films and terminology. Special attention is paid to the tension between film as art and/or as commerce. The course helps students identify important moral and philosophical issues raised by serious as well as entertainment films. It will also help students develop an appreciation of the artistry involved in film production. This course includes weekly screenings of significant films. (2 credits lecture; 1 credit lab)

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 325

FLM 326 French Cinema

Introduces some of the major themes, techniques, movements, and directors of this most important art form of the 20th century. The course teaches the critical skills required for making informed judgments on the artistic merits and deficiencies of cinematic works. Open to all students, with lectures, discussions and readings in English.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FRN 326

FLM 328 Film Analysis and Theory

Surveys the major theories and tools utilized in the analysis of narrative, experimental, and documentary cinema, including formal analysis, semiotics, phenomenology, genre studies, and related approaches. Includes screenings of significant films and application of analytical techniques.

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 328

FLM 329 Cinema of India

Covers the historical development of the world's largest film industry from 1896 to the present, focusing on significant directors, movements, films, terminology, and the influence of socio-cultural factors. The course highlights the tension between popular (musical) and artistic (non-musical) film. It also assists students in developing a deeper understanding of non-Western modes of cinematic storytelling and culture. Includes weekly screenings. All lectures, readings, and discussions are in English. (2 credits lecture; 1 credit lab)

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 329

FLM 331 Mysteries in Film

Compares and contrasts filmic and literary versions of major mystery stories written by various authors, focusing on how they approach a popular fiction genre from various perspectives. Representative works, critical analysis and biographical information will all be included in the course. Other mystery genre short stories and films will be compared and contrasted. (2 credits lecture; 1 credit lab)

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 331

FLM 332 Science Fiction Cinema

Covers the historical development of one of the most innovative and influential genres of world cinema-science fiction-from 1902 to present, focusing on significant directors, movements, films, terminology, and the influence of socio-cultural factors. The course assists students in developing a deeper understanding of how sci-fi cinema has been used to forecast and promote social change, as well as warn about negative social consequences. While the best of world sci-fi cinema will be screened, all lectures, readings, and discussions are in English. 2 hours lecture; 2 hours lab

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 332

FLM 338 Films of Alfred Hitchcock

This course offers an intensive study of representative films of one of the premier film directors of the 20th century, "Master of Suspense" Alfred Hitchcock. Students will learn to identify Hitchcock's characteristic style and themes, read major film criticism on Hitchcock, and learn how to write about film in composing their own criticism. Particular attention will be given to the Cahiers du Cine'ma school of Hitchcock criticism, which claims a special place for Hitchcock's Catholic sensibilities, notably in terms of the doctrine of Original Sin, and the related cinematic concept of "transference of guilt."  

3

Cross Listed Courses

ENG 338

FLM 343 Video Editing

Focuses on the theory and processes of digital video editing for broadcast, professional, and multimedia productions. Both aesthetic and technical principles are applied through small group and individual projects. Lab fee.

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 343

FLM 345 Independent Digital Filmmaking

Focuses on the skills needed to create short independent digital film including budgeting, scripting, location scouting, rehearsing, lighting, filming, editing, scoring, mixing, and marketing. Students will explore the relationship between cinema, culture, and society by producing a short film that makes an important statement about our world today. Students will also explore opportunities to market their films via digital technologies, contests, and the like.

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 345

FLM 412 Film and Western Culture

Is designed to survey the aesthetic, historical, and theoretical aspects of film studies, as a means of appreciating the role of film in modern Western culture, and especially to prepare the student to engage effectively, through this unique medium, historical periods, events, and persons worthy of consideration in the history and culture of the West in general, and Catholic Christian culture in particular. This effort will be accomplished by introducing the student to the history and basic techniques of film making, and by critically evaluating the subject matter of key films in both their historical context and their topical perspective. Through the judicious use of film, the integration of faith, reason, and culture will be enhanced as the student engages, in a modern and distinctive liberal arts manner, the best of Western and Christian culture.

3

Cross Listed Courses

HCC 412/HST 412

FLM 444 Advanced Digital Media Production

Provides practical experience in producing a major digital project from pre-production planning through post-production. It is designed for students seeking to review, apply, and refine production skills at an advanced level. Individual and group activities are included. Lab fee.

3

Cross Listed Courses

COM 444

FLM 484 Digital Compositing and Special Effects

Covers processes and considerations for creating animated interactive multimedia. Students utilize industry-standard applications as they explore post-production techniques, visual effects, compression, convergence, and cross-platform formatting.

3

Prerequisites

COM 243 Broadcast and Electronic Media and COM 281 Graphic Design, or permission of the instructor

Cross Listed Courses

COM 484

FRN 101 Elementary French I

Is the first half of an intensive introduction to French language and culture with emphasis on comprehension and active use of the spoken language, leading to the ability to function at a basic level.

3

FRN 102 Elementary French II

Is the second half of an intensive introduction to French language and culture with emphasis on comprehension and active use of the spoken language, leading to the ability to function at a basic level.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 101 or equivalent

FRN 201 Intermediate French I

Is a continuation of FRN 101- FRN 102 with a review and expansion of grammar and vocabulary.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 102 or equivalent

FRN 202 Intermediate French II

Is a continuation of FRN 101, FRN 102, and FRN 201 with a review and expansion of grammar and vocabulary.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201 or equivalent

FRN 301 Intensive Review of French Grammar

Consists of a systematic study of all aspects of French grammar, syntax, and morphology. Review and expansion of student's knowledge of French vocabulary and idioms are stressed.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 302 Commercial French Translation

Provides practical exercises in translating correspondence and documents from the world of commerce and international relations. The course emphasizes understanding and rendering key concepts, while developing skill and fluency in professional writing in both French and English.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 303 Advanced Composition and Conversation I

Is the first of two courses that consist of structured practice in writing and speaking on selected topics, emphasizing specific grammatical problems. Special emphasis is placed on increasing the student's active French vocabulary.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 304 Advanced Composition and Conversation II

Is the second of two courses that consist of structured practice in writing and speaking on selected topics, emphasizing specific grammatical problems. Special emphasis is placed on increasing the student's active French vocabulary.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 305 Theme and Version

Is an intensive study of French grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and idiomatic expression through written translations from English to French (theme) and from French to English (version).

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 306 Phonetics and Phonology

Consists of a detailed study of the French sound system (morphology, sound production, and intonation) through a variety of pronunciation exercises, as well as transcriptions of French texts using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 322 Francophone World Cultures

Presents the history of French colonialism and the growth and development of unique cultures among a variety of francophone peoples of the world, especially North and West Africa, the Caribbean, and Quebec. Lectures, readings, and discussions are conducted in French.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 326 French Cinema

Introduces some of the major themes, techniques, movements and directors of this most important art form of the 20th century. The course teaches the critical skills required for making informed judgments on the artistic merits and deficiencies of cinematic works. Open to all students, with lectures, discussions, and readings in English.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 326

FRN 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in French. The availability of internships is limited to upper level students, normally juniors and seniors with a 2.5 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

French junior or senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be preapproved.

FRN 407 French Civilization & Literature I (Medieval/Renaissance)

Traces significant aspects of French civilization and literature from its origins to the end of the 16th century including history and society; evolution of culture and ideas; survey of literary genres and works; and artistic trends. Lectures, readings, and discussions are conducted in French.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 408 French Civilization & Literature II (17th & 18th Centuries)

Traces significant aspects of French civilization and literature of the Classical Age and the Enlightenment including history and society; evolution of culture and ideas; survey of literary genres and works; artistic trends. Lectures, readings, and discussions are conducted in French.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 409 French Civilization & Literature III (19th Century)

Traces significant aspects of French civilization and literature from the Napoleonic era to the onset of World War I including history and society; evolution of culture and ideas; survey of literary genres and works and artistic trends. Lectures, readings, and discussions are conducted in French.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 410 French Civilization & Literature IV (20th & 21st Century)

Traces significant aspects of French civilization and literature from World War I to the present day including history and society; evolution of culture and ideas; survey of literary genres and works; and artistic trends. Lectures, readings, and discussions are conducted in French.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent

FRN 424 Readings in Francophone World Literature

Consists of the study of representative literary works by international francophone authors, especially those from North and West Africa, the Caribbean, and Quebec. Lectures, readings, and discussions are conducted in French.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent plus one course above FRN 202 (other than FRN 306)

FRN 431 Periods and Genres of French Literature

Is a flexible course, the contents of which will vary from one semester to another. Study will focus on either a single literary period (Middle Ages, Renaissance, etc.) or a particular genre (lyric poetry, the novel, etc.). Lectures, readings, discussions, and a term paper in French are required. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different from when previously taken.

3

Prerequisites

FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent plus one course above FRN 202 (other than FRN 306)

FRN 432 Modern Catholic Writers

Is a survey of the literature of significant Catholic authors (from the late 19th century through the present) whose works are significantly informed by their religious faith including Bloy, Péguy, Jammes, Claudel, Mauriac, Bernanos, Green, and Cesbron. Lectures and discussions will be conducted in English, with readings in French for French majors, in English for non-majors.

3

Prerequisites

(applies to French Majors only): FRN 201- FRN 202 or equivalent plus one course above FRN 202 (other than FRN 306)

FRN 434 Thesis

Uses guided readings and research to result in a dissertation. Projects for independent study may be of a literary or linguistic nature or may deal with some aspect of French culture. To be selected in consultation with the head of the department.

1

Prerequisites

Permission

FRN 435 Coordinating Seminar

Uses selected readings, research, reports, and discussions of specific authors, genres, or trends in French literature. A recommended course for students planning to enter graduate school.

1

Prerequisites

Permission

GEL 101 Introduction to Geology

Introduces students to the nature and character of the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere that make up planet Earth. Students will examine the history of this planet via the study of geological processes (e.g. volcanism, weathering, glaciation, and plate tectonics) responsible for the origin, development, and subsequent modification of the Earth's landscape. This course will also present students with an overview of the development of life through an examination of the fossil record evident within the continually developing geological record.

3

GEO 122 Introduction to Geography

Studies the fundamental principles and subject matter of geography, especially as conveyed via the four major research traditions of the discipline. This survey will also include a consideration of the central notion of the region, and the other core elements of the discipline such as physical, cultural, human, population, economic, political and urban geography.

3

GRK 101 Elementary Ancient Greek I

Concentrate on the basic morphology, lexicon, and syntax of Attic Greek with short readings from classical authors and from the New Testament.

3

GRK 102 Elementary Ancient Greek II

Concentrate on the basic morphology, lexicon, and syntax of Attic Greek with short readings from classical authors and from the New Testament.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 101

GRK 201 Intermediate Ancient Greek I

Review and augment the material presented in GRK 101- GRK 102, with continued readings from classical authors and from the New Testament. In addition, one short, complete work is read, such as Plato's Ion.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 102. Evidence of intermediate-level proficiency is required for further Greek courses.

GRK 202 Intermediate Ancient Greek II

Review and augment the material presented in GRK 101-GRK 102, with continued readings from classical authors and from the New Testament. In addition, one short, complete work is read, such as Plato's Ion.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 201. Evidence of intermediate-level proficiency is required for further Greek courses.

GRK 207 I Intensive Summer Greek

Is offered as part of the Summer Ancient and Biblical Languages Institute and is designed to provide an intensive study of ancient Greek. Students will complete Hansen and Quinn's Greek, an intensive course, and read one short dialogue of Plato, such as the Ion, and one short New Testament letter, for example, the Epistle of St. James. This course may be taken only by permission of the department, and requires a separate application to the Institute. This course satisfies the university's language requirement.

12

GRK 300 Survey of Greek Prose

Is designed for the reading of selections of Greek prose of various genres and periods from a comprehensive anthology such as Russell's An Anthology of Greek Prose. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major styles of Greek prose from early classical to early Christian authors. This course is required of majors and minors.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 202

GRK 310 Homer

Is designed for the reading of the Iliad and the Odyssey, in order to introduce students to Homeric Greek and to the literary, cultural, and historical significance of the Homeric epics. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material presented is substantially different from that of the student's first enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 202

GRK 320 Greek Drama

Is designed for the reading of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, in order to introduce the student to the language of Greek tragedy and comedy, and to the literary, cultural, and historical significance of these genres. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material presented is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 202

GRK 330 Plato

Is designed for the reading of one longer, complete dialogue, such as the Meno, in order to introduce the student to Plato's Greek, to his seminal method and thought, and to his impact on subsequent thinkers. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material presented is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 202

GRK 340 The Greek Historians

Is designed for the reading of selections from the Greek historians. Particular attention will be paid to Herodotus and Thucydides, in order to introduce students to the idioms and styles of these first historians, to their methods of historical investigation, and to the impact their practice had on subsequent thinkers and historians. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 202

GRK 350 Philosophy and Theology in Greek

Is designed for the reading of philosophers and theologians, whether pagan or Christian, who wrote in Greek after the time of Plato, such as Aristotle, Plotinus, and the Cappadocian Fathers. The course will introduce the student to the idiom and style of the author of focus, to his thought, and to his impact on subsequent thinkers. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 202

GRK 360 The Septuagint and Greek New Testament

Is designed for the reading of the Septuagint and the Greek New Testament, in order to introduce students to the idiom of these sacred texts and to the influences that shaped it. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that, the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 202

GRK 370 Readings in Greek Literature

Is designed for the reading of genres of Greek literature not otherwise covered in the curriculum, e.g., lyric poetry, oratory, biography, satire, or the New Comedy. This course will be offered as there is need and interest, and it may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

GRK 202

GRM 101 Elementary German I

Is the first half of a two-semester course sequence that studies the fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar using extensive written and oral exercises and language lab work.

3

GRM 102 Elementary German II

Is the second half of a two-semester course sequence that studies the fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar using extensive written and oral exercises and language lab work.

3

Prerequisites

GRM 101 or permission

GRM 201 Intermediate German I

Is the first half of a two-semester course sequence that reviews and expands upon basic German grammar. Practice in conversation and composition is emphasized along with selected readings and language lab drills.

3

Prerequisites

GRM 102 or permission

GRM 202 Intermediate German II

Is the second half of a two-semester course sequence that reviews and expands upon basic German grammar. Practice in conversation and composition is emphasized along with selected readings and language lab drills.

3

Prerequisites

GRM 201 or permission.

GRM 303 Advanced Composition and Conversation I

Is the first of two courses that concentrate on the more subtle elements of German grammar and style, practice in writing, and speaking. This course is conducted in German.

4

Prerequisites

GRM 201, GRM 202, or permission.

GRM 304 Advanced Composition and Conversation II

Is the second of two courses that concentrate on the more subtle elements of German grammar and style, practice in writing, and speaking. This course is conducted in German.

4

Prerequisites

GRM 201, GRM 202, or permission.

GRM 305 German through Film and Readings I

Is the first of two courses that work with selected German-language films and coordinated readings in German to provide culturally authentic initial advanced-level practice in all four skill areas of German: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Emphasis is placed on comprehension, communicative ability, as well as linguistic accuracy. Therefore, basic grammar concepts are reviewed and advanced grammar and style concepts are studied as warranted. Readings, lectures, discussions, task assignments, written and oral projects, as well as exams are in German.

4

Prerequisites

GRM 202, equivalent, or permission.

GRM 306 German through Film and Readings II

Is the second of two courses that work with selected German-language films and coordinated readings in German to provide culturally authentic initial advanced-level practice in all four skill areas of German: listening, reading, writing, and speaking. Emphasis is placed on comprehension, communicative ability, as well as linguistic accuracy. Therefore, basic grammar concepts are reviewed and advanced grammar and style concepts are studied as warranted. Readings, lectures, discussions, task assignments, written and oral projects, as well as exams are in German.

4

Prerequisites

GRM 202, equivalent, or permission.

GRM 311 German to English Translation

Provides practice in the craft of German to English translation.

2

Prerequisites

GRM 202, equivalent, or permission; GRM 303 or GRM 304 or GRM 305 or GRM 306 taken previously is recommended.

GRM 312 English to German Translation

Provides practice in the craft of English to German translation.

2

Prerequisites

GRM 202, equivalent, or permission; GRM 303-GRM 304 or GRM 305-GRM 306 taken previously is strongly recommended.

GRM 333 The Aftermath of the Nazi Horror in German-Language Film from 1946 to the Present I

Is the first of two courses that investigate how German culture from 1946 onward dealt with the Nazi past, the war, the Holocaust and their various after-effects, as well as the question of resistance, survival, and guilt by studying selected German-language films on the subject that were produced in the German-speaking countries between then and now.

2

Notes

This course meets for 3 contact hours per week.

Prerequisites

If taught in German: GRM 202, equivalent or permission; GRM 303 or GRM 304 or GRM 305 or GRM 306 taken previously is recommended.

GRM 334 The Aftermath of the Nazi Horror in German-Language Film from 1946 to the Present II

Is the second of two courses that investigate how German culture from 1946 onward dealt with the Nazi past, the war, the Holocaust and their various after-effects, as well as the question of resistance, survival, and guilt by studying selected German-language films on the subject that were produced in the German-speaking countries between then and now.

2

Notes

This course meets for 3 contact hours per week.

Prerequisites

If taught in German: GRM 202, equivalent or permission; GRM 303 or GRM 304 or GRM 305 or GRM 306 taken previously is recommended.

GRM 380 Readings in German Literature

Is a flexible course, the contents of which will vary from one semester to another. Study may focus on an author, group of authors, literary movement, period, genre, theme or a region of German literature. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different from when previously taken.

2

Prerequisites

GRM 202, equivalent, or permission; GRM 303 or GRM 304 or GRM 305 or GRM 306 taken previously is recommended.

GRM 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in German. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally juniors and seniors with a 2.5 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

German junior or senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be preapproved.

GRM 426 Issues in German Culture and Literature I: From the Beginnings through 1249

Is an integrated, issue-oriented study of German culture and selected literary works from the Germanic times through the High Middle Ages. Readings, lectures, discussions, oral reports, writing assignments, and exams are mostly in Modern Standard German.

4

Prerequisites

GRM 303 or GRM 304 or GRM 305 or GRM 306 or permission.

GRM 427 Issues in German Culture and Literature II: From 1250 through 1699

Is a continuation of the integrated, issue-oriented study of German culture and literature begun in GRM 426, but covering the time period from the Late Middle Ages through the 17th century. Readings, lectures, discussions, oral reports, writing assignments, and exams are mostly in Modern Standard German.

4

Prerequisites

GRM 303 or GRM 304 or GRM 305 or GRM 306 or permission.

GRM 428 Issues in German Culture and Literature III: From 1700 through 1849

Continues the integrated, issue-oriented study of German culture and literature begun in GRM 426 and GRM 427 by examining the 18th and first half of the 19th century. Readings, lectures, discussions, oral reports, writing assignments, and exams are predominantly in German.

4

Prerequisites

GRM 303 or GRM 304 or GRM 305 or GRM 306 or permission.

GRM 429 Issues in German Culture and Literature IV: From 1850 through the Present

Concludes the integrated, issue-oriented study of German culture and literature of GRM 426, GRM 427, and GRM 428 by examining the second half of the 19th century and the 20th century. Readings, lectures, discussions, oral reports, writing assignments, and exams are predominantly in German.

4

Prerequisites

GRM 303 or GRM 304 or GRM 305 or GRM 306 or permission.

GRM 434 Senior Thesis

Uses guided readings and research to result in a baccalaureate-level thesis. Projects for independent study are chosen in consultation with the supervising instructor and may deal with an aspect of the language, literature, or culture and civilization of the German-speaking people.

1

Prerequisites

Permission.

GRM 435 Coordinating Seminar

Requires guided readings, research, and discussions on an aspect of the language, literature, or culture and civilization of the German-speaking people, culminating in a research paper. Students will present their papers orally to the seminar group.

1

Prerequisites

Permission.

HCC 201 Religion and Culture

Is the introductory course to the Humanities and Catholic Culture major. The student will be introduced to: the classical and Catholic understanding of a liberal arts education; the multifaceted relationship between religion and culture; and the manner in which Christianity has shaped Western Civilization and the modern world. All three areas will be considered especially in light of the thought of Christopher Dawson. Required of all Humanities and Catholic Culture majors.

3

HCC 401 Catholicism and the Modern World

Examines how Catholicism and leading Catholic thinkers have addressed the philosophical, intellectual, social, and political trends, many of which have been markedly secular since the Enlightenment. Particular focus is given to the Catholic response to such leading modern thinkers as Descartes, Kant, and Marx and to such modern socio-political ideologies as Marxism, fascism, and socialism. The area of possible compatibility between modern philosophy and the Catholic worldview are explored. The struggle of the Church and her intellectual defenders to shape a Catholic culture in spite of modern secular trends and the very question of whether this is possible, are considered. Attention is also given to the Catholic response, by Pope John Paul II and others, to the thought and intellectual trends and political-social-cultural developments, such as the movement toward globalism, in the contemporary world. Christopher Dawson's interpretation of the development of the modern world will figure prominently in this examination. Required of all Humanities and Catholic Culture majors.

3

Prerequisites

HCC Major or Permission of Instructor

HCC 404 Catholics, Catholicism, and American Culture

Studies the Catholic historical experience in America, including both the highlights of the history of Catholic ethnic groups in the American population and of the Church in the US. It considers the leading contributions of Catholics and Catholicism to American culture and life and examines the crucial question of whether Catholicism is compatible with the founding principles of the American nation. Christopher Dawson's interpretation of the relationship between Catholicism and American culture will figure prominently in this examination. Required of all Humanities and Catholic Culture majors.

3

Prerequisites

HCC Major or Permission of Instructor

HCC 411 Selected Themes in Catholic Culture

Examines in depth a specific theme or topic within the study of Catholic culture thorough the ages. The theme or topic may be a more extensive consideration of a theme or topic introduced in one of the other HCC courses, or of a particular time period within one of the large chronological eras covered in the other courses. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different from when previously taken.

2

HCC 412 Film and Western Culture

Is designed to survey the aesthetic, historical, and theoretical aspects of film studies, as a means of appreciating the role of film in modern Western culture, and especially to prepare the student to engage effectively, through this unique medium, historical periods, events, and persons worthy of consideration in the history and culture of the West in general, and Catholic Christian culture in particular. This effort will be accomplished by introducing the student to the history and basic techniques of film making, and by critically evaluating the subject matter of key films in both their historical context and their topical perspective. Through the judicious use of film the integration of faith, reason, and culture will be enhanced as the student engages, in a modern and distinctive liberal arts manner, the best of Western and Christian culture.

