Courses

BUS 601 Business Ethics and the Law

This course will examine the legal dimensions of the employment relationship in a non-union setting. Students will become familiar with the employment-at-will doctrine and will understand the exceptions to that doctrine. Several federal laws will also be examined including Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the American with Disabilities Act, the Family Medical Leave Act, the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, the Eequal Pay Act, OSHA, and