3

Cross Listed Courses

FLM 412/ HST 412

HCC 435 Coordinating Seminar

Involves readings, discussion, and writing on a selected theme or themes in Catholic culture. The approach will be interdisciplinary, with an attempt to bring the various disciplines studied in the major to bear on the focused themes. Each student will be expected to do a written or other major project studying the impact of Catholicism on culture as seen through one of the disciplines. Required of all Humanities and Catholic Culture majors.

1

Prerequisites

Senior standing

HEB 105 Elementary Biblical Hebrew I

Is the first semester of the two-semester sequence in elementary biblical Hebrew. This sequence prepares the student to recognize nearly all grammatical forms found in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, to master an 800-1000 word vocabulary, and to translate prose portions of the Old Testament with the aid of a dictionary.

3

HEB 106 Elementary Biblical Hebrew II

Is the second semester of the two-semester sequence in elementary biblical Hebrew. This sequence prepares the student to recognize nearly all grammatical forms found in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, to master an 800-1000 word vocabulary, and to translate prose portions of the Old Testament with the aid of a dictionary.

3

Prerequisites

HEB 105

HEB 205 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I-Prose

Is the first semester of the two-semester sequence in intermediate biblical Hebrew. This course focuses on prose portions of the Hebrew Bible from the Pentateuch and historical books. Attention is now paid to the finer points of Hebrew syntax, the proper use of the textual apparatus provided by the standard form of the Hebrew Bible (the Masoretic Text), and basic principles of exegesis. Vocabulary will be developed to include all words occurring 50 or more times in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible.

3

Prerequisites

HEB 106

HEB 206 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II-Poetry

is the second semester of the two-semester sequence in intermediate biblical Hebrew. This course focuses largely on the Psalms and a few instances of embedded poems in the biblical Hebrew narrative. The particular challenges of translating Hebrew poetry will be addressed. Vocabulary will be developed to include all words occurring 10 or more times in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible. An exegetical paper will be required. This course fulfills an upper-level elective requirement for the Theology Major, as well as for the Classics Major.

3

Prerequisites

HEB 205.

Cross Listed Courses

THE 206

HEB 207 I Intensive Summer Biblical Hebrew

Is offered as part of the Summer Ancient and Biblical Languages Institute, and is designed to provide an intensive study of biblical Hebrew. The course provides the equivalent of a two-semester sequence in elementary biblical Hebrew, including an introduction to all but the very rarest grammatical forms in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible, and the acquisition of an 800-word vocabulary of the most common biblical Hebrew words. At the completion of the course, the student will be able to translate most prose sections of the Old Testament with the aid of a dictionary. This course may be taken only by permission of the department and requires a separate application to the Institute.

6

HLS 201 The Culture of Death and the Culture of Life

first explores the deeper historical, philosophical, theological, and political roots of the various issues defining the Culture of Death, both in its ancient and modern form. Then we go into a detailed study of the Culture of Life as initiated by the Church, both at its origin and in answer to the contemporary Culture of Death (paying particular attention to Saint John Paul's II's Evangelium Vitae). Finally, we go into detailed study of specific moral issues such as human trafficking, prostitution, pornography, contraception and gendercide.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

3

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course.

HLS 202 Life Issues, Marriage, and the Family

Begins by a detailed study of the history of marriage in the West, and the place of the great marriage encyclicals (Arcanum and Casti Connubii) and the Catechism within that context. We then move on to a deeper analysis of the issue of same-sex "marriage", focusing especially on how it was successfully pushed through politically, culturally, and intellectually, and what this means for the relationship of church and state. We end with a focus on the best contemporary arguments and political strategies that would reaffirm heterosexual monogamy against same-sex "marriage."  There are no prerequisites for this course.  

3

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course.

HLS 301 Life Issues and the Law

Begins with a deep historical, philosophical, and legal account of the transformation in legal philosophy and practice from a Catholic-friendly common law/natural law foundation, to a positive law foundation antithetical to the Church's understanding of the proper foundation of law. This transformation was the necessary precursor to all the bad landmark Supreme Court cases ushering in the culture of death. HLS 301 then treats the landmark Supreme Court cases that helped usher in the Culture of Death, adding to this study of cases at least two in-depth books that treat the larger historical-political context of the chosen cases.  There are no prerequisites for this course.

3

Prerequisites

There are no prerequisites for this course.

HLS 401 HUMAN LIFE STUDIES: SELECTED THEMES

treats in depth a particular area or subject within domain of human life studies.  This course provides a more extensive examination of one or more of the areas introduced in the other HLS courses.  This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different from when previously taken.  Prerequisites:  Varies according to topic; students should check with the HLS Program Director.

HLS 403 Research-Practicum

Each student will have two tasks to complete for the Thesis-Practicum. The first task is to write a kind of capstone paper of 20 pages for the HLS minor that (a) shows the student's in-depth knowledge of one of the issues treated in HLS, and (b) offers a detailed real-life plan for how the student is going to impact this issue in his or her chosen field of work or future study. This paper will be based on a paper that students are required to write for HLS 201. The second task is to work with Franciscan University's Career Services Office on a one-to-one basis, meeting perhaps once a week, to apply to jobs and/or graduate programs so that the student can make the next necessary, practical step in impacting the culture.  

1

Prerequisites

Students must have completed all required courses for the HLS Minor (or be completing those requirements during the Spring semester of their senior year).

HLS 407 Human Life Studies: Internship

Allows the student the opportunity to acquire practical skills and experience in the pro-life/pro-family apostolate through a practicum and by serving with a pro-life/pro-family organization supportive of the mission of Catholic Church and the natural law as approved by the HLS Program Director. This course may be repeated for up to 6 hours of credit.

1-6

Prerequisites

HLS minors who have completed HLS 201 or HLS 202 or HLS 301 or permission of the HLS Program Director

HON 101 Seminar I: Early Classical Thought

Begins the exploration of the origins of Western tradition in the epic poems of Homer, the plays of the great Greek dramatists of the Athenian Golden Age, and the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides.

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the Honors Program

HON 102 Seminar II: Later Classical Thought

Continues the work of the first seminar with a focus on the writings of Plato and Aristotle and a transition to the literary and philosophic works of Roman authors and others who write about Rome and her legacy. With this seminar the work of syntopic reading begins as students reflect upon the relation of the ideas of one age upon those of another.

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the Honors Program and HON 101

HON 201 Seminar III: The Early Fathers

Focuses on the writings of the Greek and Latin Fathers of the Church and introduces into the syntopic discussion the ideas, teachings, and discipline of Christianity.

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the Honors Program and HON 102

HON 202 Seminar IV: Medieval Thought

Focuses on great works form the high Middle Ages, including the philosophical and theological writings of Saints Anselm, Bonaventure, and Thomas Aquinas, and the literary writings of Langland, Chaucer, and Dante. The syntopic discussion continues by viewing the syncretism of medieval Christendom against the classicism of Greece and Rome.

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the Honors Program and HON 201

HON 301 Seminar V: The Renaissance

Focuses on great works from the Renaissance, including the writings of Machiavelli, Montaigne, Pascal, Descartes, and Shakespeare. The syntopic discussion continues reflection on the relation between Renaissance thinkers and their Christian and classical predecessors.

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the Honors Program and HON 202

HON 302 Seminar VI: The Enlightenment

Focuses on great works from the Enlightenment, including the writings of Swift, Hobbes, Locke, Voltaire, Burke, and the founding fathers of the United States. The syntopic discussion continues weighing the influence of the critical ideas of the past during the beginnings of significant political and economic transition in the Western world.

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the Honors Program and HON 301

HON 401 Seminar VII: The 19th Century

Focuses on great works from the nineteenth century, including the writings of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche, and Newman. The syntopic discussion continues its critical comparison of ideas, attempting to appreciate the influence of the past on the beginnings of modernity.

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the Honors Program and HON 302

HON 402 Seminar VIII: The 20th Century

Examines the works of selected influential writers, profane and religious, from the 20th century, including Sartre, Camus, Eliot, and St. Pope John Paul II. In the future, some of these books may find their way securely onto the list of 'great books,' others may not. At any rate, the Honors Program comes to a close with an attempt to achieve some initial understanding of how our predecessors' ideas, good and bad, have shaped our own times.

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the Honors Program and HON 401

HST 105 History of Civilization I

Provide students with an appreciation and an understanding of how the four great traditions-the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, Judaism, and Christianity-formed Western civilization. The courses begin over four millennia before the birth of Jesus Christ with the ancient Near and Middle East background to Western civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley. They end with the shattering of European unity and the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century, Europe's global expansion, and the rise and the effects of science, religious wars, rationalism, the American and French Revolutions, nationalism, industrialism, liberalism, and communism.

3

HST 106 History of Civilization II

Provide students with an appreciation and an understanding of how the four great traditions-the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome, Judaism, and Christianity-formed Western civilization. The courses begin over four millennia before the birth of Jesus Christ with the ancient Near and Middle East background to Western civilization in Mesopotamia, Egypt, and the Indus Valley. They end with the shattering of European unity and the Protestant Reformation in the 16th century, Europe's global expansion, and the rise and the effects of science, religious wars, rationalism, the American and French Revolutions, nationalism, industrialism, liberalism, and communism.

3

HST 207 History of the United States I

Begin with the Age of European Discovery. Special attention is given to the origins and significance of Columbus' mission, and the Catholic missionary activity in the Americas during the 16th century. Beginning with the English dominance of the East Coast of North America, the courses follow the emergence and establishment of the United States as a republic, and its growth into a continental and then a world power. Among the courses' more prominent topics after 1763 are the Articles of Confederation, the United States Constitution of 1787, federalism, the American party systems, the growth of slavery, Jacksonian democracy and reform, the advance of liberalism, the War Between the Northern and Southern States, Reconstruction, the rise of industrialism, populism, progressivism, World War I, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the rise of conservatism, and the crisis of modern liberalism.

3

HST 208 History of the United States II

Begin with the Age of European Discovery. Special attention is given to the origins and significance of Columbus' mission, and the Catholic missionary activity in the Americas during the 16th century. Beginning with the English dominance of the East Coast of North America, the courses follow the emergence and establishment of the United States as a republic, and its growth into a continental and then a world power. Among the courses' more prominent topics after 1763 are the Articles of Confederation, the United States Constitution of 1787, federalism, the American party systems, the growth of slavery, Jacksonian democracy and reform, the advance of liberalism, the War Between the Northern and Southern States, Reconstruction, the rise of industrialism, populism, progressivism, World War I, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the rise of conservatism, and the crisis of modern liberalism.

3

HST 250 African-American History

Traces the struggle of the African-American to achieve equality within American society. Special emphasis will be placed upon the economic, political, and social developments of this struggle.

3

HST 290 Historical Methods

Is required for all history majors. It examines the meaning and matter of history. Students will carefully read introductory texts on historical method, complete a workbook of research assignments, learn and practice the particular craft of writing for history, and read excerpts from the works of great historians.

3

HST 295 History of Ohio

Begins with the settlement of the Ohio River Valley and the first contact between its indigenous peoples and European explorers and settlers. The course will also survey the frontier stages of the region and then examine the immigration patterns to Ohio; the relation of racial and ethnic groups; the role of religion in shaping the lives of the people of Ohio; the political traditions of Ohio and their relation to the wider politics of the United States; the growth of the state's main cities; and the growth of major industries, labor unions, and institutions of higher learning.

3

HST 300 Franciscans in History

Is an account of the Franciscan Movement, from the birth of St. Francis until modern times. The course traces the internal development of the three orders of St. Francis and the ways in which they influenced and were influenced by society. The course enables students to see the Spirit of God at work in the manifold development of Franciscan communities through the ages, and there will be special emphasis on the contribution of the Third Order Regular.

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 300

HST 301 St. Francis: Life and Charism

introduces the life of St. Francis through select writings of his Medieval biographers and examines his life within the social, political, and religious context of his time. The course explores his unique vision of life and the development of the Franciscan movement and the spirituality of the first, second and third order traditions up to the death of St. Bonaventure. Special consideration will be given to the Rule of the Third Order, the charism that inspired it, and the spirituality that it fosters.  Cross-listed with THE 301

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 301

HST 307 Franciscans in the New World

Is a study of the influence of the Franciscans in the Americas from the arrival of the first friar in 1493 until the present. The course will examine the missionary efforts of the Spanish Franciscans in New Spain and Florida, of the French Recollect Franciscans and Capuchins in Quebec and New France, and of the early Franciscans in English-speaking America. It will treat also of the establishment of new Franciscan provinces in America with the explosion of Catholic immigration in the nineteenth century and the founding of parishes, schools, colleges, seminaries, universities, and hospitals. The changes in religious life and activities since the Second Vatican Council will be explored.

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 307

HST 309 History and Spirituality of the Franciscan Third Order

(lay and religious) relates a treatment of the Franciscan Third Order's central charism- the penitential life-to the broader penitential movement in the Church. The course includes contemporary developments and applications, such as Third Order Rules.

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 309

HST 310 Church History-Lives of the Saints

Teaches students basic Church history via the lives of the saints and major events in the history of the Church from the earliest times to the present, through which a picture of the development of the Church is given.

3

HST 315 The Thought of BL. John Duns Scotus

Examines important themes and fundamental concepts in the broad-ranging thought of Bl. John Duns Scotus. This course includes significant study of primary texts as well as readings in ongoing scholarship concerning the Subtle Doctor, in both theology and philosophy. The course will focus on Scotus' distinctive metaphysical and logical contributions (such as the disjunctive transcendentals, the univocity of the concept of being, and the formal distinction) as well as his distinctive understanding of natural theology, natural law, and philosophical anthropology.  Cross-listed with THE 315

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 315

HST 316 Selected Topics in the Franciscan Tradition

Will focus on certain historical, philosophical, or theological aspects of the Franciscan determined by the professor.  Depending on the topic, this course may be cross-listed with THE 316

3

Cross Listed Courses

Depending on the topic, this course may be cross-listed with THE 316.

HST 317 History of Ancient Greece

Covers the history of Greece from the Minoans through the Hellenistic Age and its conquest by Rome (i.e., from ca. 2900 BC to 146 BC) and will include the political, military, social, economic, intellectual and religious aspects of Greek society. The course will address not only their great accomplishments in politics philosophy and literature, but also the effects of Greek culture on Western society to the present.

3

HST 318 The Roman Republic and Empire

Covers Roman civilization from the founding of Rome in 753 BC to its fall in the West in AD 476 and its transformation in the East into the Byzantine Empire by the time of Heraklios (AD 610-642), and will examine the political, military, social, economic, intellectual and religious aspects of Roman society, particularly as they related to the Jews and Christians in the imperial period. The course will analyze not only the great accomplishments of the Romans, but also the effects of Roan civilization on Western society.

3

HST 320 Ancient History

Is a survey of the ancient world beginning with the civilizations in the Fertile Crescent and ending with the fall of Rome, AD 476. Special emphasis will be placed on Hellenic, Hellenistic, and Roman contributions.

3

HST 323 The Medieval World

Is a study of Medieval times, including the development of such institutions as modern cities, trial by jury, and parliamentary government, from the fall of the empire of the West to the dawn of the modern period.

3

HST 324 Renaissance and Reformation

Details the rise of humanism and the bourgeoisie, the breakdown of Medieval unity, the age of exploration, and the causes of the Protestant Reformation; it also studies Luther, Calvin, and Henry VIII, the religious wars, the Catholic Reformation, and the Treaty of Westphalia.

3

HST 326 The Franciscan Intellectual Tradition

Introduces students to the intellectual patrimony of the followers of St. Francis. The course will give special attention to St. Bonaventure and Bl. John Duns Scotus, but may also consider great Franciscan masters, such as Anthony of Padua, Peter Olivi, William of Ockham, and Lawrence of Brindisi. The course will also give attention to uniquely Franciscan themes, such as the primacy of charity in the Christian life, the absolute predestination of Jesus and Mary, the Christocentric pattern of creation, the role of Immaculate Conception in the economy of redemption, and the nature of God's action in the Sacraments. Students will see how the Franciscan Intellectual Tradition represents a rich and dynamic guide to a deeper understanding of humanity's place in the world and its relationship with God.  Cross-listed with THE 326

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 326

HST 327 French Revolution and Nineteenth Century Europe

Begins with the Enlightenment and follows with the Austrian alliance, the Revolution, the wars of the Revolution, Napoleon, the Congress of Vienna, the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848, the unification of Germany and Italy, the new colonialism, and Britain and France in the 19th century.

3

HST 328 The Role of Women in Franciscan Tradition

This course will look at those women who were influential in the founding and growth of the Franciscan tradition. The students will look at women involved in the direct founding of congregations of women who follow both the Rule of St. Clare as well as those women who founded and continue to found active Third Order Regular congregations whose mission and apostolates were fundamental in Catholic health care and education in the 19th and 20th Centuries. In addition, the course will look at women involved the intellectual development of Franciscan life and thought.  Cross-listed with THE 328

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 328

HST 329 Twentieth Century Europe

Recognizes the continuing importance of Europe in the affairs of men. Students will study the history of Russia, Germany, the United Kingdom, France, and Italy since the turn of the last century with the opportunity to familiarize themselves with such current issues as Berlin, NATO, and European unity.

3

HST 331 Modern Britain and Ireland

Features an in-depth examination of British and Irish interaction with the religious, political, and economic developments of modern Europe. This course also addresses the Anglo-American transatlantic legacy within the context of the Atlantic World. Finally, this course will focus specifically on the articulation of Irish nationalism through political movements, cultural expression, and diasporic extension.

3

HST 332 The Thought of St. Bonaventure

Provides a treatment of Bonaventure's distinct philosophical and theological approach to questions on knowledge about God, creation, the Trinity, the Incarnation and Redemption and Christian spirituality as uniquely centered in Christ crucified.  Cross-listed with THE 332

2

Cross Listed Courses

THE 332

HST 333 Russia to 1917

Surveys the history of the rise of Russia from the beginnings of Kievan Rus' in the 9th century up to the revolutions of 1917. The course will examine such topics as the Mongol invasion, the rise of the autocracy, Peter the Great's westernization, the Great Reforms and the reasons for the fall of the Romanov dynasty.

3

HST 334 Modern Russia

Surveys the history of Russia from the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 through the present. The course will examine such topics as the role of Lenin in the Bolshevik Revolution, Stalin and the purges, the Cold War, the fall of Communism and the Russia of today.

3

HST 335 American Diplomatic History

Examines the history of American foreign policy, the influence of our political past and the underlying principles of our political order in shaping our foreign policy, the manner in which our foreign policy is formulated and implemented by the legislative and executive branches, the connection between our foreign and defense politics, and the nature of current and recent American foreign policy. Special attention will be given to the moral considerations that have influenced American foreign policy.  Cross-listed with POL 335

3

Cross Listed Courses

POL 335

HST 336 The American Political Tradition

Studies key writings of America's greatest political thinkers and the most noteworthy commentators on the American political order. Among the thinkers who may be studied are the Founding Fathers, Alexis de Tocqueville, John C. Calhoun, Abraham Lincoln, Orestes Brownson; John Courtney Murray, SJ, Irving Babbitt, Leo Strauss, Eric Voegelin, Russell Kirk, Gerhart Niemeyer, and the Southern Agrarians. Attention may also be given to the nature of American liberalism and conservatism. Cross-listed with POL 336

3

Cross Listed Courses

POL 336

HST 340 Colonial America

Probes the Spanish, Dutch, and French settlements, and the establishment of the thirteen English colonies in the 17th and 18th centuries beginning with the foundations at Jamestown and Plymouth. The development of local self-government, intercolonial relations, the mother country, maritime affairs, agriculture, social life, and relations with neighboring French and Spanish colonies are among the topics treated.

3

HST 345 America: From Independence to Civil War, 1776-1860

Begins with a review of the events leading up to the American War for Independence and ends with the election of Abraham Lincoln. The course pays close attention to the original intentions of the American founders, the social and cultural life of the early republic, the War of 1812, the upsurge in American nationalism, the formation of northern and southern societies, slavery, industrialization, Jacksonian democracy, the emergence of the Whigs, the rise of the West, the Mexican-American War, and the prelude to the Civil War.

3

HST 355 Civil War and Reconstruction

Begins with the Wilmont Proviso and follows the slavery controversy of the fifties, the election of 1860, and secession. The military aspects of the Civil War are studied in detail and developments behind the line, North and South, are noted. The Reconstruction period is covered thoroughly along with political developments to the election of Hayes.

3

HST 360 America from 1877-1941

Examines post-Reconstruction politics and society; the rise of big business and the concentration of economic power; populism; progressivism; American entry into World War I; the new importance of organizations in American life; the rise of organized labor; the Great Depression; and the New Deal.

3

HST 362 World War I

Ushered in the age of total war and, as the first truly modern war, it presents crucial lessons: on strategic planning and its associated pitfalls; on the resilience of modern states; on the demands of great power conflict; and on the awesome spectacle of modern, total war. This course will examine not only the military history of the century's first industrialized war, but also the causes of the war, the role of ideology, economics, geography, leadership, and technology and how each of these elements came together in a unique way to make the Great War a war of unprecedented cost and a pivot between the old world and the modern world.

3

HST 363 World War II

Was the largest and most destructive war in the history of the world. Beginning with the formation of Fascism and Nazism in Europe, the course leads students to a narrative explanation of the events of the war and an analysis of the causes and costs of the Allied victory. Attention will also be given to various political, social, and economic aspects of Home Front activities, the Holocaust, the Axis occupation of various countries, Resistance Movements, and the unprecedented suffering that World War II inflicted on non-combatants worldwide.

3

HST 365 Contemporary American History

Is a study of the history of the United States from the Second World War until the present. Topics will include World War II; the Cold War; the Korean, Vietnam, and Persian Gulf Wars; McCarthyism; the Beats; the rise of the New Left; the Civil Rights Movement; the collapse of the New Deal Coalition; the rise of Conservatism; and post-industrialism.

3

HST 366 Korea and Vietnam

Were major segments of the Cold War that lasted from 1947 to 1989. Understanding the social, political, military, and diplomatic causes and consequences is critical to a better understanding of today's world in terms of the legacies that continue to mold and form American internal and international policies both at home and around the globe. Beginning with the rise of postwar Asian communist nationalism, the Truman Doctrine, and NSC-68, the course leads students to a narrative explanation of the events and a critical analysis of the causes and costs of the Allied de termination to halt communist expansion in Asia. Students will also investigate various political, social, and economic aspects of Home Front activities, the Antiwar Movement, the Great Society, the Nixon Doctrine, the Paris Peace Accord of 1973, and the suffering of the innocents.

3

HST 370 History of Latin America

Surveys the development of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to the present. Emphasis will be on the religious, political, social, and economic development of the region, with particular attention to the growth of nationalism and the independence movements.

3

HST 375 American Labor History

Traces the growth of labor in America from the colonial period to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the development of organized labor since the Civil War and its place in American society. The colonial period, the transitional period, labor and the Civil War, the Knights of Labor, the American Federation of Labor, the Congress of Industrial Organization, and modern unionism are among the topics treated.

3

HST 385 History of Africa

Is a survey study of primarily sub-Saharan Africa: the ancient kingdoms, early and later European explorations, the various slave trades, imperialism and colonialism, and the recent movements for national independence.

3

HST 386 History of Islam to ca. AD 1200

Will examine the history of the third great Western monotheistic religion: Islam. The course will examine the political, military, social, economic, intellectual and religious aspects of Islam, particularly as they relate to Western civilization and the Jews and Christians up to ca. AD 1200. The course will provide the historical background to Islam in the modern world by examining its origin, growth and development, expansion into both the Mediterranean basin as well as its movement eastward into India, and its division into Sunni and Shi'ite branches (among others) and will include not only the military interactions between Christianity and Islam, but also the cultural and intellectual interactions.

3

HST 390 History of the Far East

Surveys the background and development of Eastern civilizations, among them Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Indian. The course examines the main features of the region's religious, political, social, and economic development, with particular attention to the influence of the West, and the various responses to this influence.

3

HST 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in history. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally juniors and seniors with a 2.5 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

History junior or senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be preapproved.

HST 412 Film and Western Culture

Is designed to survey the aesthetic, historical, and theoretical aspects of film studies, as a means of appreciating the role of film in modern Western culture, and especially to prepare the student to engage effectively, through this unique medium, historical periods, events, and persons worthy of consideration in the history and culture of the West in general, and Catholic Christian culture in particular. This effort will be accomplished by introducing the student to the history and basic techniques of film making, and by critically evaluating the subject matter of key films in both their historical context and their topical perspective. Through the judicious use of film the integration of faith, reason, and culture will be enhanced as the student engages, in a modern and distinctive liberal arts manner, the best of Western and Christian culture.

3

Cross Listed Courses

HCC 412/ FLM 412

HST 435 Coordinating Seminar

Is a required course for all history majors focusing on applying their knowledge of history and the principles and methods of writing history. The outcome of this course is an extensively researched and well-written thesis that draws significantly on primary historical sources. Students are encouraged to access the historical materials in the archives and libraries of the city of Steubenville and other localities in the University's immediate area. Students must have their topics approved by a member of the history faculty before they begin their research and writing, and they must consult closely with a faculty member at each stage in the development of their theses.

1

Prerequisites

HST 290

LAT 103 Introductory Studies in Latin I

Introduce the fundamental morphology, lexicon, and syntax of the Latin language. Classical Latin is the basis of instruction, but the historical changes of the language are taken into account. Thus, the student will begin to acquire not only the classical language, which was the basis of all subsequent developments, but also will learn about the changes that occurred in Late Latin and Ecclesiastical Latin. Students will also read short selections from classical and ecclesiastical authors, as well as from the Vulgate.

3

LAT 104 Introductory Studies in Latin II

Introduce the fundamental morphology, lexicon, and syntax of the Latin language. Classical Latin is the basis of instruction, but the historical changes of the language are taken into account. Thus, the student will begin to acquire not only the classical language, which was the basis of all subsequent developments, but also will learn about the changes that occurred in Late Latin and Ecclesiastical Latin. Students will also read short selections from classical and ecclesiastical authors, as well as from the Vulgate.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 103

LAT 203 Intermediate Studies in Latin I

Review and augment the grammar learned in the first year. Students will also read longer selections from classical authors, from the Vulgate, and from ecclesiastical authors, such as those found in Wheelock's Latin Reader.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 104. Evidence of intermediate-level proficiency is required for further Latin courses.

LAT 204 Intermediate Studies in Latin II

Review and augment the grammar learned in the first year. Students will also read longer selections from classical authors, from the Vulgate, and from ecclesiastical authors, such as those found in Wheelock's Latin Reader.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 203. Evidence of intermediate-level proficiency is required for further Latin courses.

LAT 207 I Intensive Summer Latin

Is offered as part of the Summer Ancient and Biblical Languages Institute and is designed to provide an intensive study of Latin. Students will complete Moreland and Fleischer's Latin, an intensive course, and read one short oration of Cicero, for example, the "First Catilinarian," as well as selections from the Vulgate. This course may be taken only by permission of the department, and requires a separate application to the Institute. This course satisfies the university's language requirement.

12

LAT 301 Survey of Latin Prose

Is designed for the reading of selections of Latin prose of various genres and periods from a comprehensive anthology such as Russell's Anthology of Latin Prose. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the major styles of Latin prose from early classical to Christian patristic authors. This course is required of majors and minors.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 302 Latin Prose Composition

Focuses on practical exercises to develop correct and fluent expressionin written Latin prose and to explore in a deeper way the nature of language itself. This course is required of majors and shall be offered every third semester.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 301

LAT 311 Virgil

Is designed for reading the Eclogues, the Georgics, and the Aeneid, and to introduce students to the impact of Virgil on subsequent thinkers and poets. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 321 Horace

Is designed for the reading of the poet who, after Virgil, has been arguably the most influential poet upon Christian Humanism. In the Middle Ages his Satires and Epistles were most read, while in the Renaissance the Epodes and Odes were brought to the fore again. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 331 Roman Philosophy

Is designed for the reading of the Roman philosophers in any of the genres in which they wrote. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 341 Cicero

Is designed for the reading of the works of Cicero, either a major long work or selections of the various genres into which his corpus falls, in order to introduce the student to the high classical standard of his prose and to the influence of his thought on subsequent thinkers. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 351 The Roman Historians

Is designed for the reading of selections from the Roman historians, especially Livy and Tacitus, to introduce the student to Latin historical prose, to the methods of historical investigation practiced by Roman historians, and to the impact their practice had on subsequent thinkers, especially those who were themselves historians. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 361 Alii Romani

Is designed for the reading of poets, dramatists, and prose writers who have influenced the humanist tradition in specific ways, but are not otherwise covered in the curriculum, notably Terence, Ovid, Juvenal, and Seneca. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 371 Liturgical Latin

Is designed for the reading in Latin of the Vulgate, the Breviary, and the Mass in the "duo usus unici ritus romani". This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 380 The Latin Fathers

Is designed for the reading of the Church Fathers who wrote in Latin. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LAT 390 Medieval Latin

Is designed either for the reading of selections from medieval authors, such as those found in Sidwell's anthology Reading Medieval Latin, or for the closer reading of a single medieval author. This course may be repeated once, if the faculty determine that the material covered is substantially different from that of the student's previous enrollment. The material covered will be announced as part of the course title.

3

Prerequisites

LAT 204

LST 102 Legal Research, Writing, and Ethics

Introduces students to both print and online legal sources; use of the law library; and legal writing style, legal citation method, and the drafting of legal documents (such as briefs, motions, wills, real property documents). Researching of case, statutory, regulatory, and administrative law materials are included. Legal ethics, as it pertains to lawyers and other legal professionals, will also be addressed in this course.

3

LST 201 Survey of American Law I

Examines the basic principles, history, and leading case precedents in the fields of contracts, torts, and criminal law. American law in these fields is also considered in light of natural law, human life issues and Catholic social and moral teaching. Attention is also given to the nature of the legal process, the elements of a legal case, the structure and functions of American courts, and alternative dispute resolution.

3

LST 202 Survey of American Law II

Examines the basic principles, history, and leading case precedents in the fields of property, constitutional law, and family law. American law in these fields is also considered in light of natural law, human life issues, and Catholic social and moral teaching. Attention is also given to the nature of the legal process, the elements of a legal case, the structure and functions of American courts, and alternative dispute resolution.

3

LST 301 Natural Law

Studies the notion of natural law and its relationship to human law and the political order. It examines the natural law tradition from its classical expressions to the great Catholic tradition of natural law to its substantial influence on the Anglo-American common law to its role in influencing the American Revolution and constitutional tradition. The contrast between the classical/Christian tradition of natural law and its modern expression is discussed. The course also considers how modern legal thinking has diverged from the natural law tradition, and how the clash between natural law and positivistic conceptions of law and morality is vividly seen in many current public issues and legal questions.

3

Prerequisites

While not a prerequisite, it is recommended that students take POL 101 before enrolling in this course.

Cross Listed Courses

POL 301

LST 303 History of Law

Is a broad survey of the ideas and systems of law, including the development of Roman law as the basis of many of the law codes of modern Europe and a survey of the development of the common law of England, which is the basis of much of American law and the law of several other countries with English roots. The course will also consider an historical and philosophical comparison between the development of these two systems.

3

LST 404 Law and Economics

Applies the methods of economics to the analysis of the structure of the common law, legal process, legal institutions, and statutory regulations and considers the impact of law on the behavior of individuals, groups, and the economy. Topics include the nature of economic reasoning and the economic approach to law; property rights in economics and law; torts and tort liability; legal processes; crime and punishment; and variable topics subject to instructor and student interest.

3

Cross Listed Courses

ECO 404

LST 407 Internship

Will give students the opportunity to work under the direction of a lawyer, judge, or lawmaker by doing research, assisting in the preparation of legal documents, and taking part in other law-related work. Students will also experience the routine activity of lawyers and assist in the operation of a law office or that of other law-related practitioners or an organization dedicated to human life issues.

1-6

Prerequisites

Completion of LST 102, LST 201, and LST 202

LST 408 Selected Themes in Legal Studies

Treats in-depth an area of the law, legal issues, a law-related topic, legal thinker, or school of jurisprudential thought which sometimes will be done in relation to human life issues. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different from when previously taken.

3

MIL 101 Intro to Military Science/Leadership, Part 1

Begins the introductory leadership and management instruction with the ROTC Basic Course (first and second years of the four-year program), and introduces students to the Army's organization, history, and unique leadership challenges. The course is organized into three main sections covering the Army's organization, officership and communications, leadership, and ethics and values. The use of practical exercise is stressed as students are required to first display an understanding of presented ideas and concepts and then further develop their skills through use in their own work. Pass/Fail grading

2

MIL 102 Intro to Military Science/Leadership, Part 2

Continues the introductory-level leadership and management instruction within the ROTC Basic Course (first and second years of the four-year program) and continues to introduce tasks commonly required of Army lieutenants. The course is organized into three main sections covering common task training, land navigation, and mission planning. The use of practical exercise is stressed, as students are required to display and understand presented ideas and concepts, and then further develop their skills through use in their own work. Pass/ Fail grading

2

MIL 201 Application of Military Science/Leadership, Part 1

Constitutes the principal leadership and management instruction within the ROTC Basic Course (first and second years of the four-year program), while integrating communication and planning skills as they relate to small unit leadership. Topics of discussion and study include taking charge of small groups, troop leading procedures, introductory small unit tactics, planning and order formats, leadership communication skills, and evaluations. The use of practical exercise is stressed, as students continue to expand and exercise leadership skills introduced in previous courses. The use of leadership labs will continue to train students in individual-level military skills, introductory leadership tasks, and will also serve as an environment for students to exercise and experiment with their own leadership styles. Pass/Fail grading

2

MIL 202 Application of Military Science/Leadership, Part 2

Completes the principal leadership and management instruction within the ROTC Basic Course (first and second years of the four-year program) while integrating communication and planning skills as they relate to small unit leadership. Topics of discussion and study include the evolution of officership within the Army from the Army's beginning through today, introductory small unit tactics, and planning small unit operations. The use of practical exercise is stressed, as students continue to expand and exercise leadership skills introduced in previous courses. Pass/Fail grading

2

MIL 203 Leader's Training Course

Is an intensive five-week leadership development course run completely by every Army Military Science and Leadership Department nationwide. The course is run in multiple iterations at Ft. Knox, Kentucky, with the purpose of providing an alternate means for college students to meet prerequisites to enter 3000-level Military Science and Leadership courses at colleges and universities nationwide. While enrolled, students are placed in an intensive training environment where they live, work, and learn in a cooperative group under 24-hour-a-day leadership instruction and assessment. Upon successful completion of the course, students return to their campuses and are able to contract to enter into the third year of the four-year Military Science & Leadership program. Pass/Fail grading

2

MIL 301 Application Leadership/Tactical PL Part 1

Will provide the cadet with instruction and practical experience in tactical and technical military topics. The entire year will emphasize leadership development and application. The course content is structured from the Officer Foundation Standards (OFS) and instructional guidance from the United States Army ROTC Cadet Command. Pass/ Fail grading

3

Prerequisites

MIL 101, MIL 102, MIL 201, and MIL 202 or MIL 203

MIL 302 Advanced Leadership/Tactical PL Part 2

Will provide the cadet with instruction and practical experience in tactical and technical military topics. The entire year will emphasize leadership development and application. The course content is structured from the Officer Foundation Standards (OFS) and instructional guidance from the United States Army ROTC Cadet Command. Pass/Fail grading

3

Prerequisites

MIL 301

MIL 303 Leadership Development/ Assessment Course

Is an intensive five-week leadership course located at Ft. Lewis, Washington. Students travel at the Army's expense and integrate into groups of 36 students from college and university Military Science & Leadership Programs across the country. Students rotate through leadership positions, supervising their peers through both academic and tactical activities in both garrison and field environments. Students are under leadership evaluation 24 hours a day for the duration of the course. Upon successfully completing the course, students receive a detailed appraisal of their leadership performance and return to their campus programs qualified to enter the MSL-4 Military Science & Leadership courses. Pass/Fail grading

3

Prerequisites

MIL 302

MIL 401 Officership, Command & Staff 1

Develops student proficiency in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and mentoring subordinates. Students explore training management, methods of effective staff collaboration, and developmental counseling techniques. Pass/Fail grading

3

Prerequisites

MIL 302

MIL 402 Officership, Command & Staff 2

Includes case study analysis of military law and practical exercises on establishing an ethical command climate. Students must complete a semester long Senior Leadership Project that requires them to plan, organize, collaborate, analyze, and demonstrate their leadership skills. Pass/Fail grading

3

Prerequisites

MIL 401

ML 201 Intermediate Modern Languages

Allows students with proficiency in a modern foreign language to receive credit by scoring on a special examination at a level consistent with Modern Language Department standards. (See Credit by Exam for details.)

6

ML 202 Intermediate Modern Languages

Allows students with proficiency in a modern foreign language to receive credit by scoring on a special examination at a level consistent with Modern Language Department standards. (See Credit by Exam for details.)

6

MTH 120 Survey of Mathematics

Is an introduction to various topics in mathematics designed to teach critical thinking and to impart a general knowledge and appreciation of mathematics. Topics will be selected from logic, geometry, linear and exponential growth, personal finance, discrete mathematics, probability, statistics, and social choice theory.

3

MTH 121 Mathematics for Early and Middle Grade Teachers I

includes such topics as an introduction to problem solving, set theory, functions, logic, numeration systems, and other number bases, and an overview of the real number system with its subsystems and related properties. Historical development and mathematical connections are stressed. The course is only for majors pursuing early and middle childhood, intervention specialist, and adolescent to young adult licensure, other than mathematics.

3

MTH 122 Mathematics for Early and Middle Grade Teachers II

Provides application of real and complex numbers, algebraic thinking, Cartesian coordinate system, computing interest, probability and multistage experiments, statistics, and geometry, utilizing graphic calculators, and stressing the historical. This course is only for majors pursuing early and middle childhood or intervention specialist licensure.

3

MTH 123 MATH/AYA Mathematics

Explores an overview of linear regressions, recursive powers, matrices, definite integrals, statistics, trigonometry and transformations using the TI Smartview CE. Explores constructions for geometry, conjectures, triangular centers, graphs and functions, transformational symmetry, iterations, sine wave tracers, ovals, and logarithmic curves using the Geometer's Sketchpad. Utilizes Fathom Statistical Software for data surveys, correlation coefficients, scatter plots, and sums of squares.

3

MTH 155 Finite Mathematics

Is an introduction to mathematical topics and applications required by many college-level major programs. The material covered includes equations, inequalities, systems of linear equations and matrices, linear programming, mathematics of finance and probability.

3

Prerequisites

1 year of high school algebra

MTH 156 Applied Calculus

Is intended to follow MTH 155. Topics include precalculus review, functions, limits differentiation and application of the derivative, and integration and applications of the integral.

3

Prerequisites

2 years of high school algebra

MTH 160 Precalculus

Presents selected topics from algebra and elementary functions as preparation for studying calculus.

3

Prerequisites

2 years of high school mathematics including algebra and plane geometry

MTH 161 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I

Studies inequalities, relations, functions, graphs, straight lines, limits and continuity, differentiation, and the definite integral. Students will complete computer symbolic algebra (e.g. Maple) experiments. Historical and career information is included.

4

Prerequisites

Three years of high school mathematics including two years of algebra or MTH 160

MTH 162 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II

Studies conics, trigonometric and exponential functions, parametric equation and arc length, polar coordinates, infinite series, and methods of integration and applications. Students will complete symbolic algebra (e.g. Maple) experiments.

4

Prerequisites

MTH 161

MTH 171 Matrix Theory I

Focuses on elementary matrix algebra, which has become an integral part of the mathematical background necessary for such diverse fields as electrical engineering, education, chemistry and sociology, as well as for statistics, computer science, and pure mathematics. Application is made to the solution of linear systems.

1

Corequisites

MTH 161

MTH 172 Matrix Theory II

Continues with the applications of matrix algebra to the solution of linear systems and to linear transformations on abstract vector spaces. A special emphasis is placed on applications to computer science.

1

Prerequisites

MTH 171

Corequisites

MTH 162

MTH 179 History of Mathematics

Provides an introduction and philosophical development of mathematics related to number and number concepts, algebra, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, calculus, discrete mathematics, statistics and probability, and measurement and measurement systems, including contributions from diverse cultures.

1

MTH 210 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry

Begins with a close study of portions of Euclid's Elements, including complete coverage of the first book. The historical impact of his axiomatic approach and its ultimate refinement in Hilbert's axioms will be explored. This course will cover some of the history of the attempts to prove the Parallel Postulate, leading up to the discovery of non-Euclidian geometries in the 19th century. The two main models of non-Euclidean geometries (elliptic and hyperbolic) will be described and some of their properties investigated. Finally, the history of geometry since the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries (e.g. Kline's Erlanger Program) will be briefly covered.

3

Prerequisites

One year of high school geometry or MTH 134

MTH 220 Discrete Mathematics

Surveys proof techniques, recursion, induction, modeling, and algorithmic thinking. Other topics covered include set theory, discrete number systems, combinatorics, graph theory, Boolean algebra, and a variety of applications. There is an emphasis on oral and written communication of mathematical ideas, cooperative learning, and the proofs of mathematical conjectures.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 161

MTH 261 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III

Considers solid analytic geometry, vectors, partial differentiation, and multiple integration. Students will use graphing calculators and will complete computer symbolic algebra (e.g. MAPLE) experiments.

4

Prerequisites

MTH 162

MTH 265 Differential Equations

Presents ordinary differential equations and their applications with an emphasis on techniques of solution including numerical methods.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 261

MTH 270 Chaos and Fractals

Examines the mathematics behind two fascinating and inter-related topics, fractals and chaos. Chaos and fractals are components of dynamics, a subject that studies how systems change over time. Through computer experimentation and simulations, students will experience how new mathematics is developed. Topics covered include fractals: feedback and the iterator; classical fractals and self-similarity; length, area, and dimension; fractals with a random component; recursive structures including L-systems; attractors; deterministic chaos; fixed points, stable and unstable; and the period-doubling route to chaos.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 162, MTH 172 and at least 1 computer course

MTH 305 Introduction to Abstract Algebra

Develops the structural concepts that characterize abstract algebra. Topics in this course will be selected from the following: elementary number theory, groups, rings, integral domain, fields, and vector spaces. There is an emphasis on the oral and written communication of mathematical ideas. Students will frequently work in groups on special projects.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 161- MTH 162, MTH 220

MTH 311 Linear Programming

Covers both the theory and applications of linear programming, one of the leading methods for large-scale optimization. The simplex method will be studied in detail. Applications include product mix, diet, transportation, and network flow problems. Integer programming will be touched on briefly. Computer tools such as spreadsheet solvers will be introduced and used.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 220

MTH 330 Number Theory and Cryptography

Covers the fundamental algorithms used in both private key and public key cryptography. Algorithms covered will include DES, AES, Diffie-Hellman, and RSA. Traditional encryption methods such as Vigenere ciphers and their cryptanalysis will be briefly described. The number theory needed to understand primality testing and RSA encryption will be developed in detail. Several programming projects aimed at implementing some of the material will be given throughout the semester.

3

Prerequisites

CSC 141, CSC 144, CSC 171 or CSC 280; and MTH 220

Cross Listed Courses

CSC 330

MTH 333 Intermediate Linear Algebra

Is a course in finite dimensional vector spaces and linear transformations, including inner product spaces, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 162, MTH 172, MTH 220

MTH 335 Junior Seminar

Is designed to teach mathematical science majors the skills necessary to learn mathematics on their own and communicate their knowledge to others in oral and written form. All students will attend presentations made by senior mathematics students. Students will be required to write a short, independently-researched paper and present it to the other students in the junior seminar.

1

MTH 391 Advanced Calculus for Applications

Covers the topics of vector field theory, Fourier series, and partial differential equations.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 265

MTH 400 Internship

is a work experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in mathematical science.  The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally seniors with a 2.5 quality point average.  Students are approved individually by the academic department.  A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall.  Internships count as general electives. 

1-6

Prerequisites

Mathematical science junior or senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be pre-approved.

MTH 401 Mathematical Statistics I

Introduces a statistical basis for decision making to the student of applied science in this modern tool of analysis. This will be accomplished by studies in probability theory for both discrete and continuous sample spaces and in an introduction to statistical inference.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 161- MTH 162

MTH 402 Mathematical Statistics II

Is a continuation of MTH 401, covering additional concepts and techniques of statistics with an emphasis on problem-solving approaches.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 401

MTH 408 Introduction to Functions of a Complex Variable

Liberates the mathematician from the restrictions imposed by the domain of real numbers when the broader field of complex numbers is made available. Beginning with a study of complex numbers, this course introduces the algebra and the calculus of elementary functions.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 261

MTH 420 Introduction to Real Analysis

Gives a theoretical presentation of the real numbers, sequences, and their limits, including lim sup and lim inf; continuity; sequences of functions and pointwise and uniform convergence; and the (point set) topology of the reals.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 220 and MTH 261

MTH 430 Numerical Analysis

Provides students with an intuitive and working understanding of numerical methods of problem solving, an appreciation of the concept of error and the need to control it, and the ability to implement numerical methods using a computer. Topics include: approximation of functions, interpolation, error analysis, numerical integration and differentiation, numerical linear algebra, and numerical solutions to differential equations.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 161- MTH 162 and either CSC 141, CSC 144 or CSC 280

MTH 434 Senior Thesis

Requires all mathematical science students to write a thesis on an approved mathematical topic. Students must consult closely with a departmental faculty member at each stage in the development of their theses. The thesis will be presented to students in the Junior Seminar.

1

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music

Is designed for the student with no previous training in music, or as a review for those who have had limited contact with music. Basic elements-melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic-will be covered. Students will learn how to read musical notation and will gain familiarity with the keyboard, with harmony, and with creating music. The course will incorporate training in sight singing and ear training.

3

MUS 107 Ear Training I

Will equip students with aural skills required of professional musicians. The content of the course will complement the written theoretical skills cultivated in MUS 109: Theory & Analysis I. Specific attention will be given to the identification of intervals and chords, the ability to sing any interval on command, the ability to dictate melodies, rhythms, and harmonic progressions, and the ability to sing melodies at sight.The course must be taken in sequence concurrently with MUS 109, although students may test out of MUS 107 by taking a placement test at the beginning of the fall semester. This course is required of Sacred Music majors and minors.

1

MUS 108 Ear Training II

Will equip students with aural skills required of professional musicians. The content of the course will complement the written theoretical skills cultivated in MUS 110: Theory & Analysis II. Specific attention will be given to the identification of intervals and chords, the ability to sing any interval on command, the ability to dictate melodies, rhythms, and harmonic progressions, and the ability to sing melodies at sight. The course must be taken in sequence concurrently with MUS 110. This course is required of Sacred Music majors and minors.

1

MUS 109 Theory and Analysis I

Gives students a grounding in musical praxis, notation, tonal harmony, formal analysis, counterpoint, and composition. Combined with MUS 110, MUS 209, and MUS 210, it is required of sacred music majors and MUS 109 and MUS 110 are required of sacred music minors. The courses must be taken in sequence; however, students may test out of MUS 109 by taking a placement test at the beginning of the fall semester.

3

MUS 110 Theory and Analysis II

Gives students a grounding in musical praxis, notation, tonal harmony, formal analysis, counterpoint, and composition. Combined with MUS 109, MUS 209, and MUS 210, it is required of sacred music majors and MUS 109 and MUS 110 are required of sacred music minors. The courses must be taken in sequence.

3

MUS 111 Guitar Class I

Stresses basic techniques of playing the guitar and the functional application of these techniques to enable the student to use the guitar as an accompaniment instrument.

1

MUS 112 Guitar Class II

Is a continuation of Guitar Class I with further development of accompaniment techniques, along with providing the necessary skills to use the guitar as a tool for the teaching of music.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 111 or permission of instructor

MUS 115 Voice Class

Is an introduction to the techniques of singing including posture, breathing, pitch matching, interval recognition, and other areas related to ear training and sight singing.

1

MUS 120 Diction for Singers I: Latin and Italian Diction

Gives students a grounding in the rules governing the pronunciation of Latin and Italian in solo and choral repertoire. Students will learn the symbols of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and its application to lyric diction. Practical usage will be emphasized through in-class performances and text preparation.

1

MUS 121 Diction for Singers II: German Diction

Gives students an understanding of the rules governing the pronunciation of German and its applications to vocal repertoire. Students will learn the IPA symbols and sounds unique to the German language and its application to lyric diction. Practical usage will be emphasized through in-class performances and text preparation.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 120

MUS 122 Diction for Singers III: French Diction

Gives students a grounding in the rules governing the pronunciation of French and the differences between spoken and lyric French. Students will learn the IPA symbols and sounds of the French language as well as the rules governing elision and liaison. Practical usage will be emphasized through in- class performances and text preparation.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 120 and MUS 121

MUS 170 Organ I

(Major Instrument) helps organ majors to achieve a high level of competency in their instrument. Entrance into the major presupposes at least an intermediate level of keyboard proficiency. An organ major should be able to demonstrate a varied and professional level of ability upon graduation. In organ study, students will be required to perform representative pieces from the organ literature of the past five centuries and will be active accompanying the Schola Cantorum Franciscana at liturgies and occasionally leading congregational song. Seven semesters of instruction on the primary instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum is required of all sacred music majors. In addition, the various skills required to play the organ in the liturgy will constitute a part of organ study. Attendance at weekly performance class is required of all organ majors and will include the study of improvisation, figured bass, solo accompanying, congregational accompanying, performance practice, arranging, organ design and history, and organ literature.

3

MUS 171 Organ II

(Major Instrument) helps organ majors to achieve a high level of competency in their instrument. Entrance into the major presupposes at least an intermediate level of keyboard proficiency. An organ major should be able to demonstrate a varied and professional level of ability upon graduation. In organ study, students will be required to perform representative pieces from the organ literature of the past five centuries and will be active accompanying the Schola Cantorum Franciscana at liturgies and occasionally leading congregational song. Seven semesters of instruction on the primary instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum is required of all sacred music majors. In addition, the various skills required to play the organ in the liturgy will constitute a part of organ study. Attendance at weekly performance class is required of all organ majors and will include the study of improvisation, figured bass, solo accompanying, congregational accompanying, performance practice, arranging, organ design and history, and organ literature.

3

MUS 172 Voice I

(Major Instrument) For first-year students. Expects majors to achieve a high level of ability in their area of study. Entrance into the program presupposes at least an intermediate level of ability, and voice majors should be able to demonstrate a professional level of ability upon graduation. Seven semesters of instruction on the major instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum are required of all sacred music majors. Attendance at weekly performance class is required. Additional diction classes will also be required of voice majors as part of their private study.

3

MUS 173 Voice II

(Major Instrument) For first-year students. Expects majors to achieve a high level of ability in their area of study. Entrance into the program presupposes at least an intermediate level of ability, and voice majors should be able to demonstrate a professional level of ability upon graduation. Seven semesters of instruction on the major instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum are required of all sacred music majors. Attendance at weekly performance class is required. Additional diction classes will also be required of voice majors as part of their private study.

3

MUS 174 Organ I

(Non-Majors) students will need to demonstrate at least intermediate keyboard proficiency before beginning study. Weekly lessons will introduce students to the unique technical challenges of the instrument as well as registration and basic pipe organ design. Attendance at weekly performance class is encouraged. This course may be repeated.

1

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor

MUS 175 Schola Cantorum Franciscana

Is required of all sacred music majors (three years), and all singers in the community are encouraged to audition. For sacred music majors, Schola Cantorum constitutes the formal element of their sacred music practicum in that its purpose is the performance of sacred music in the liturgy. It will also be the laboratory for the choral conducting students' final projects and for organists, who will have ample opportunity for supervised accompanying and leading congregational song. The group meets twice per week with an additional sectional for men and women. This course may be repeated.

1

Prerequisites

Audition is required of non-majors

MUS 176 Voice I

(Non-majors) is required of all organ majors to fulfill their secondary instrument requirement. Priority will be given to music majors and minors in admitting students for instruction, and the number of secondary voice students taken additionally will depend upon the availability of the voice teacher. Attendance at weekly performance class is encouraged. This course may be repeated.

1

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor

MUS 180 Franciscan Chamber Music Society

Exists for the promotion of classical vocal and instrumental music performance at the University. Franciscan Chamber Music Society comprises small chamber ensembles from a single soloist to four or five musicians. Ensembles perform at least once per semester. This course may be taken for credit or for no credit and may be repeated. (up to 6 credits may be earned)

1

Prerequisites

Admission by audition and permission of the director

MUS 182 Chorus

Involves the study and performance of choral literature. Chorus has two rehearsal sessions per week and performs for University functions.

1

Prerequisites

Audition

MUS 183 Piano

Lessons will be given to voice majors and music minors, and additional lessons may be given based on the availability of the piano teachers. Voice majors are required to take at least two semesters of piano or organ. This course may be repeated.

1

Prerequisites

Permission of the instructor

MUS 185 Franciscan Chamber Orchestra

Plays classical works for string and wind instruments. The orchestra performs at least once per semester. This course may be taken for credit or for no credit and may be repeated.

1

Prerequisites

Admission by audition and permission of the director

MUS 186 Franciscan Brass Ensemble

Is comprised of any combination available of trumpet, trombone, baritone, euphonium, French horn, and tuba. The ensemble plays for at least one event per semester. This course may be taken for credit or for no credit and may be repeated. (up to 6 credits may be earned)

1

Prerequisites

Admission by audition and permission of the director

MUS 204 Music Appreciation

Employs a listening approach for understanding musical styles, forms, and compositions as related to musical history.

3

MUS 207 Music Ministry Practicum

This practicum is an opportunity for students in the Music Ministry Minor to apply pastoral principles and musical skills necessary to do effective music ministry.  Practicum opportunities include, but are not limited to, playing Mass for the chapel, being a part of the Festival of Praise music team, or being a part of the Nights of Praise and Worship music team for a semester.  Auditions are necessary to be a part of these ensembles.

1

Prerequisites

Pre-requisites: CAT 120, CAT 207, MUS 107, MUS 108, MUS 109, MUS 110 and THE 418

MUS 209 Theory and Analysis III

Give students a grounding in musical praxis, notation, tonal harmony, formal analysis, counterpoint, composition, ear-training and sight-singing. Combined with MUS 109 and MUS 110, all four courses are required of sacred music majors and MUS 109 and MUS 110 are required of sacred music minors. The courses must be taken in sequence; however, students may test out of MUS 109 by taking a placement test at the beginning of the fall semester.

3

Prerequisites

MUS 109, MUS 110.

MUS 210 Theory and Analysis IV

Give students a grounding in musical praxis, notation, tonal harmony, formal analysis, counterpoint, composition, ear-training and sight-singing. Combined with MUS 109 and MUS 110, all four courses are required of sacred music majors and MUS 109 and MUS 110 are required of sacred music minors. The courses must be taken in sequence; however, students may test out of MUS 109 by taking a placement test at the beginning of the fall semester.

3

Prerequisites

MUS 109, MUS 110.

MUS 211 Guitar Class III

Is an introductory course in classical guitar to train students to progress beyond simple folk strumming and to begin mastery of the guitar as a solo instrument. (Classical guitar required.)

1

Prerequisites

MUS 111- MUS 112 or permission of the instructor

MUS 212 Guitar Class IV

Is a continuation of Guitar Class III, emphasizing improved coordination of the fingers through appropriate exercises, improved sight reading skills, and an introduction to the different styles of music in different periods: Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Contemporary. (Classical guitar required.)

1

Prerequisites

MUS 111- MUS 112 or permission of the instructor

MUS 221 Introduction to Gregorian Chant

Gives students the opportunity to learn about the development of the oldest body of music in the world. In this course, students will learn how to read Gregorian chant notation and how to sing the most commonly used melodies for the Mass and the Divine Office. Students will also engage the teaching of the Church on sacred music in order to understand the place of Gregorian chant in the modern Church.

3

MUS 222 Gregorian Chant I

Will put the ear training received in Theory and Analysis I & II to practical use. In gaining a working knowledge of neumatic notation through the time-honored note-reading system developed by Guido of Arezzo, students will learn a number of Gregorian Ordinary and Proper settings, the psalm tones and the common hymns, canticles, responsories and antiphons of the Gregorian repertoire. Unlike Introduction to Gregorian Chant, this course will be a more aggressive engagement with Gregorian Chant and its context in the liturgy and the fruits of this course will augment the musical offerings of the Schola Cantorum on and off campus.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 109 and MUS 110

MUS 223 Gregorian Chant II

Will put the ear training received in Theory and Analysis I & II to practical use. In gaining a working knowledge of neumatic notation through the time-honored note-reading system developed by Guido of Arezzo, students will learn a number of Gregorian Ordinary and Proper settings, the psalm tones and the common hymns, canticles, responsories and antiphons of the Gregorian repertoire. Unlike Introduction to Gregorian Chant, this course will be a more aggressive engagement with Gregorian Chant and its context in the liturgy and the fruits of this course will augment the musical offerings of the Schola Cantorum on and off campus.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 109 and MUS 110

MUS 224 Music History Survey

Offers an overview of basic musical trends throughout history, focusing particularly on the development of Western music since the Renaissance. A more detailed exploration of Medieval music can be undertaken in the Survey of Sacred and Religious Music (MUS 260) and Introduction to Gregorian Chant (MUS 220). Sacred music majors are ineligible to take this course.

3

Prerequisites

MUS 109, MUS 110

MUS 261 Survey of Sacred and Religious Music

Is the central course of the Sacred Music Minor and is an overview of the history of sacred music, its context in the development of the liturgy and its role in the modern Church. The course is open to all University students; however, sacred music majors are ineligible to take this course.

3

MUS 270 Organ III

(Major Instrument) help organ majors to achieve a high level of competency in their instrument. Entrance into the major presupposes at least an intermediate level of keyboard proficiency. An organ major should be able to demonstrate a varied and professional level of ability upon graduation. In organ study, students will be required to perform representative pieces from the organ literature of the past five centuries and will be active accompanying the Schola Cantorum Franciscana at liturgies and occasionally leading congregational song. Seven semesters of instruction on the primary instrument, as well as three years of Schola Cantorum is required of all sacred music majors. In addition, the various skills required to play the organ in the liturgy will constitute a part of organ study. Attendance at weekly performance class is required of all organ majors, and will include the study of improvisation, figured bass, solo accompanying, congregational accompanying, performance practice, arranging, organ design and history, and organ literature.

3

MUS 271 Organ IV

(Major Instrument) help organ majors to achieve a high level of competency in their instrument. Entrance into the major presupposes at least an intermediate level of keyboard proficiency. An organ major should be able to demonstrate a varied and professional level of ability upon graduation. In organ study, students will be required to perform representative pieces from the organ literature of the past five centuries and will be active accompanying the Schola Cantorum Franciscana at liturgies and occasionally leading congregational song. Seven semesters of instruction on the primary instrument, as well as three years of Schola Cantorum is required of all sacred music majors. In addition, the various skills required to play the organ in the liturgy will constitute a part of organ study. Attendance at weekly performance class is required of all organ majors, and will include the study of improvisation, figured bass, solo accompanying, congregational accompanying, performance practice, arranging, organ design and history, and organ literature.

3

MUS 272 Voice III

(Major Instrument) For second-year students. Majors are expected to achieve a high level of ability in their area of study. Entrance into the program presupposes at least an intermediate level of ability, and voice majors should be able to demonstrate a professional level of ability upon graduation. Seven semesters of instruction on the major instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum are required of all sacred music majors. Attendance at weekly performance class is required. Additional diction classes will also be required of voice majors as part of their private study.

3

MUS 273 Voice IV

(Major Instrument) For second-year students. Majors are expected to achieve a high level of ability in their area of study. Entrance into the program presupposes at least an intermediate level of ability, and voice majors should be able to demonstrate a professional level of ability upon graduation. Seven semesters of instruction on the major instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum are required of all sacred music majors. Attendance at weekly performance class is required. Additional diction classes will also be required of voice majors as part of their private study.

3

MUS 303 Music History I

Explores the progression of musical practices, styles, genres, forms, and pieces in the history of Western Music. Due to the emphasis on Medieval and Renaissance music in other courses (particularly Gregorian Chant I and II and Schola Cantorum), this course will primarily focus on the music of the last five centuries.

3

Prerequisites

MUS 109, MUS 110, MUS 209, MUS 210

MUS 304 Music History II

Explores the progression of musical practices, styles, genres, forms, and pieces in the history of Western Music. Due to the emphasis on Medieval and Renaissance music in other courses (particularly Gregorian Chant I and II and Schola Cantorum), this course will primarily focus on the music of the last five centuries.

3

Prerequisites

MUS 109, MUS 110, MUS 209, MUS 210, MUS 303

MUS 313 Conducting I

Explore the fundamentals of choral and instrumental conducting, and score-reading techniques. The University ensembles, particularly the Schola Cantorum Franciscana and the Franciscan Chamber Orchestra, will provide the opportunity for conducting students to have hands-on experience directing ensembles in rehearsal and (occasionally) in performance.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 109. MUS 110. MUS 209, MUS 210. Non-organ majors also need MUS 174 or MUS 183.

MUS 314 Conducting II

Explore the fundamentals of choral and instrumental conducting, and score-reading techniques. The University ensembles, particularly the Schola Cantorum Franciscana and the Franciscan Chamber Orchestra, will provide the opportunity for conducting students to have hands-on experience directing ensembles in rehearsal and (occasionally) in performance.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 109. MUS 110. MUS 209, MUS 210. Non-organ majors also need MUS 174 or MUS 183.

MUS 370 Organ V

(Major Instrument) help Organ majors to achieve a high level of competency in their instrument. Entrance into the major presupposes at least an intermediate level of keyboard proficiency. An organ major should be able to demonstrate a varied and professional level of ability upon graduation. In organ study, students will be required to perform representative pieces from the organ literature of the past five centuries and will be active accompanying the Schola Cantorum Franciscana at liturgies and occasionally leading congregational song. Seven semesters of instruction on the primary instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum is required of all sacred music majors. In addition, the various skills required to play the organ in the liturgy will constitute a part of organ study. Attendance at weekly performance class is required of all organ majors, and will include the study of improvisation, figured bass, solo accompanying, congregational accompanying, performance practice, arranging, organ design and history, and organ literature.

3

MUS 371 Organ VI

(Major Instrument) help Organ majors to achieve a high level of competency in their instrument. Entrance into the major presupposes at least an intermediate level of keyboard proficiency. An organ major should be able to demonstrate a varied and professional level of ability upon graduation. In organ study, students will be required to perform representative pieces from the organ literature of the past five centuries and will be active accompanying the Schola Cantorum Franciscana at liturgies and occasionally leading congregational song. Seven semesters of instruction on the primary instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum is required of all sacred music majors. In addition, the various skills required to play the organ in the liturgy will constitute a part of organ study. Attendance at weekly performance class is required of all organ majors, and will include the study of improvisation, figured bass, solo accompanying, congregational accompanying, performance practice, arranging, organ design and history, and organ literature.

3

MUS 372 Voice V

(Major Instrument) For third-year students. Majors are expected to achieve a high level of ability in their area of study. Entrance into the program presupposes at least an intermediate level of ability and voice majors should be able to demonstrate a professional level of ability upon graduation. Seven semesters of instruction on the major instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum are required of all sacred music majors. Attendance at weekly performance class is required. Additional diction classes will also be required of voice majors as part of their private study.

3

MUS 373 Voice VI

(Major Instrument) For third-year students. Majors are expected to achieve a high level of ability in their area of study. Entrance into the program presupposes at least an intermediate level of ability and voice majors should be able to demonstrate a professional level of ability upon graduation. Seven semesters of instruction on the major instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum are required of all sacred music majors. Attendance at weekly performance class is required. Additional diction classes will also be required of voice majors as part of their private study.

3

MUS 405 Sacred Music Colloquium I

Constitute the central experience of the program in sacred music along with the Schola Cantorum Franciscana and private performance study. Team-taught by all of the music faculty and guest lecturers over the course of one year, Sacred Music Colloquium will offer practical instruction about how to plan liturgies and the manner of their execution. Attention will be given to the resources available for church musicians and magisterial teaching on the role of sacred music in the liturgy. Also, students will be exposed to the literature of choral, organ and congregational music as well as the traditions of Protestant churches and different styles of music for worship. This course will augment the practical experience gained in the Schola Cantorum while allowing the four experienced church musicians on staff to offer their instruction to the future generation of church musicians.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 109, MUS 110, MUS 209, MUS 210 and either MUS 174, MUS 176 or MUS 183 and completion of the jury or permission of the instructor.

MUS 406 Sacred Music Colloquium II

Constitute the central experience of the program in sacred music along with the Schola Cantorum Franciscana and private performance study. Team-taught by all of the music faculty and guest lecturers over the course of one year, Sacred Music Colloquium will offer practical instruction about how to plan liturgies and the manner of their execution. Attention will be given to the resources available for church musicians and magisterial teaching on the role of sacred music in the liturgy. Also, students will be exposed to the literature of choral, organ and congregational music as well as the traditions of Protestant churches and different styles of music for worship. This course will augment the practical experience gained in the Schola Cantorum while allowing the four experienced church musicians on staff to offer their instruction to the future generation of church musicians.

1

Prerequisites

MUS 109, MUS 110, MUS 209, MUS 210 and either MUS 174, MUS 176 or MUS 183 and completion of the jury or permission of the instructor.

MUS 470 Organ VII

(Major Instrument) help organ majors to achieve a high level of competency in their instrument. Entrance into the major presupposes at least an intermediate level of keyboard proficiency. An organ major should be able to demonstrate a varied and professional level of ability upon graduation. In organ study, students will be required to perform representative pieces from the organ literature of the past five centuries and will be active accompanying the Schola Cantorum Franciscana at liturgies and occasionally leading congregational song. Seven semesters of instruction on the primary instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum is required of all sacred music majors. In addition, the various skills required to play the organ in the liturgy will constitute a part of organ study. Attendance at weekly performance class is required of all organ majors and will include the study of improvisation, figured bass, solo accompanying, congregational accompanying, performance practice, arranging, organ design and history, and organ literature.

3

MUS 471 Organ VIII

(Major Instrument) help organ majors to achieve a high level of competency in their instrument. Entrance into the major presupposes at least an intermediate level of keyboard proficiency. An organ major should be able to demonstrate a varied and professional level of ability upon graduation. In organ study, students will be required to perform representative pieces from the organ literature of the past five centuries and will be active accompanying the Schola Cantorum Franciscana at liturgies and occasionally leading congregational song. Seven semesters of instruction on the primary instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum is required of all sacred music majors. In addition, the various skills required to play the organ in the liturgy will constitute a part of organ study. Attendance at weekly performance class is required of all organ majors and will include the study of improvisation, figured bass, solo accompanying, congregational accompanying, performance practice, arranging, organ design and history, and organ literature.

3

MUS 472 Voice VII

(Major Instrument) For fourth-year students. Majors are expected to achieve a high level of ability in their area of study. Entrance into the program presupposes at least an intermediate level of ability, and voice majors should be able to demonstrate a professional level of ability upon graduation. Seven semesters of instruction on the major instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum are required of all sacred music majors. Attendance at weekly performance class is required. Additional diction classes will also be required of voice majors as part of their private study.

3

MUS 473 Voice VIII

(Major Instrument) For students in their fourth year or beyond. Majors are expected to achieve a high level of ability in their area of study. Entrance into the program presupposes at least an intermediate level of ability, and voice majors should be able to demonstrate a professional level of ability upon graduation. Seven semesters of instruction on the major instrument as well as three years of Schola Cantorum are required of all sacred music majors. Attendance at weekly performance class is required. Additional diction classes will also be required of voice majors as part of their private study.

3

FRN Upper-level French courses

12

THE Theology electives (300-400 level)

12

MTH Upper-level mathematics electives (one of these electives can be replaced by a CSC elective)

12

ENG Literature courses

15

GRK/LAT 300-level Greek and Latin courses in which HEB 206 may be included

15

HST 200-400 level history courses

18

ECO 2 Economics electives from 300-400 level courses

ENG 2 upper-level English courses

THE Upper-level (200 or above) theology courses

3

ANT 3 upper-level Anthropology electives

Additional hours of other writing courses at the 300-400 level, including special topics courses in composition

6

HST Other history courses

6

American literature

6

Natural Science

6

6 credits of upper-level mathematics courses

POL Upper-level POL courses

6

COM 200-400 level COM courses

9

MTH 200-400 level mathematics courses

9

ECO 300-400 level economics courses

9

British literature

9

Writing courses

9

MTH Upper-level mathematics electives

9

ACC/BUS/ECO Elective

3

Additional science sequence* course(s)

4

Adolescent Psychology

American Founding Principles Core

3

ANT Anthropology Elective

3

BIO Biology Elective

3

BIO Biology Elective

4

BIO Molecular & Cellular Elective

4

BIO Organismal & Evolution Elective

4

BUS Business Elective

3

CAT Elective

3

Catholic Psychology Elective

3

Catholic Traditions in Fine Arts Core

3

COM Communication Arts Elective

3

CSC Elective

3

CSC/MTH Elective

1

CSC or EGR Course

3

Discipline Specific Course 1

Students pursuing biomedical engineering should take CHM 112 General Chemistry II.  Students pursuing civil, mechanical, or electrical engineering should take PHL 212 Foundation of Ethics.

3

Discipline Specific Course 2

Students pursuing biomedical engineering should take PHL 212 Foundations of Ethics.  Students pursuing civil, mechanical, or electrical engineering should take PHL 211 Metaphysics.

3

Discipline Specific Course 3

Students pursuing biomedical or mechanical engineering should take EGR 216 Rigid Body Dynamics.  Students pursuing civil or electrical engineering should take THE 115 Christian Moral Principles.

3

DRA 150

Economics Core

3

ECO Economics Elective

3

Eight electives

Elective

1-3

Elective

3

Electives

15

Electives

9

Elementary Foreign Language

3

Elementary Foreign Language OR Elective

3

Elementary/Intermediate Foreign Language

3

ENG English Elective (Literature)

3

ENG English Elective (Literature-A)*

3

ENG English Elective (Literature-B)*

3

ENG English Elective (Literature-C)*

3

ENG English Elective (Literature-D)*

3

ENG English Elective (Literature-E)*

3

ENG English Elective (Literature-F)*

3

ENG English Elective (Writing)§

3

Four social work electives

COM Four upper-level COM courses

CSC Four upper-level CSC courses

GRM German Major Elective

4

GRK 300 level elective

3

History Core

3

HST History Elective

3

History, Social Science OR American Founding Principles Core

3

HON Honors

3

Intermediate Foreign Language OR Elective

3

Intermediate Foreign Language Requirement

3

Intermediate Foreign Language Requirement

6

International Multidisciplinary Course

3

LAT/GRK 300 level elective

3

Literature Core

3

Literature OR Catholic Traditions in Fine Arts Core

3

MTH Math Elective

3

MTH Math Elective

4

Mathematics Core

3

Math/Macroeconomics Core

3

MTH/ECO Math or Economics Core

3

MTH/CSC Elective

3

MTH Elective-Upper Level

3

Natural or Applied Science elective

3

Natural Science Core

3

ACC/BUS/ECO One 300-400 level ACC, BUS, or ECO course level with finance topic

ACC One 300-400 level accounting course

OR

Or any higher level math

POL 436 or Special Topics in Political Science

Philosophy Core

3

PHL Philosophy Elective

1

PHL Philosophy Elective

3

Philosophy History Elective 3

3

POL Political Science Elective

3

PSY Psychology Elective

3

Quantitative Measures

3

Science Elective

3

Science sequence*, first course(s)

4

Science sequence*, second course(s)

4

Social Science Core

3

Social Science Elective

3

Social Science/History Core

3

SWK Social Work Elective

3

SOC Sociology Elective

3

 

SPN Spanish Major Elective

3

Subdiscipline specific course

3

THR Theatre Elective

3

THE Elective (above 200-400 level)

3

Theology Core

3

THE Theology Elective

3

Theology OR Philosophy Core

3

PHL Three courses from the 300 level and 400 level philosophy courses

COM Three upper-level COM courses

CSC Three upper-level CSC courses

BIO/CSC Two Elective courses in Biology or Computer Science

THE Two theology electives

BIO Two upper-level biology electives

COM Two upper-level COM courses

MTH/CSC Upper level MTH or CSC elective

WITH

NUR 201 Nursing From Concepts To Practice

Considers historical, cultural, professional, and futuristic points of view relative to the nursing profession. Course work includes the philosophical, theoretical, and conceptual aspects of nursing; the nursing process; and the role of the professional nurse in responding to health needs. 3 lecture hours per week (45 theory hours)

3

Prerequisites

Prerequisite to all other nursing courses.

Corequisites

This course may not be taken concurrently with other nursing courses.

NUR 203 Professional Role Transition

Explores selected professional issues that affect the ability of a nurse to deliver professional nursing care. The course examines the transition from the role of the registered nurse to that of a Bachelor prepared nurse via strategies for professional, personal, cultural, and spiritual growth and development. Emphasis is on nursing therapeutics, ethics, professionalism, research, critical thinking, and communication as the advanced practice nurse acts as leader and change agent in the process of promoting wellness for individuals and aggregates. (RN to BSN or RN to MSN students only) 45 theory hours

3

Prerequisites

Licensed registered Nurse, permission of instructor.

NUR 204 Foundations in Nursing Process and Nursing Practice

Presents the process and practice of professional nursing with emphasis on integrating essential knowledge from the physical and behavioral sciences with nursing procedures. Nursing theory and the nursing process provide the background for this rigorous course. 3 lecture hours per week, 45 theory hours, 60 clinical and 30 lab hours per semester. Clinical fee.

5

Prerequisites

Admission to Nursing Major, NUR 201, and sciences required in first three semesters.

Corequisites

Taken concurrently with NUR 206.

NUR 206 Health Assessments

Details the process and practice of professional nursing. The health assessment component emphasizes the importance of utilizing techniques of inspection, auscultation, percussion, and palpation as tools to providing holistic client-centered care. The mastery of health assessments provides the professional nurse with the database necessary for deriving nursing diagnoses-that which designates nursing's authentic locus-and to intervene and assist in actual or potential health problems, thereby assisting the client to achieve optimal levels of self-care. This health assessment will be presented by a systematic head-to-toe approach emphasizing integration as a whole. The use of nursing theory and the nursing process will be the conceptual framework for practice. 2 theory hours and 2 laboratory hours per week.

3

Prerequisites

Freshman and first-semester sophomore courses required in the Nursing Program or per- mission of instructor.

Corequisites

Taken concurrently with NUR 204.

NUR 303 Medical Surgical Nursing

Provides assessment, planning, caring for, and evaluation of adults with various acute and chronic health problems. Promoting wellness, health teaching of patients and their families, and studying health outcomes toward the goals of self-care are emphasized. 45 lecture hours, 39 lab hours, 96 clinical hours per semester. Clinical Fee.

6

Prerequisites

All freshman and sophomore courses required in the Nursing Program

NUR 304 Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing

Studies health assessment, planning intervention, and evaluation of adults with various acute and chronic psychiatric and mental health problems, which occur through the development process. This course includes concepts from interpersonal theory, family theory, collaborative practice, group theory, healing, and the study of health outcomes as a result of nursing intervention. 45 theory hours, 90 clinical hours, 45 lab hours per semester. Clinical fee.

6

Prerequisites

All freshman and sophomore course required in the Nursing Program

NUR 311 Family-Centered Maternity Nursing

Addresses family health care from conception throughout pregnancy to birth and the care of the newborn. Helping families in their educational and developmental experience as they prepare to welcome the new baby is stressed. Women's health care needs throughout the life span are also included. 45 lecture hours, 45 laboratory and 90 clinical hours per semester. Clinical fee.

6

Prerequisites

All freshman and sophomore courses required in the Nursing Program (including Child and Adolescent Psychology of Human Development I)

NUR 312 Family-Centered Nursing Care of the Child

Studies family concepts and nursing care of infants, preschoolers, children, and adolescents with acute and chronic health problems and illnesses that occur as children grow and develop in various cultural and economic environments. 45 lecture hours. 45 lab hours and 90 clinical hours over the term. Clinical Fee.

6

Prerequisites

All freshman and sophomore courses required in the Nursing Program. Must have successfully completed Child and Adolescent Psychology and Nutrition.

NUR 325 Mission Preparedness

is an elective course that presents topics at a beginning level for those students interested in taking part in foreign and domestic mission work. The course explores issues such as selected communicable and chronic diseases, mission-related pharmacology, cultural competencies, emergency care, disasters, and population, social, and health assessment.  

3 general elective credit hours

Prerequisites

Sophomore, junior, or senior student in any major

NUR 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in nursing. The availability of internships is limited to senior-level students, normally seniors with a 2.5 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives. Internships must be preapproved.

1-6

Prerequisites

Nursing Senior standing and permission of the department chair

NUR 401 Family-Centered Community Health Nursing

Presents concepts and practices in community health nursing with care of families and groups over the health-illness continuum. This course includes family and community health assessment, health teaching, and collaborative planning with other health professionals on the public health team. 3 lecture hours. 46 laboratory and 89 clinical hours per term. Clinical fee.

6

Prerequisites

All freshman, sophomore, and junior-level courses required in the Nursing Program or permission of instructor

NUR 402 Family-Centered Nursing Care of Clients with Complex Health Problems

Further refines students' knowledge in nursing assessment and intervention in the care of clients with complex and chronic health problems that require collaborative health planning. This course includes care of people with physiological problems and patterns as they influence the general state of a person's health. 45 lecture hours, 41 laboratory and 94 clinical hours per semester. Clinical Fee.

6

Prerequisites

All freshman, sophomore, and junior-level courses required in the Nursing Program

NUR 403 Leadership and Management Processes in the Practice of Nursing

Focuses on the principles of management and leadership within the health care delivery system. The emphasis on this course is to learn how to work with people as individuals and as members of groups, teams, and organizations. Concepts of a collaborative practice in new and emerging nursing roles are explained in theories of change, team-building, continuous quality assurance, and political, legal, and ethical issues in health care. 45 lecture hours, 120 clinical hours and 15 lab hours over the semester. Clinical fee.

6

Prerequisites

NUR 401, NUR 402 and all freshman, sophomore, and junior-level courses required in the Nursing Program or permission of the instructor

NUR 404 Research in Nursing

Introduces the research process as an important factor in improving evidence-based nursing practice, nursing education, nursing theories, and nursing administration. 3 lecture hours per week. 45 theory hours

3

Prerequisites

All freshman, sophomore, and junior-level nursing courses and NUR 401 or NUR 402 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

Must be taken concurrently with NUR 435.

NUR 435 Research Seminar

Is a coordinating seminar that critically analyzes nursing research. Concurrent with NUR 404 and its implications for practice. 15 theory hours over the semester.

1

Prerequisites

All freshman, sophomore, and junior-level nursing courses and NUR 401 or NUR 402 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

Must be taken concurrently with NUR 404.

NUR 438 Pharmacology

Is an elective nursing course that reviews the types of drugs most commonly administered by the registered nurse. The classification, action, adverse effects, routes of administration, usual dosages, and compatibility of drugs will be discussed. 2 lecture hours per week. 30 theory hours over the term.

2

Prerequisites

Junior/senior level standing in the Nursing Program. (or with permission of the instructor.)

PHL 113 Philosophy of the Human Person

Studies what it is to say that human beings are persons and have freedom and subjectivity; the different powers of the human person, including the powers of understanding, willing, feeling, and loving; the difference between body and soul in human beings, and the unity of the two; and the question of the immortality of the soul. Some classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read. This is a particularly fundamental course that underlies many of the other courses.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHL 503

PHL 211 Metaphysics

Begins by asking what metaphysical questions are. One then poses selected metaphysical questions, such as what becoming is, what time is, what goodness is, what it means for a thing to exist, what the transcendental properties of being are, and, as the supreme question of metaphysics, whether God exists. Some classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHL 511

PHL 212 Foundations of Ethics

Inquires into the significance of moral good and evil in the life of the human person; into moral virtue and vice (or moral character); into moral obligation; right and wrong actions; moral laws and the problem of exceptions; and the place of conscience in the moral life. One also studies the con- temporary debate between consequentialist and deontological ethics, and the claims of ethical relativism. Some classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHL 512

PHL 301 Logic

Is studied not just as an instrument or technique, but as a part of philosophy worthy of being studied in its own right. One inquires into the nature and kinds of concepts and of propositions; the truth and falsity of a proposition; the distinction between synthetic and analytic propositions; syllogistic and other kinds of formal argument; informal arguments; logical fallacies; and the attempt to mathematize logic. One also studies the differences among Aristotelian, Hegelian, empiricist, and other approaches to the issues of logic.

3

PHL 306 Epistemology

Inquires whether is it possible for the human mind to know anything as it really is, and studies the philosophers who have affirmed and those who have skeptically denied this possibility. One inquires into the place of knowledge in the existence of the human person, asking what it is about persons that enables them to know; one also inquires into the social and historical conditions of knowing. One proceeds to distinguish different kinds and degrees of knowledge, as well as different sources of error. Attention is given throughout to the role of the senses in knowing. Classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHL 526

PHL 308 Philosophy of Religion

Is to be distinguished from PHL 425 (Philosophy of God). The philosophy of religion is an area of philosophy that has only recently been recognized by philosophers. It deals with religious experience and with revelation; with basic religious acts such as faith or despair; with aspects of religious language; with the social dimension of religious existence; with religious perversions, such as idolatry; and with the religious needs and yearnings of the human person.

3

PHL 310 Selected Problems in Ethics

Studies not the foundational categories of ethics, such as virtue or obligation, but rather very concrete ethical problems, such as questions of sexual morality, abortion, surrogate motherhood, killing in self-defense, a just war, or the nature of our responsibility for the environment. The content of the course will vary from semester to semester, according to the issues chosen by the professor.

3

PHL 311 Ancient Greek Philosophy

Begins with the pre-Socratics and with Socrates and then studies, above all, the thought of Plato and of Aristotle. The main developments in the Hellenistic period, including Stoicism, Skepticism, and Epicureanism are also introduced.

3

PHL 312 Medieval Philosophy

Begins with Plotinus and Augustine and proceeds through Anselm, Bonaventura, Aquinas, and Scotus, to the thinkers of the late Middle Ages.

3

PHL 315 Renaissance and Early Modern Philosophy

Begins where PHL 312 leaves off and covers the period from the end of the Middle Ages up to Hume and Leibniz in the 18th century, excluding Kant. It includes Descartes, Pascal, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, and Wolff.

3

PHL 316 Kant and Later Modern Philosophy

Deals with the epoch-making philosophy of Kant (1724-1804) and the main philosophers and schools of philosophy in the 19th century, including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

3

PHL 325 The Thomistic Tradition in Philosophy

Studies primarily the philosophy of St. Thomas himself, whose life and times are reviewed, and who is studied through texts representative of his work. One also studies some of the main trends of subsequent Thomistic philosophy, including some of the leading contemporary Thomists such as Gilson, Maritain, Fabro, Lonergan, and Rahner.

3

PHL 332 Introduction to Eastern Philosophy

Surveys the major philosophical developments that took place in antiquity and during the medieval period in the Moslem world, in India, and in China. As Maritain noted, a sound philosophical education today requires some exposure to the contributions of the East. The student's grasp of Western philosophy will be strengthened through this course since philosophical development in India and in Greece have much in common.

3

PHL 340 The Franciscan Tradition in Philosophy

Starts with the life of St. Francis and the early Franciscan movement, and then studies, above all, the thought of St. Bonaventure, Blessed John Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham. Then attention is drawn to recent thinkers whose work has been influenced by, or resembles, the work of these three.

3

PHL 411 Aesthetics

Studies first the metaphysics of beauty, which involves issues such as beauty and being, beauty and good, and divine beauty. Then one studies beauty in the fine arts, in literature, and in nature. In addition, the place of beauty in the life of the human person is studied. The course even includes questions that do not directly concern beauty, such as the essence of the tragic and of the comic.

3

PHL 412 Contemporary Philosophy

Picks up where PHL 316 leaves off. It deals with the main philosophers and schools of philosophy in the 20th century, including phenomenology, existentialism, Thomism, analytic philosophy, and deconstructionism.

3

PHL 422 Philosophy of Community

Asks what it means to say with Aristotle that man is a social animal, and then studies how modern philosophies of intersubjectivity (Hegel, Scheler, Levinas, von Hildebrand) have contributed to our understanding of the relation of each person to others. One also inquires into the structure of communities such as the family, the state, and mankind, and also how the individual can participate in them in a manner appropriate to his personhood.

3

PHL 423 Philosophy in Literature

Studies the philosophical views expressed in works of literature such as The Divine Comedy, Camus' The Plague, and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, examine these views in terms both of their assumption and their philosophical implications. One studies the difference between philosophical statement of truths and the distinctively literary expression of them.

3

PHL 424 Philosophy of Science

Studies questions first raised by Aristotle in his Physics, such as questions regarding space, time, matter, and number. One is also introduced to the philosophical problems arising from contemporary science, such as from the theory of relativity or the theory of evolution. The philosophical assumptions of some of the sciences are explored. Questions of scientific method are raised.

3

PHL 425 Philosophy of God

Inquires whether the existence of God can be proved and studies some of the main attempts to prove it (including the cosmological, the teleological, the ontological, and the moral proofs). One studies the problem of speaking about God without anthropomorphism (that is, speaking in such a way as not to reduce God to finite being). One comes to grips with the main objections to traditional theism, such as those of Kant and Hume, and those of process theology, and with the attempt to disprove the existence of God on the basis of the evil in the world.

3

PHL 426 Philosophy of Law

Studies the different orders of law, especially the natural moral law and the positive law of the state, and their interrelations; this involves issues such as justice, authority, the is-ought" distinction, the common good, and state punishment. Aquinas' Treatise on Law is typically read, as are modern authors such as Hegel, Kelsen, and Reinach."

3

PHL 428 The Nature of Love

Allows one to study this special area of the philosophy of the human person, looking closely at the personal response of love and the interpersonal relationship constituted by love. One studies the role both of the will and of the emotions in the act of loving. The relations between love and happiness, love and unity, and love and morality are explored. Different types of love may be examined, such as eros, agape, love of friendship, and familial loves. Betrothed love and its expression in and through the body sexually are also discussed. Both classical (e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Scotus, Bernard of Clairvaux) and modern (e.g., Kierkegaard, Buber, Marcel, von Hildebrand, Pieper, Wojtyla) sources are utilized.

3

PHL 430 Philosophical Texts

Studies closely some classics of philosophy, such as Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Metaphysics, some part of the Summa Theologiae of St. Thomas, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, and Husserl's Logical Investigations. Sometimes the seminar may center around several related texts. The idea is to study the great works of philosophy in greater depth than is normally possible when they are dealt with in other courses.

3

PHL 432 Philosophy of Language

Inquires into what the meaning of a word is and into the kind of reality that meaning has. One studies the performative" functions of language, which philosophers have only recently noticed, and also the emotive and prescriptive force of language. One is introduced to recent philosophical studies of grammar and also to the question of function of language in religion. One inquiries into the place of language in the existence of persons, asking whether language is only an instrument of communication and action, or a realm in which the human person dwells."

3

PHL 434 Thesis

Requires one to write a major paper not only of research but also, and even primarily, of analysis and reflection. This project is carried out under the direction of a professor and in discussion with other students. Open to non-majors.

1

PHY 105 Survey of Physical Science

Relates the methods of the physical sciences to everyday experiences. Arts and science students will learn to appreciate these methods in addition to learning about the physical environment. Topics are taken from physics, chemistry, astronomy, and earth science.

3

PHY 108 Survey of Physical Science with Natural Science Laboratory

Acquaints students majoring in education with the content and methods of the physical sciences. Topics are taken from physics, chemistry, astronomy, and earth science with emphasis on the basic theories in each area. Algebra is used so the relationships can be quantified. The laboratory exercises include demonstrations and experiments-from both biological and physical sciences-which could be adapted for use at various grade levels. 2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week.

3

Prerequisites

Education majors or permission of instructor.

PHY 111 General Physics I

Is a lecture- and recitation-based intensive introduction to mechanics and kinematics, fluids, and waves. Emphasizes quantitative and conceptual understanding without the use of calculus.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 160

Corequisites

Science majors co-requisite: PHY 112 (not required but strongly encouraged for non-science majors).

PHY 112 General Physics I Lab

Includes experimental confirmation and reinforcement of some topics from PHY 111; includes computer use in data collection and analysis.

1

PHY 113 General Physics II

Is a lecture- and recitation-based intensive introduction to electricity and magnetism, heat, and optics. Emphasizes quantitative and conceptual understanding without the use of calculus.

3

Prerequisites

PHY 111

Corequisites

Science majors co-requisite: PHY 114 (not required but strongly encouraged for non-science majors).

PHY 114 General Physics II Lab

Includes experimental confirmation and reinforcement of some topics from PHY 113; includes computer use in data collection and analysis.

1

PHY 125 Everyday Physics with Laboratory

Is a one-semester course, including a laboratory component, covering the major theories of physics and its ability to give a quantitative explanation for the world around us. Algebra is used to define quantities, to state the physical laws, and to solve simple problems. Emphasis is on macroscopic explanations, not on quantum mechanics. The major topics are mechanics, thermodynamics, waves, and electromagnetism. Three lecture and one 3-hour laboratory periods per week.

4

PHY 220 University Physics I

Is a calculus-based introduction to Newtonian gravitation, sound, fluids, thermodynamics, heat transfer, electromagnetic waves, and op- tics. Comprises 3 lectures hours and 1 recitation hour per week.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 161

Corequisites

Science majors co-requisite (not required but strongly encouraged for non-science majors): PHY 221

PHY 221 University Physics I Lab

Includes experimental confirmation and reinforcement of some topics from PHY 220; includes error analysis, computer use in data collection and analysis, and formal laboratory notebook write-ups.

1

PHY 222 University Physics II

Is a calculus-based introduction to Newtonian gravitation, sound, fluids, thermodynamics, heat transfer, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Comprises 3 lectures hours and 1 recitation hour per week.

3

Prerequisites

PHY 220, MTH 162

Corequisites

Science majors co-requisite (not required but strongly encouraged for non-science majors): PHY 223

PHY 223 University Physics II Lab

Includes experimental confirmation and reinforcement of some topics from PHY 222; includes error analysis, computer use in data collection and analysis, and formal laboratory notebook write-ups.

1

PHY 224 University Physics III

Is a calculus-based introduction to electricity and magnetism including Maxwell's equations, circuits, and power. Comprises 3 lectures hours and 1 recitation hour per week.

3

Prerequisites

PHY 222, MTH 162

Corequisites

Science majors co-requisite (not required but strongly encouraged for non-science majors): PHY 225

PHY 225 University Physics III Lab

Includes experimental confirmation and reinforcement of some topics from PHY 224; includes error analysis, computer use in data collection and analysis, and formal laboratory notebook write-ups.

1

POL 101 Foundations of Politics and Government

Introduces students to the basic ideas in the study of politics (e.g., authority, sovereignty, and the state), the perennial questions of politics (e.g., What justifies the right of some men to rule over others?), the nature of the discipline of political science and the various approaches to it, and the major political ideologies. Students receive a basic grounding in the systematic study of politics based on solid philosophical principles, as well as an introduction to political philosophy, papal social teachings, methodologies for studying politics, and the way to carry out research and write papers in political science. Also, selected current political issues may be evaluated in light of the principles studied. Required of all political science majors.

3

POL 220 American National Government

Surveys the institutions of the U.S. national government-the Congress, presidency, federal courts, and the federal bureaucracy-federalism, elections and voting, interest groups, the provisions of the U.S. Constitution and the principles embodied in it, and the historical, philosophical, and political background of our national institutions. Some current public policy questions may also be considered. Required of all political science majors.

3

POL 233 International Politics

Examines, with copious examples from history, the various principles and practices characteristic of the relations among nations. Particular emphasis is given to the centrality of the struggle for power among nations and the importance of diplomacy. Also considered are the following: the morality of warfare and other international actions; the nature of communism; arms limitation and disarmament; the morality of warfare; the problem of terrorism; papal encyclicals on international questions; and geopolitics. International law and organizations may also be touched on, and current international issues are considered. Required of all political science majors.

3

POL 291 Political Philosophy I

Political Philosophy I, and its companion course, Political Philosophy II, provide a basic foundation in and study the history of political philosophy, which is essential for the study of the rest of the discipline of political science. It briefly examines the philosophical foundations for political authority and studies the writings of the greatest political thinkers of the classical and medieval periods, such as Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, St. Augustine of Hippo, and St. Thomas Aquinas.

3

Prerequisites

It is recommended that POL 101 be taken before this course, but is not a prerequisite. Required of all political science majors.

POL 292 Political Philosophy II

Continues the study of the history of political philosophy started in POL 291. It studies the writings of the major political thinkers of the modern and contemporary periods, such as Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, J.S. Mill, Marx, Nietzsche, Dewey, and Rawls.

3

Prerequisites

It is recommended that POL 101 and POL 291 be taken before it, but these are not prerequisites. Required of all political science majors.

POL 301 Natural Law

Studies the notion of natural law and its relationship to human law and the political order. It examines the natural law tradition from its classical expressions to the great Catholic tradition of natural law to its substantial influence on the Anglo-American common law to its role in influencing the American Revolution and the American constitutional tradition. The contrast between the classical/Christian tradition of natural law and its modern expression is discussed. The course also considers how modern legal thinking has diverged from the natural law tradition, and how the clash between natural law and positivistic conceptions of law and morality is vividly seen in many current public issues and legal questions.

3

Prerequisites

While not a prerequisite, it is recommended that students take POL 101 before enrolling in this course.

Cross Listed Courses

LST 301

POL 308 Catholic Political Thought

Concentrates on key works, in whole or in part, of the major Catholic political thinkers and commentators. St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas will be considered, but they will be treated primarily in the Political Philosophy I course. Among the other writers and works that may be studied are selected papal encyclicals-especially those of Pope Leo XIII-Bellarmine, More, Suarez, Tocqueville, Brownson, Santayana, Acton, Maritain, Gierke, Rommen, Messner, Murray, McCoy, Costanzo, and Schall.

3

POL 320 Comparative Politics

Studies the government and politics of selected foreign countries. Similarities and differences among foreign governments and between foreign governments and the US government are stressed, along with the political philosophies underlying the other countries' institutions. Certain general topical areas, such as comparative law, are sometimes treated in addition to individual countries. Required of all political science majors.

3

POL 327 United States Presidency

Studies the powers and responsibilities of the U.S. president. It also considers the shaping of the presidency in the Constitution by our Founding Fathers, the development of the office by the various men who have occupied it, presidential nomination and election, the expansion of the presidential role in American government, and the constitutional limitations on the president. Some special attention may also be given to the current presidential administration.

3

POL 335 United States Foreign Policy

Examines the history of American foreign policy, the influence of our political past and the underlying principles of our political order in shaping our foreign policy, the manner in which our foreign policy is formulated and implemented by the legislative and executive branches, the connection between our foreign and defense policies, and the nature of current and recent American foreign policy. Special attention will be given to the moral considerations that have influenced U.S. foreign policy.

3

Cross Listed Courses

HST 335

POL 336 American Political Thought

Studies key writings of America's greatest political thinkers and the most noteworthy commentators on the American political order. Among the thinkers who may be studied are the Founding Fathers, Alexis de Tocqueville, John C. Calhoun, Abraham Lincoln, Orestes Brownson, John Courtney Murray, Irving Babbitt, Leo Strauss, Eric Voegelin, Russell Kirk, Gerhart Niemeyer, and the Southern Agrarians. Attention may also be given to the nature of American liberalism and conservatism.  Cross-listed with HST 336.

3

Cross Listed Courses

HST 336

POL 337 International Law and Organizations

Surveys the current state of international law and its philosophical and historical background. Catholic principles on the law of nations are also considered. The main international organizations and alliances, such as the United Nations and its arms (including NGOs), the European Union, the Organization of American States, and NATO are also examined.

3

POL 342 Public Administration and Bureaucratic Politics

Considers such topics as the principles and practices of effective management and administration; the structure and expansion of the executive branch of the U.S. government; the nature of bureaucratic activity in American governmental institutions; agency-public employee relations; budgeting and fiscal administration; agency rule-making and enforcement powers; administrative law and other legal and constitutional restraints on agencies; proposals for bureaucratic reform; the bureaucratic response to selected public issues; the implications for public administration of American Founding principles and political developments in American history; and the evolution of American ideas about public administration.

3

POL 343 Politics, Economics, and the Social Encyclicals

Focuses on the interrelationship of politics, ethics, and economic activity. The major papal social encyclicals are studied in depth and are the chief basis for considering the subject. Philosophical principles relating to economic life are examined. The works of important economic-ethical thinkers such as Pesch, Fanfani, Roepke, Chesterton, Belloc, and Schumacher are also considered. Basic economic principles, institutions, and practices, especially as they relate to politics, and different economic systems are also discussed. Some attention may be given to the history and nature of the governmental role in the U.S. economy.

3

POL 347 Metropolitan Politics

Studies politics and government in leading American cities and metropolitan areas. Among the topics considered are: the growth and development of urban and suburban America; urban political machines and reform movements; the political relations and conflicts between city and suburb; political trends in recent years in major cities and metropolitan areas; urban and suburban political parties; recent demographic, economic, and social changes in metropolitan areas; the nature of urban problems and the governmental response to them; and the role of private institutions in urban and metropolitan development.

3

POL 358 American Constitutional Law

Surveys U.S. constitutional law from the earliest years of the Republic to the present. The major U.S. Supreme Court decisions in our history in the areas of the powers of government, federalism, and individual rights, and the philosophical and historical background of American constitutional law are considered. The operation and intended role of the U.S. Supreme Court are also examined. Required of all political science majors.

3

POL 361 American State and Local Government

Explains and analyzes the structure and functioning of government on the state and local level. Forms and operation of municipal and county government, problems confronting state and local governments, state constitutions, lawmaking, and administration are considered. The role of political parties and interest groups in state and local government is also examined. Required of all political science majors.

3

POL 365 The American Judiciary

Examines key aspects of the operations and powers of federal and state courts. The political impact of judicial decisions and the possible political role of the judiciary in the U.S. are also considered.

3

POL 368 Congress and Legislative Politics

Studies the many facets of the U.S. Congress and the activities of its members. Included among the topics treated are the views of the Founding Fathers about the institution and its place in the scheme of republican government, its historical development, the powers of Congress, the relationship of Congress with the other branches of the national government, congressional rules and procedures, congressional elections and constituency relations, the activity of congressional committees, congressional leaders, political parties and Congress, interest groups and Congress, congressional staff, and the activity of passing legislation. Some attention may also be given to comparisons between Congress and American state legislatures.

3

POL 370 Global Terrorism

Studies this major current threatening phenomenon in the international domain. Among the topics considered are: the definition of terrorism, its history and causes, the different types of threats posed by terrorists, how terrorists exploit the media for their purposes, responses to terrorism and the ways of insuring homeland security, and the need for international cooperation to adequately counter terrorism. Students will study significant terrorist episodes in recent decades and consider and evaluate the effectiveness and the strengths and weaknesses of different policy alternatives and strategies to deal with terrorism.

3

POL 380 Selected Themes in Constitutional Law

Focuses, in-depth, on specific subjects or topics in American or comparative constitutional law. Possible topics are First Amendment rights, the courts and religion, and constitutional law and the family. This course may be repeated for credit if the selected topic is different from when previously taken.

3

Prerequisites

While not a prerequisite, it is recommended that students take POL 358 before enrolling in this course.

POL 393 Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Mediating Structures

Studies the major types of non-governmental organizations in political life today. It examines the historical development, structure, power, and changing political and societal roles of political parties and interest groups. It also considers the efforts at reforming political parties and limiting the influence of interest groups in the U.S. in recent decades. It also examines the political perspectives and platforms of the major parties in American history, especially in light of Catholic social teaching. Parties at different levels are considered: local, state, national and congressional. While the focus is on parties and interest groups in the U.S., comparative study with those of other countries may also be included. The general importance of mediating structures e.g., (churches, the family, and voluntary associations such as political parties and interest groups) for a democratic republic and a good political order generally-according to Catholic social teaching, social ethics, and the tradition of political philosophy-is also discussed.

3

POL 435 Coordinating Seminar

Requires in-depth reading and research on a selected topic in political science, culminating in a research paper or project with an original component. Students will also present their research orally to the seminar group. There may also be class discussion on the state of the discipline of political science and related topics. Required of all Political Science majors.

1

Prerequisites

Open only to Political Science majors with senior standing who have completed at least seven of the following required courses: POL 101, POL 220, POL 233, POL 291, POL 292, POL 320, POL 358, POL 361 and all of the following courses that are also required for the major: ENG 103- ENG 104 (except for Honors Program students), HST 207- HST 208, PHL 113, PHL 211, PHL 212.

PSY 105 General Psychology

Presents a picture of the science of psychology as it exists today. Factors that are characteristics of individuals in general are studied. These topics include the nervous system, emotions, perception, sensation, thinking, motivation, and personality development.

3

Prerequisites

Prerequisite for all psychology courses.

PSY 204 Psychological Statistics

Is based on the principle that a scientific study of man and his behavior requires the measurement and description of his behavior in an objective, systematic manner. This course introduces the student to the fundamental statistical techniques used in psychological research. These methods include sampling techniques, measures of central tendency, variability, correlation, and probability.

3

Prerequisites

MTH 155 and PSY 105

PSY 206 Psychology of Human Development I

Examines the physical, cognitive, social, and personality development of the child from conception through adolescence. Human development involves the study and critical review of the child development and the developmental theories of early and middle childhood, as well as those of adolescence and young adulthood. Knowledge of physiological, sociological, and psychological forces as they influence the behavior of the child and maturing adolescent are vital to the understanding of the human personality. This course also examines some of the problems involved in these phases of the development sequence.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 207 Psychology of Human Development II

Is a continuation of the study of human personality focusing on the psychological, physiological, and sociological forces as they influence maturity and decline in behavior during early, middle, and late adulthood.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 208 Adjustment

Recognizes the fresh insight of contemporary psychology into human behavior, such as new approaches for helping individuals overcome their problems and fulfill their personal potential. Through small group discussion and interpersonal encounter, students learn to cope with such problem areas and to discover personal potentials.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 209 Adolescent Psychology

Examines the physical, cognitive, social, moral, religious, and personality development of the maturing adolescent. Knowledge of physiological, sociological, and psychological forces, as they influence the behavior of the adolescent, is vital to the understanding of the human personality. Some of the problems involved in this phase of the developmental sequence are also explored.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 224 Social Psychology

Explores the growth of a social personality, the effects of crowd behavior, the development of values and attitudes, and the mechanics of group life in general. The recognized scholars Maslow, Goffman, Berger, Luckman, and others, are included in this study of the whole person.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

Cross Listed Courses

SOC 224

PSY 275 Cognitive Psychology

Is the understanding of the mental processes that one undergoes to understand the world, one another, and to make a decision. This course will examine the cognitive means that accompany processes of memory, attention, categorization, logic, problem solving, reasoning, decision making, and speech development.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 301 Educational Psychology

Emphasizes the psychological approach to learning, methods of evaluation, transfer of learning, training, developmental patterns of pupils, and teacher-student interaction, along with focus on language development. Although when compared to some other sciences, educational psychology is relatively young, the problems this course deals with are very old. Solutions to some of these problems are offered through the ideas of James, Thorndike, Watson, Skinner, Goddard, Bayler, Bruner, Piaget, Erikson, White, Marcia, Elkind, Gardner, Chomsky and others. Students will be given opportunities to engage in small group discussions as well as experiential exercises designed to bring to life the ideas of several of the educational theorists.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 304 Multivariate Statistics

Is designed to introduce students to the fundamental principles of multivariate statistical analysis. Possible topics to be covered include multivariate data screening, analysis of covariance, MANOVA, discriminant analysis, cluster analysis, multi- dimensional scaling, factor analysis, profile analysis, path analysis, structural equation modeling, hierarchical linear modeling, and meta analysis.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 204

PSY 305 Industrial Organizational Psychology

Surveys the important and widespread applications of psychology to industry and business, involving many different areas of general psychology. Some of these applications have been in the following areas: motivational research, evaluation and interviewing of employees, factors in adjustment, and efficiency in work such as employee morale, training, job evaluation, and fatigue.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 307 Experimental Psychology I

Provides an introduction to research practice and experimentation. Class lectures, demonstrations, laboratory experiments and survey research enable the student to learn and apply the scientific method in psychological research. 3 credit hours per semester.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 204

PSY 308 Experimental Psychology II

Builds on the foundation provided in PSY 307 by putting into practice what was learned in the introductory course and taking it to another level.   It involves more independent research and in-depth data analysis.  In addition there are opportunities for poster preparation and the writing of papers that could be submitted for journal publication. 3 credits per semester.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 307

PSY 309 Personality

Investigates one of the most complex phenomena studied by psychology. It is so because in our daily lives we continually meet and deal with other personalities, anticipate their actions, and understand their feelings. Personality theories that underlie the various approaches to psychotherapy are studied in this course. Among the theories examined are: psychoanalysis, behaviorism, cognitive-behaviorism, social learning, phenomenology, and existentialism.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 310 Motivation and Emotion

Builds upon the long history of interest in human motivation-why people behave in certain ways. This history can be traced from the early speculation of philosophers to the scientific research of contemporary psychologists. In this course, the student will survey the major philosophical points of view concerning motivation and will study intensively the work of psychologists interested in motivation. The student will also study emotion in this course. Emotions are linked closely to motivation because they influence the way people perceive and adapt to the world. Psychologists believe that emotions determine the quality of motivated behavior.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 318 Perception

Is studied in an attempt to explain man's observations of the world around him. Each man lives in his own world, for his world is determined by what and how he experiences it. By studying the sensory processes, the organization of visual and auditory experiences, and perceptual anomalies such as illusions, students gain a better understanding of "why things look as they do" to the perceiver.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 319 Introduction to Counseling

Assists students in developing counseling skills through an analysis of contemporary models of counseling designed for behavior change or adjustment. Theories and rationale behind these counseling models will be presented with actual counseling case materials.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 320 Group Dynamics

Discusses general principles of interaction in human relation situations. Through demonstration and participation, students learn to work effectively with groups and to achieve deeper self-understanding by employing the various group techniques used in personal, social, and emotional adjustment.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 319

PSY 322 Advanced Counseling

Deals in further depth with many of the issues presented in the introductory counseling course. Emphasis will be placed on actual experience in counseling through extensive use of role-playing situations and actual counseling cases. Close supervision will give the opportunity for interaction with the instructor in the development of the student's counseling skills.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 319 or permission by instructor

PSY 324 Human and Spiritual Integration

Is a seminar in contemporary psychology and Christian Humanism emphasizing the intimate and dynamic correlation of nature and grace. An interdisciplinary approach is designed to critically examine contemporary issues and areas of concern. Psychological perspectives on being human such as development, personality, motivation, value, psychopathology, addiction, and therapeutic interventions will be brought into dialogue with theological perspectives on human beings such as finitude, human nature, conversion, holiness, growth, vocation, and spirituality. The primary focus will be on developing skills for practical understanding and application.

3

Prerequisites

Completion of at least two courses in psychology and two courses in theology

Cross Listed Courses

THE 324

PSY 350 Family, Gender, and Spiritual Issues in Counseling

Is designed to aid students in an understanding of issues related to family, gender, and spirituality. These three separate, yet integrated areas will be explored in the context of the counseling relationship. Topics may include an awareness of issues faced in marriages and by families, therapeutic interventions dealing with the issues and problems marriages and families face, issues of gender equality and differences as they influence marriage and family, healthy and unhealthy approaches to religion and how both affect therapeutic intervention, and a presentation of models of psychological intervention, specific treatment issues, and techniques from multiple theoretical orientations that can be utilized when working with religiously-committed clients.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 351 Spirituality in the Helping Professions

Allows students to examine their faith and enhance recognition of how it influences their lives and others that they will serve through their professions. It will help students to understand and provide guidelines for how to use Catholic Social Teaching in their work with clients. It will also enhance awareness of other faith traditions and religions.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105 or SWK 203

Cross Listed Courses

SWK 351

PSY 401 Abnormal Psychology

Deals with the most fascinating of topics-the disorganized personality. It explores a wide variety of unusual human experiences ranging from minor maladjustments encountered in daily living to more severe disorders requiring hospitalization or prolonged treatment. Students gain an understanding of mental and emotional dysfunctions as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual 5, as well as etiologies, and treatment. Should be taken as a junior/senior course.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 403 Psychological Tests

Makes a principal distinction between modern scientific psychology and philosophical psychology through its emphasis on quantitative measurement as a means of acquiring knowledge about human behavior as contrasted to the speculative approach. To describe human abilities, psychologists have developed measures of intelligence, achievement, aptitudes, interest, and personality. This course examines these types of evaluation instruments and gives the student the opportunity to administer and interpret such tests. Should be taken as a junior/senior course.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 204

PSY 406 Biopsychology

Provides an introduction to the relationship of brain and hormones to psychological functioning. It will examine basic neuroanatomy and neurophysiology important to behavior, and present the biological bases of motor movement, sleep, emotions, perception, memory, language, motivation and psychopathology.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 133, BIO 134 & PSY 105

PSY 407 Internship

Is required for completion of the major.  It aids students in improving their professional skills through a directed, extensive 150-hour experience in a psychological, psychiatric, mental health, or human services setting. Psychology majors may serve their internship as undergraduate research assistant. 3 credit hours per semester.

3

Prerequisites

Senior status

PSY 408 Internship

Is an optional second experience for students in order that they are exposed to further opportunities for skill development in clinical or research settings.  It requires 150 hours in the chosen facility. 3 credit hours per semester.

3

Prerequisites

Senior status

PSY 409 Interviewing and Assessment

Studies the purpose, structure, and techniques of effective interviewing, history taking, and recording client data. Selected types of assessment techniques are also presented.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105

PSY 434 Thesis

Requires senior majors to write a thesis on an approved psychological topic. The thesis will primarily involve library research. Guidance and supervision will be provided by a departmental faculty member.

1

Notes

Senior majors must choose either PSY 434 Thesis or PSY 435 Coordinating Seminar to complete their major course requirements for graduation.

Prerequisites

Senior status

PSY 435 Coordinating Seminar

Is a formal presentation of an extensively researched and approved topic of psychological interest.

1

Notes

Senior majors must choose either PSY 434 Thesis or PSY 435 Coordinating Seminar to complete their major course requirements for graduation.

Prerequisites

Senior Status

SCI 302 Science Practicum

Provides a holistic, interdisciplinary understanding of science using a variety of instructional strategies, curriculum materials, and computer-based tools in analyzing data. The course emphasizes the professional and legal obligations of science teaching, uses current research findings on early adolescent learning, and establishes collegial discourse for all students to learn to implement lessons in science based upon Ohio's Model Competency-Based Science Program Goals. Candidates will experience teaching labs hosted by an instructional team approach, i.e., professors from the Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Physical Science, and Education Departments.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 106 and PHY 108

SOC 101 Introductory Sociology

Is a scientific study of human behavior involving two or more individuals. It is intended as a general survey of the discipline of sociology, analyzing various institutions that may affect human behavior. Some of the institutions that sociologists study are the family, religions, media, peer groups, and political systems.

3

Prerequisites

This course is the prerequisite for all advanced courses in sociology and social work.

SOC 106 Christianity and Society

Examines the relationship between religion and human behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to a current sociological perspective for dealing with contemporary social problems and concerns. In addition, students will learn the value of taking a sociological perspective for understanding the various statements and efforts of Christian groups and individuals to address social issues. Students will be encouraged to view social problems from both sociological and Christian perspectives, thereby coming to a deeper appreciation and understanding of the complexity of our lives and our social world.

3

SOC 107 Communes and Covenants

Exposes the student to various groups and movements in the United States. Each is described and analyzed in a sociological framework. The groups range from Gypsies, Shakers, Amish, and Oneida, to the Bruderhof Communes of the 70s and the charismatic covenant communities. A search is made for their underlying causes and their probable consequences for both the individual and the larger community.

3

SOC 204 Marriage and Family

Is a popular course because many students realize that this is a serious vocation and, as a consequence, they wish to learn more mature ways of dealing with it. The general student will appreciate the insights that sociologists have provided-certain ways of looking at husband-wife relations and parent-children relations. Sociology majors will, in addition, acquaint themselves with a special aspect of the general theories of institutions. An attempt at blending these two approaches is made by the instructor and students.

3

SOC 205 Criminology and Penology

Deals with the philosophy and history of society's ideas about crime and what should be done about it. Sociology has uncovered many facets through the use of concepts developed in general sociology as well as in the field of criminology itself. Based on this new knowledge, a number of new theories and new policies are advocated.

3

SOC 211 Social Theory

Provides the framework for sociological research. The classical sociologists such as Comte, Spencer, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim will be presented followed by discussions of the modern sociological theories such as functionalism, conflict theory, social exchange, and symbolic interactionism. These theories will be re-evaluated in light of a Christian perspective.

3

SOC 224 Social Psychology

Explores the growth of a social personality, the effects of crowd behavior, the development of values and attitudes, and the mechanics of group life in general. The recognized scholars-Maslow, Goffman, Berger, Luckman, and others-are included in this study of the whole person.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PSY 224

SOC 314 Deviant Behavior

Is the sociology of deviance provides an exploration of the sociological concepts of deviance, social order, social power, identity construction, and identity management. Students will understand how the sociological perspective of deviance differs from the psychological and social work approach to understanding society and social life, although there is an overlap of knowledge within these perspectives. Students will begin to recognize how groups of people can gain power to shape social definitions of deviance, and apply these definitions across multiple situations and even societies.

3

SOC 324 Sociology of Religion

Covers a wide variety of topics including religious social ethics, history of religious movements, church and sect organizations, religion in American society, religion and identity, and the religious aspects of the sociology of knowledge.

3

SOC 409 Domestic Violence

Examines the violence that exists in many families today. Sociologists and social psychological theories will be presented as possible explanations and solutions to domestic problems. The course will focus on spousal physical and emotional abuse, marital rape, incest, and child abuse.

3

SOC 410 Juvenile Delinquency

Analyzes juvenile behavior that is beyond parental control and subject to legal action. This course will focus on the social circumstances that promote such behavior, particularly in family situations and peer groups. In addition, the effectiveness and ineffectiveness of the juvenile justice system will be analyzed.

3

SOC 422 Philosophy of the Social Sciences

Investigates the basis of knowledge in the social sciences through a study of recent debates. The course deals with problems of theory construction, verification, and the role of models in sociology as well as aspects of the use of the social sciences in the formation of public policy.

3

SOC 434 Senior Thesis

Is required of all senior majors. Students will meet with their advisor to discuss their senior thesis, which will be an original library research project.

1

SPN 101 Elementary Spanish I

Is the first half of a two-semester course sequence that studies the first principles of grammar, drills on pronunciation and vocabulary, oral and written exercises, and drills in the language laboratory.

3

SPN 102 Elementary Spanish II

is the second half of a two-semester course sequence that studies the first principles of grammar, drills on pronunciation and vocabulary, oral and written exercises, and drills in the language laboratory.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 101 or the equivalent.

SPN 106 Intensive Elementary Spanish

Is an intensive study of the first principles of grammar and implements intensive practice with drills on pronunciation and vocabulary, oral and written exercises, and drills in the language laboratory.

6

SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I

Is the first half of a two-semester course sequence that reviews and continues the study of grammar, conversation, prose composition, and selected reading. Language lab work is also included.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 102 or SPN 106 or the equivalent.

SPN 202 Intermediate Spanish II

Is the second half of a two-semester course sequence that reviews and continues the study of grammar, conversation, prose composition, and selected reading. Language lab work is also included.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 201 or the equivalent.

SPN 206 Intensive Intermediate Spanish

Reviews and continues the intensive study of grammar, conversation, prose, composition, and selected reading. Language lab work is also included.

6

Prerequisites

SPN 102 or SPN 106 or equivalent.

SPN 303 Advanced Composition and Conversation I

Is the first of two courses that concentrate on the fine points of grammar, further practice in idioms, conversation, and prose composition. Conducted in Spanish.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent.

SPN 304 Advanced Composition and Conversation II

Is the second of two courses that concentrate on the fine points of grammar, further practice in idioms, conversation, and prose composition. Conducted in Spanish.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent.

SPN 307 Conversation I

Is the first of two courses using authentic films and readings that stimulate meaningful communication, emphasize critical thinking, and draw on students' interdisciplinary knowledge in order to communicate fluidly in Spanish. It will help prepare students to take the Oral Proficiency Exam (OPI), a required element for Ohio Teacher licensure. 

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or the equivalent is required. It is recommended that students take this course as soon as possible after SPN 202/SPN 206 or the equivalent.

SPN 308 Conversation II

Is the second of two courses using authentic films and readings that stimulate meaningful communication, emphasize critical thinking, and draw on students' interdisciplinary knowledge in or to communicate fluidly in Spanish. It will help prepare students to take the Oral Proficiency Exam (OPI), a required element for Ohio Teacher licensure. 

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or the equivalent is required. It is recommended that students take this course as soon as possible after SPN 202/ SPN 206 or the equivalent.

SPN 325 Spanish Culture and Civilization

Is a survey of elements, such as history, art, music, and traditions that have contributed to Spanish peninsular culture. Lectures, readings, discussions, and reports are included.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 326 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization

Focuses on the geography, history, art and sciences, customs, and traditions of Hispanic countries in the New World. Lectures, readings, discussions, and reports are included.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202, SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 327 EL Camino de Santiago

Examines one of the world's most celebrated pilgrimage routes, the Way of St. James. The course will cover not only the artistic and religious dimensions of the Camino, but also the long-term impact the Camino has had on the history, economy, and culture of Spain. The Camino will also be studied in terms of its significance in European culture. In Spanish; written reports and oral participation required.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202/ SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303/SPN 304 are strongly recommended.

SPN 329 Topics in Hispanic Culture

Is a flexible course, the contents of which will vary form one semester to another. Study will focus on cultural issues of particular periods and regions of Spanish-speaking societies. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different from when previously taken.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 331 Survey of Peninsular Literature I

Examines Peninsular Spanish literature from its beginnings in the Middle Ages to the end of the Renaissance and Baroque periods.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 332 Survey of Peninsular Literature II

Examines Peninsular Spanish literature from the Enlightenment to the present.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 363 Masterpieces of Spanish American Literature I

Is an introduction to the literature of the region known today as Latin America. This course will concentrate on early literary expressions in this region that date from the 15th century to the 18th century. Readings include surviving pre-Hispanic works of literature, the first documents written by Europeans about the New World, the first writings by mestizos" with particular attention to Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, and writings pertaining to the struggle for independence. Conducted in Spanish. Written and oral reports."

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 364 Masterpieces of Spanish American Literature II

Critically examines some of the most significant works of Latin American literature of the 19th and 20th centuries with particular attention to the authors of the Latin American Boom, which include Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, and Mario Vargas Llosa. Conducted in Spanish. Written and oral reports and research work required.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 381 Liturgy and Literature: Spanish Hymns in the Liturgy of the Hours

Studies the official hymns (i.e. religious poems set to music) incorporated into the Breviary from different periods after the Liturgical Reformation as approved by Pope Paul VI in the Apostolic Constitution Laudis Canticum of 1970. The course will examine the historical, artistic, cultural, and religious aspects of the hymns. The course organization will follow the topical division of the liturgical calendar of the Liturgy of the Hours. In Spanish; written reports and oral participation required.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202/ SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 are strongly recommended.

SPN 389 Topics in Hispanic Literature

Is a flexible course, the contents of which will vary from one semester to another. Study may focus on a literary period, author, genre, movement, or region of Spanish or Latin American literature. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different from when previously taken.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 391 History of the Spanish Language

Examines the origins of the Spanish language and its development through history to the present day. Course material will begin with the roots of Spanish in Indo-European and Latin. The evolution of the language will be seen in lexical acquisitions and grammatical transformations brought about by contact with other languages such as Arabic, Germanic, French, English, and Native American languages. In Spanish; written and oral reports required.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202/ SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303/ SPN 304 are strongly recommended.

SPN 392 Spanish Pronunciation: Phonetics and Phonology

Studies the sound system of modern Spanish in its articulatory, acoustic, and organizational aspects. Students will learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA); regional variations of Spanish will be examined. In Spanish; written and oral reports required.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202/ SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 399 Topics in Spanish Linguistics

Is a flexible course, the contents of which will vary from one semester to another. Study will focus on particular areas of Spanish linguistics, such as phonetics and phonology, morphology, dialectology, history of the Spanish language, sociolinguistics, etc. This course may be repeated for credit if the topic is different from when previously taken.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 400 Internship

Is a work-experience opportunity with the purpose of expanding education by applying accumulated knowledge in Spanish. The availability of internships is limited to upper-level students, normally juniors and seniors with a 2.5 quality point average. Students are approved individually by the academic department. A contract can be obtained from the Career Services Office in Starvaggi Hall. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

Spanish junior or senior standing and permission of the department chair. Internships must be preapproved.

SPN 406 The Golden Age

Uses lectures and selected readings from the Spanish literature of the 16th and 17th centuries to highlight a study of authors and styles from Garcilaso to Calderón. Conducted in Spanish.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 426 Cervantes I: Don Quixote

Is a study of one of the most important and influential books of all time, and what is considered to be Spain's greatest literary contribution to Western civilization. This course includes lectures, class discussions, research, written and/or oral reports.

3

Prerequisites

No prerequisite is necessary if offered in English; cannot be used to satisfy the language requirement. If offered in Spanish, SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 427 Cervantes II: The Shorter Works

Delves into the author's poetry, theater, and shorter prose works. This course includes lectures, class discussions, research, written and/or oral reports.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 430 Romanticism

Is a detailed study of the Romantic movement as seen in selected works of the period. Extensive reading and analysis of Romantic-era works promote a double objective of gaining an understanding of the Spanish version of the worldwide movement as well as an appreciation of the unique styles of the Spanish romanticists.

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 433 Modernism

Considers the Spanish literary and cultural manifestations of the Modernist epoch with emphasis on the reading and interpretation of representative works in several genres. As such, it will focus mainly on the writers of the Generation of '98.""

3

Prerequisites

SPN 202 or SPN 206 or equivalent is required; SPN 303 and/or SPN 304 taken previously is strongly recommended.

SPN 434 Senior Thesis

Requires that a dissertation be written under the guidance of an instructor. The subject is chosen in consultation with the head of the department and may deal with an aspect of the language, literature, or civilization of Spain or Spanish-America.

1

Prerequisites

Permission.

SPN 435 Coordinating Seminar

Emphasizes selected readings, research, reports, and discussions of specific authors, genres, or trends in Spanish or Spanish-American literature. A recommended course for students planning to enter graduate school.

1

Prerequisites

Permission.

SWK 203 Introduction to Social Work

Introduces the student to the profession of social work, its history, philosophy, values and ethics, and fields of practice. The course also explains the relationship between social work and social welfare. Special focus is given to cultural and human diversity and at-risk populations that social workers serve and why social workers promote social and economic justice. The course also addresses the ethical code of conduct for social workers and its implications for social work practice. This course is required for social work majors and some education majors.

3

SWK 205 The History of Social Welfare

Focuses on the political, social, and economic forces that influenced the historical evolution of social welfare policy, with particular emphasis on the United States. The course examines the treatment of poor and oppressed populations, and other historically vulnerable persons, as well as the historical development of the social work profession.  The influence of changing societal values will also be explored.

3

SWK 210 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

Analyzes the growth and development of the individual in the environment from birth through old age. Emphasis is placed on knowledge of the biological, psychological, cultural, spiritual and social forces, which influence human development. Application of course content is made in reference to social work practice.

3

Prerequisites

BIO 133 & BIO 134, SOC 101, PSY 105, SWK 203

SWK 307 Generalist Practice I

Is the first of the three required practice courses. The course prepares students for generalist social work practice with individuals, families, groups, communities, various diverse populations, and organizations. The course introduces the planned change process and focuses on communication, relationship, and assessment skills and goal planning necessary for generalist practice.

3

Prerequisites

This course is restricted to social work majors. SWK 203, SWK 205, SWK 210

SWK 308 Generalist Practice II

As a continuation of Generalist Practice I focuses on generalist practice with families and groups. Students will examine various types of families and groups and obtain the skills and knowledge needed to practice at the mezzo level of intervention. Special attention is given to practice involving diverse populations and those at risk of poverty and discrimination.

3

Prerequisites

This course is restricted to social work majors. SWK 203, SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307

SWK 309 Issues of Culture and Diversity

Students will understand how diversity and difference shape human experience.  They will examine racism, discrimination and oppression and identify the structural and institutional factors that may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.  Students will also understand strategies to eliminate oppressive structural barriers in order to promote human rights and social justice.

3

SWK 313 Social Work Research

Introduces students to basic research skills and knowledge, preparing them for lifelong learning and informed professional practice. Students will be introduced to the tools needed to understand, appreciate, evaluate, and apply the body of knowledge relevant to practice in social work and the social sciences. The practice of critical thinking will enable students to develop their abilities to evaluate research studies, apply findings to practice, and evaluate practice outcomes. Students will develop basic skills in problem formulation, methodology, design, data collection and analysis, understanding descriptive statistics, and drawing and evaluating conclusions. The course will also review ethical principles and practice related to social work research as defined by the NASW Code of Ethics.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 204, SWK 203, SWK 205

SWK 315 Human Rights, Social Justice, and Social Policy

Students will link social policy with social work practice and understand the process of policy formulation and implementation.  They will achieve skills in policy analysis and understand how to apply their understanding of social, economic, and environmental justice to advocate for human rights.

3

SWK 316 Social Work with the Elderly

Focuses on social work intervention skills and knowledge for practice with the aging and elderly population. Students will examine and understand the developmental challenges associated with the aging process. Students will also understand the emotional, psychological, financial, spiritual, and social factors associated with aging and ethical issues associated with intervention with the aged.

3

SWK 317 Social Work in Behavioral and Physical Health Care Settings

Will prepare students for professional social work employment in health care and behavioral health settings, including hospitals, inpatient and outpatient mental health settings, home health care, and nursing homes. Students will understand the emotional, psychological, social, spiritual, and economic factors associated with mental and physical illness and health care. Students will learn skills needed for interventions with clients in health care settings.

3

SWK 318 Working with Children and Adolescents

Introduces the student to the unique considerations for intervention with children and adolescents. The course focuses on the practical application of material as well as the influence of social policy on practice and intervention. Debates, discussions, and videos are utilized to examine relevant, temporal issues and supplement lecture material as well as to provide opportunities for critical analysis.

3

SWK 319 Social Work & Addictions

will examine the various substance use disorders as presented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual.  This course is designed for entry-level professionals who will be working with individuals, families, groups, and communities where substance disorders are present.  This course will provide necessary information to help students understand the causes of addiction and factors associated with addictive behavior.  It will also teach students to effectively engage, assess, and serve those who are affected by substance disorders and their families, in addition to aiding communities dealing with the problem.

3

SWK 321 Social Work and Corrections

will prepare students for professional practice in correctional settings.  Students will examine theories that explain criminal thinking and criminal behavior, and examine legal incompetence.  They will learn skills to effectively engage, assess, and intervene with adult and juvenile offenders as well as the mentally incompetent as well as how to evaluate their work.  Legal, policy and ethical issues will be explored.

3

SWK 331 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II

Analyzes human functioning from a social systems theoretical perspective including an analysis of functioning at the family, group, organizational, and community level. Course content will also include the contribution of culture, ethnicity, racial composition, gender, populations diverse in age, sexual orientation, spirituality, and disabilities on human functioning.

3

Prerequisites

SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307

SWK 351 Spirituality in the Helping Professions

Allows students to examine their faith and enhances awareness regarding how it influences their lives and others that they will serve as professionals. It will help students to understand and provide guidelines for how to use Catholic Social Teaching in their work with clients. It will also enhance awareness of other faith traditions and religions.

3

Prerequisites

PSY 105 or SWK 203

Cross Listed Courses

PSY 351

SWK 409 Generalist Practice III

Focuses on generalist practice with and in larger social systems such as organizations and communities. The goal of social and economic justice is sustained and attention is given to social system change with and on behalf of populations at risk of poverty and discrimination. This course uses student experiences in field placement to enhance understanding. This course is restricted to social work majors.

3

Prerequisites

SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307, SWK 308, SWK 313, SWK 315, SWK 331

SWK 410 Field Practicum I

Complements the student's academic work and allows the student to integrate this knowledge through applied social work services in community settings including child and family services, health care, corrections, school systems, shelters, and mental health settings. Under the supervision of a social work field supervisor and departmental social work faculty, the student implements the generalist perspective within applied settings integrating theory, research, and social work professional values and ethics. The student is required to attend a weekly seminar and complete a minimum of 200 hours of fieldwork.

6

Prerequisites

SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307, SWK 308, SWK 313, SWK 315, SWK 331

Corequisites

The course is taken concurrently with SWK 409 Generalist Practice III and enrollment is restricted to social work majors.

SWK 411 Field Practicum II

Is a continuation of Field Practicum I. Students are engaged in generalist practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. The student's learning is guided by an agency-based social work supervisor and educationally directed and monitored by a department social work faculty member. A minimum of 200 hours is required in fieldwork. A weekly seminar facilitates integration of theory with field practice.

6

Prerequisites

SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307, SWK 308, SWK 313, SWK 315, SWK 331, SWK 409, SWK 410

SWK 413 Death, Dying, and Bereavement

Focuses on the human experiences of loss and death. Skills are presented for personal coping and for professional work assisting others in dealing with loss. Various topics covered include death and children, death and the elderly, ethical issues of death and dying, caregiving of the dying, and spiritual, financial, economic, and legal issues associated with death and dying.

3

SWK 437 Senior Social Work Capstone

Gives students the opportunity to review and critically analyze their professional social work education, including the liberal arts base. Assignments are utilized to assess how each student achieved program objectives. Oral presentations, group assignments and mock interviews are utilized to prepare students for professional practice and graduate school. This course is restricted to social work majors.

3

Prerequisites

SWK 205, SWK 210, SWK 307, SWK 308, SWK 313, SWK 315, SWK 331, SWK 409, SWK 410

THE 101 Foundations of Catholicism

Introduces the student to the teaching of the Catholic Church as it is rooted in Scripture and Tradition and faithfully proclaimed by the Church's magisterium (teaching office). Besides an introduction to Catholic doctrine, the course will also include some discussion of Church history, prayer and liturgy, the moral life, and Catholic life and theology. This course is required for all upper division (200 and above) theology courses except THE 341 Christian Marriage.

3

THE 102 Introduction to Scripture

Is especially designed for non-majors as a general overview of both the Old and New Testaments. Students will gain an acquaintance with the major block of biblical material, the key issues in biblical study today, major biblical themes, and an appreciation for the place of the Scriptures in the life of the Church and of the individual Christian. This course does not qualify as an upper division theology elective for the Theology Major.

3

THE 110 The Word of God: Scripture and Tradition

This course studies God's self-revelation throughout salvation history as it has been received and handed on by the believing community in the forms of sacred Scripture and sacred Tradition. Based on the Catholic doctrine of revelation and its reception as expressed in Dei Verbum, the course examines the central teachings of the Catholic Faith [such as creation, fall, and redemption, Trinity and incarnation, the Church and the Holy Spirit] as these have been expressed in the Scriptures and developed throughout the history of the Church's tradition. Emphasis is placed on reading primary sources, including major Biblical texts, writings of Church Doctors and Fathers, major theologians, magisterial documents and writings from the Franciscan tradition. This course is required for all upper division (200 and above) theology courses except THE 341 Christian Marriage.

3

THE 115 Christian Moral Principles

Elucidates the principles of morality that regulate Christian living. These principles are studied as they are found rooted in the New Testament documents and articulated throughout the history of the Christian community's lived existence, with a thorough look at the contemporary understanding of Christian moral theology as it is articulated by the magisterium of the Catholic Church and by theologians in union with the magisterium. Students will examine these principles as they apply to some perennial moral issues.

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 515

THE 206 Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II

Poetry is the second semester of the two-semester sequences in Intermediate Biblical Hebrew. This course focuses largely on the Psalms and a few instances of embedded poems in the biblical Hebrew narrative. The particular challenges of translating Hebrew poetry will be addressed. Vocabulary will be developed to include all words occurring 10 or more times in the Old Testament/Hebrew bible. An exegetical paper will be required. This course fulfills an upper-level elective requirement for the Theology Major.

3

Notes

Can be taken as last course in foreign language requirement sequence (HEB 206) or as a theology elective (THE 206). This course cannot satisfy both requirements.

Prerequisites

THE 101, THE 110 and HEB 205.

Cross Listed Courses

HEB 206

THE 211 Principles of Biblical Study I

Is an introduction to the literature of the Old Testament: the Tetrateuch, the Deuteronomic corpus, the prophetic literature, the priestly writings, the wisdom literature, and the Deuterocanonical books. Students will be directed to read selections from the above categories. The theological-historical meaning of the Old Testament will be stressed.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

THE 511

THE 212 Principles of Biblical Study II

Is an introduction to the literature of the New Testament: the Synoptic Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, the Johannine literature, the Pauline literature, the Letter to the Hebrews, and the "catholic epistles." The theological-historical meaning of the New Testament will be stressed.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

THE 512

THE 213 Theology of Christ

Investigates the person and mission of Jesus Christ as articulated in the New Testament documents, in the early creedal formulae, and in the declarations of the Church Councils of the fourth, fifth and sixth centuries AD. Finally, students will be exposed to positions of great Catholic thinkers and contemporary scholars on various Christological questions.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Corequisites

THE 513

THE 214 Theology of the Church

Examines the nature, history, and problems of the Christian community as understood in the Catholic tradition. Students undertake the task of investigating the biblical foundation of the Church, various branches of the Church, Christian authority, principles underlying church worship practices, church-state relationship, ecumenism, and other ecclesiological topics.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Corequisites

THE 514

THE 300 Franciscans in History

is an account of the Franciscan movement from the birth of St. Francis until modern times. The course traces the internal development of the three orders of St. Francis and the ways in which they influenced and were influenced by society. The course enables students to see the Spirit of God at work in the manifold development of Franciscan communities through the ages, and there will be a special emphasis on the contribution of the Third Order Regular.  Cross-listed with HST 300; Prerequisites: THE 101, 110

3

Prerequisites

THE 101, THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

HST 300

THE 301 St. Francis: Life and Charism

introduces the life of St. Francis through select writings of his Medieval biographers and examines his life within the social, political, and religious context of his time. The course explores his unique vision of life and the development of the Franciscan movement and the spirituality of the first, second and third order traditions up to the death of St. Bonaventure. Special consideration will be given to the Rule of the Third Order, the charism that inspired it, and the spirituality that it fosters.  Cross-listed with HST 301.  Prerequisites: THE 101 and 110

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

HST 301

THE 302 Early Christian Life and Thought

Studies the emergence of Christianity as a movement within Palestinian Judaism, its gradual growth amidst persecution in the Roman Empire, its conquest of the Roman world under Constantine and the Christian emperors, and its extension into Europe and beyond up to AD 600. Important themes to be discussed include the concepts of Christianity as a movement and its evolving relationship to the state; the development of Catholic doctrine through conflicts, creeds, and councils; the formation of the canon of Scripture; and Christian worship and the beginnings of sacramental practice. Students will also encounter through written texts the great figures who formed (or opposed) the early Christian Church.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 305 Mariology

Examines Church teaching on the Blessed Virgin Mary in regard to her role as Mother of the God-man, Jesus Christ; Mother of his Body, the Church; and Spiritual Mother to every person seeking the path to Jesus Christ. The course will include a theological investigation into: (a) defined Marian doctrine, (b) contemporary Marian documents by the magisterium, (c) examples of contemporary Mariological contributions, (d) principal forms of Marian piety, and (e) the Marian message to the modern world through the domain of private revelation.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 306 Theology of Healing

Seeks to explore the meaning of healing by integrating a variety of frameworks and perspectives. Wisdom traditions within Scripture and an existential phenomenological philosophy of the human person will provide a broad backdrop against which we will examine biopsychosocial aspects of human being and healing. Topics may include: the dynamics of personality; person and community; healing and relationships; healing and growth; healing of memories, mind and heart; healing and families; healing and spirituality, including prayer for healing; and healing groups, communities, and nations.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 307 Franciscans in the New World

Is a study of the influence of the Franciscans in the Americas from the arrival of the first friar in 1493 until the present. The course will examine the missionary efforts of the Spanish Franciscans in New Spain and Florida, of the French Recollect Franciscans and Capuchins in Quebec and New France, and of the early Franciscans in English-speaking America. It will also discuss the establishment of new Franciscan provinces in America with the explosion of Catholic immigration in the 19th century, and the founding of parishes, schools, colleges, seminaries, universities, and hospitals. The changes in religious life and activities since the Second Vatican Council will be explored.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

HST 307

THE 309 History and Spirituality of the Franciscan Third Order

(lay and religious) relates a treatment of the Franciscan Third Order's central charism-the penitential life-to the broader penitential movement in the Church. The course includes contemporary developments and applications, such as the Third Order Rules.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

HST 309

THE 310 Comparative Religion

Introduces students to the basic elements of man's religious experience as found in the major non-Christian communities of the world. Students will investigate the founders, scriptures, history, principles, and particular religious experiences of Eastern and Western religions. Finally, non-Christian religions will be examined in relationship to the Christian religion.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 313 Selected Topics in Franciscan Philosophy

Will focus on the thought of Bonaventure, Scotus, Ockham, or other authors of the Franciscan School.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 314 The Sacraments

Presents a general theological consideration of the structure of the sacramental life of the Church and an historic-dogmatic analysis of the major theologies of the individual sacraments. Particular emphasis will be given to baptism and Eucharist. The course will include the Christian response to the sacramental life in filial, salvific social, communal, and ecclesial dimensions.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

THE 516

THE 315 The Thought of BL. John Duns Scotus

examines important themes and fundamental concepts in the broad-ranging thoughts of Bl. John Duns Scotus. This course includes significant study of primary texts as well as readings in ongoing scholarship concerning the Subtle Doctor in both theology and philosophy. The course will focus on Scotus' distinctive metaphysical and logical contributions (such as the disjunctive transcendentals, the univocity of the concept of being, and the formal distinction) as well as his distinctive understanding of natural theology, natural law, and philosophical anthropology.  Cross-listed with THE 315.  Prerequisites: THE 101 and 110. 

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

HST 315

THE 316 Selected Topics in the Franciscan Tradition

will focus on certain historical, philosophical, or theological aspects of the Franciscan tradition determined by the professor.  Depending on the topic, this course may be cross-listed with HST 316.  Prerequisites:  THE 101 and 110

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

Depending on the topic, this course may be cross-listed with HST 316.

THE 320 Catholic Social Teaching

Is a broad study of general Church teaching on social questions with strong emphasis on the papal encyclicals and other Church documents. Major issues explored are poverty and the distribution of wealth, prejudice and racism, war and peace, criminal justice, the Gospel and the State, and international community and business ethics.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 324 Human and Spiritual Integration

Is a seminar in contemporary psychology and Christian Humanism emphasizing the intimate and dynamic correlation of nature and grace. An interdisciplinary approach is designed to critically examine contemporary issues and areas of concern. Psychological perspectives on being human such as development, personality, motivation, value, psychopathology, addiction, and therapeutic interventions will be brought into dialogue with theological perspectives on human being such as finitude, human nature, conversion, holiness, growth, vocation, and spirituality. The primary focus will be on developing skills for practical understanding and application.

3

Prerequisites

Completion of two courses in psychology and two courses in theology. THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

PSY 324

THE 325 Mariology II

Will focus, first, on the principal biblical texts upon which dogmatic and doctrinal Mariology is based, with a combination of patristic and medieval exegesis along with the best of contemporary exegetical approaches. An overview of the principal Marian fathers, doctors, and ecclesial writers will be offered as well as a deeper penetration into the thought of modern and contemporary contributors, in particular St. Louis Marie de Montfort, St. John Eudes and St. Maximilian Kolbe. A specific treatment of the controversial history of the Immaculate Conception as well as the doctrinal development of Marian Coredemption will be highlighted in this section. An extended treatment of the unprecedented Franciscan heritage in Mariology will be accentuated, with special emphasis on the Mariology of St. Francis, St. Bonaventure and Bl. John Duns Scotus, leading up to its contemporary manifestation in the pneumatology of St. Maximilian. An extended study of the rich Mariology of the Second Vatican Council will also be highlighted, with particular emphasis on the conciliar call for a more greatly developed concept of maternal mediation, as well as the implementation of the Council's call as manifest in the Mariology of John Paul II.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101, THE 110, THE 305

THE 326 The Franciscan Intellectual Tradition

introduces students to the intellectual patrimony of the followers of St. Francis. The course will give special attention to St. Bonaventure and Bl. John Duns Scotus, but may also consider other great Franciscan masters, such as Anthony of Padua, Peter Olivi, William of Ockham, and Lawrence of Brindisi. The course will also give attention to uniquely Franciscan themes, such as the primacy of charity in the Christian life, the absolute predestination of Jesus and Mary, the Christocentric pattern of creation, the role of the Immaculate Conception in the economy of redemption, and the nature of God's action in the Sacraments. Students will see how the Franciscan Intellectual Tradition represents a rich and dynamic guide to deeper understanding of humanity's place in the world and its relationship with God.  Cross-listed with HST 326.  Prerequisites:  THE 101 and THE 110

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

HST 326

THE 328 The Role of Women in the Franciscan Tradition

This course will look at those women who were influential in the founding and growth of the Franciscan tradition. The students will look at women involved in the direct founding of congregations of women who follow both the Rule of St. Clare as well as those women who founded and continue to found active Third Order Regular congregations whose mission and apostolates were fundamental in Catholic health care and education in the 19th and 20th Centuries. In addition, the course will look at women involved in the intellectual development of Franciscan life and thought.  Cross-listed with HST 328.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

HST 328

THE 332 The Thought of St. Bonaventure

Provides a treatment of Bonaventure's distinct philosophical and theological approach to questions on knowledge about God, creation, the Trinity, the Incarnation and Redemption, and Christian spirituality as uniquely centered in Christ crucified.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 333 The Trinity

Is an historical-theological study of God's unfolding revelation of his inner life and nature through the Old Testament, New Testament, the early Church councils, and in the thought of key theologians and Church teaching up to the present day. The implications of this revelation for life and prayer of the Christian community will also be explored.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 341 Christian Marriage

Examines the dimensions of a Christian marriage from a biblical, historical, doctrinal-liturgical, and pastoral viewpoint. Students will be directed to investigate the best available books on the areas listed above, with special emphases upon a Catholic understanding of human sexuality, the major problems involved in premarital and marital love-relationships, and the doctrinal-liturgical expressions of this same relationship. The content and the direction of this course will be dictated by the Catholic, sacramental understanding of marriage.

3

THE 345 Questions in Contemporary Theology

Addresses selected contemporary questions that demand a mature response from the informed Christian. This course emphasizes guided thought into specific dogmatic, moral, and spiritual issues.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 350 Christian Anthropology

Is a study of the Christian vision of the human person, the key issues in developing an understanding of the human person, and the development of an integral vision of the human person in the full richness of a person's ecclesial, sacramental, physical, and transcendental dimensions.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 355 Spiritual Theology in the Mission/Values of St. Francis and St. Clare

Examines key theological concepts of the Gospel way of life according to the writings of both St. Francis and St. Clare. Contemporary implications of Franciscan values are studied in light of the Church's mission.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Corequisites

THE 356

THE 356 Practicum: Mission/Values of St. Francis and St. Clare

Will integrate reflective theological study of St. Francis and St. Clare and mission experience of service with the poor in the local area. The directed field experience of 30 hours is complemented by 10 classroom hours of reflection and interpretation of this experience. (This course may be offered in certain semesters for 1 or 2 credit hours with adjustments in hours of field experience and reflection e.g., 20 hours of field experience and 8 hours of classroom contact for 2 credits; 10 hours of field experience and 5 hours of classroom contact for 1 credit.)

1-3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Corequisites

THE 355

THE 395 Theology of the Body

Seeks to examine and understand questions regarding the theological significance of embodiment as developed throughout Catholic Tradition. Historical in structure, the course focuses on the development of teachings and practices regarding the body in early, medieval, and modern Catholicism, with particular emphasis on the theology of the body developed by St. Pope John Paul II during a series of 129 Wednesday audiences spanning the years 1979-1984. Practices such as asceticism, sexual renunciation, marriage and procreation, suffering, and dying are examined in light of the Church's central doctrines regarding creation and the fall, redemption and incarnation, and death and the resurrection of the body.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 400 Internship

Is available to senior theology majors with a 3.0 QPA. Students may propose to the department chair an internship for 1 to 6 credits, depending on the type of internship and time spent. Arrangements for the internship must be made by the student and approved in advance by the Career Services Office and by the Theology Department chair. The internship must entail an application of theology in a pastoral project or setting. A sponsoring organization and on-going direct supervision of the student's work through- out the internship are required. Internships count as general electives.

1-6

Prerequisites

Theology senior standing. Internships must be preapproved.

THE 402 Christian Life and Thought in Modern Times

Presents an overview of the history of Christianity in modern times beginning with the Protestant Reformers and proceeding to the present day. It will primarily focus upon the doctrines and belief systems of the Protestant, Catholic, and Eastern Christian churches as they emerged and developed during this period. The contributions of modern Christianity's great saints, thinkers, and leaders will be highlighted. Attention will also be given to the relationship of these churches to each other (from polemics to ecumenism), to the broader society, and to movements of spiritual renewal and spirituality within modern Christianity.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 408 Women in Early and Medieval Christianity

Is an introduction to the study of women in early and medieval Christianity through a reading of primary source materials. Issues examined include women's religious choices, dominant view of the nature and roles of women, women's claims to religious authority, ideals of holiness, and women's spirituality and ascetic practices.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101, THE 110

THE 409 Christian Spirituality

Is designed to open the student to the themes of holiness in Scripture and to point out the different Fathers of the Church and other spiritual masters and the uniqueness in their spirituality. The course will also investigate some modern authors in the spiritual life and provide the principles of growth in holiness, their applications to historical and cultural situations, and their implications concerning life in the modern world.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 410 Great Catholic Thinkers

Focuses on a particular person or group of per- sons who have significantly contributed to our Catholic heritage. The topic chosen for a semester's study may be a particular person such as St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, or Cardinal Newman or it may be a group of thinkers such as third century apologists. This course may be taken more than once if topics are different.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 413 Old Testament Topics

Provides in-depth coverage to a specific Old Testament topic. The topic chosen for a particular semester's study may be a specialized theme such as Old Testament eschatology, a particular corpus of Old Testament writings such as the Pentateuch, or a specific book such as Jeremiah. This course may be taken more than once if topics are different.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101, THE 110 and THE 211

THE 414 New Testament Topics

Provides in-depth coverage to a specific New Testament topic. The topic chosen for a particular semester's study may be a specialized theme such as the Resurrection, a particular corpus of New Testament writings such as the Letters of Paul, or a specific book such as the Gospel according to John. This course may be taken more than once if topics are different.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101, THE 110 and THE 212

THE 418 Liturgy

Is an in-depth treatment of the historical and theological aspects of Christian worship: the concept of worship; the nature of liturgy; theocentric, Christocentric, and ecclesial dimensions of the liturgy; and consideration of various liturgical reforms in light of the theological and historical evaluation of the liturgy.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 420 Theology of the Angels

Provides an examination of the rich Catholic theological and philosophical tradition of the reality, nature, purpose, hierarchical structure, and mission of the angels. Philosophical and biblical foundations of angelology will be examined, along with patristic, medieval, modern, and contemporary commentaries and development in the study of the angels. Papal and magisterial teachings concerning angelology will likewise be examined.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 429 Sexual and Medical Morality

Investigates two major moral areas: (1) sexual morality-biblical and historical survey, general theological and psychological principles, basic moral foundations, masculinity and femininity, masturbation, homosexuality, pre-marital sexuality, sexuality in marriage, and elements of celibacy; and (2) medical morality-right to life, surgery and transplants, pre-marital laboratory experiments, healing, and death. Major issues such as abortion, euthanasia, and genetic medicine are treated in-depth.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

THE 434 Senior Thesis

The student's major advisor will suggest to the student either The 434 or The 435 in view of his or her career objectives. Those students choosing a thesis will write a 20 to 25 page research paper on a topic in theology, or a 35-40 page combined thesis for theology and a second major. Each thesis student will find a director in the Theology Department to direct and grade the thesis (or the theological aspects of the combined thesis).

1

Notes

All theology majors are required to take either THE 434 (Thesis) or THE 435 (Seminar) in their senior year.

THE 435 Coordinating Seminar

The student's major advisor will suggest to the student to either The 434 or The 435 in view of his or her program and career objectives. It will be the task of the members of the seminar to explore topics or discuss readings chosen by the faculty member directing the seminar. Normally, the seniors in the seminar will take turns leading the seminar discussion and will be graded on their leadership and their participation.

1

Notes

All theology majors are required to take either THE 434 (Thesis) or THE 435 (Seminar) in their senior year.

THR 100 Introduction to Theatre

Introduces the student to a wide range of theatrical information, including the basic elements and terminology of theatre in such areas as acting, directing, and technical theatre. Dramas of representative playwrights from major periods of Western theatre are read in conjunction with the study of the theatre of the time.

3

THR 111 Theatre History I

Introduces students to the major periods of theatre history, from Antiquity to Renaissance. The students will explore the culture and social conditions that gave birth to the theatre of each of these major periods, and they will study significant plays, artists, productions, and production practices of these cultures. The students will also be introduced to theatre history source material and research practices.

3

THR 112 Theatre History II

Introduces students to the major developments of theatre history, from the English Restoration to the present day. The students will explore the cultures and social conditions that gave birth to the theatre of these periods, and they will study significant plays, artists, productions, and production practices of these cultures. The students will also be introduced to theatre history source material and research practices.

3

THR 120 Stagecraft

Is an introduction to the materials and tools used in the technical areas of the theatre including set building, painting, lighting, sound, costuming, makeup, stage management, house management, and publicity. Laboratory hours in which the student will work on the University productions are required.

3

Corequisites

Must be taken in conjunction with THR 220 (1 credit).

THR 210 Fundamentals of Acting I

Introduces the beginning student to the problems, theories, and techniques of acting, focusing on improvisation and scene study.

3

THR 220 Theatre Practicum

Allows students to participate in technical support or performance roles for University-sponsored dramatic productions and other theatre related projects. Drama majors are required to participate in at least two University productions during the completion of the degree, earning a maximum of 6 credit hours. Individual responsibilities and intended learning experiences are to be arranged by the instructor and the student. This course is evaluated on a pass/fail system.

1-3

THR 310 Fundamentals of Acting II

Provides a detailed examination of the craft of acting focusing on scene study and performance. Beginning work on characterization is also stressed.

3

THR 315 Performing Shakespeare

Instructs students to develop an approach to addressing the challenges particular to acting texts by William Shakespeare. Through reading, writing, rehearsing, performing, and participating in classroom exercises, students learn ways to analyze and perform Shakespeare's sonnets and plays.

3

Prerequisites

THR 210 or permission of instructor

THR 320 Oral Interpretation

Is an introduction to the analysis and performance of literature. Students critically analyze various genres of literature and then share the results of that analysis through the act of performance. Vocal and physical techniques of performance, as well as approaches to literary criticism, are taught and developed.

3

THR 321 Advanced Interpretation

Is a study of the programming and performance of literature by groups. Students will study the conventions of Readers Theatre and Chamber Theatre and develop their own group performance through the scripting, staging, and performance of various genres of literature.

3

Prerequisites

THR 320

THR 330 Design for the Theatre

Is an introduction to scenic, lighting, costume, prop, and sound design for the theatre.

3

Prerequisites

THR 120 or permission of instructor

THR 335 Advanced Topics in Technical Theatre

Allows students to gain more experience in select areas of technical theatre. The primary focus will be on practical implementation of techniques, theories, and methods to complete various exercises. Each semester, half of the course will be devoted to lighting and lighting effects. The second half of the course will be determined based on the needs of the current production and the interest of current students. Possible topics will include stage makeup, mask making, scenic painting, modeling, props construction, and costume construction.

3

THR 340 Principles of Directing

Introduces the student to the directing process through an in-depth analysis of text and an exploration of the fundamental directing tools necessary for realizing the dramatic action of a text in production.

3

Prerequisites

THR 210 or permission of instructor

THR 385 Theatre Literature I

Analyzes major theatrical literary works from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Students examine plays both as literature and as performance pieces, analyzing the plays' dramatic structure and content, discussing their significance to theatre history, and examining them in light of how they would have been (and still may be) realized in performance. Students are encouraged to note not only how the theatre literature of each era changes but also what ties bind this literature together.

3

THR 386 Theatre Literature II

Analyzes major theatrical literary works from the Restoration to the present day. Students examine plays both as literature and as performance pieces, analyzing the plays' dramatic structure and content, discussing their significance to theatre history, and examining them in light of how they would have been (and still can be) realized in performance. Students are encouraged to note not only how the theatre literature of each era changes but also what ties bind this literature together.

3

THR 408 Playwriting

Is an introduction to the development of narrative line, character, and dialogue in an original dramatic text. By the end of the semester, the student will have completed a short play which will receive a staged reading and open critique.

3

Prerequisites

ENG 332 or permission of the instructor

Cross Listed Courses

ENG 408

THR 410 Advanced Directing

Requires students, through the process of directing student actors in four different scenes from major works of theatre literature, to demonstrate the ability to find and use new rehearsal methods for communicating successfully with actors, carefully analyzing scripts, and effectively transforming the scripted scene into a live performance. Three weekly laboratory hours in which the students will direct scenes from plays are required.

3

Prerequisites

THR 210 and THR 340

THR 420 Theory of Theatre

Challenges the student in a seminar-structured environment to examine the role of the theatre in society, tracing the purpose of theatre in society through dramatic criticism, from ancient Greece to the present day.

3

Prerequisites

Senior Theatre Major status or permission of instructor

THR 430 Advanced Acting: Characterization

Involves a study of the psycho-physical process of creating a character. Using scenes and monologues from great drama, students will do in-depth study and analysis of the plays and characters they work on during the semester.

3

Prerequisites

THR 310 or permission of instructor

THR 440 Production

Serves as a performance capstone to the drama major's work. During the course, the student will assume the role of designer-director and prepare a one-act text for presentation before the University community. The student will meet for a regular class and will direct the one-act play in a separate laboratory time.

3

Prerequisites

Senior Theatre Major

THR 450 Senior Thesis

Is a required course for all theatre majors who must research and write a thesis on an approved theatre-related topic. Students must consult closely with the drama faculty during each step of the research and writing process and present their findings to other theatre students at the end of the semester.

1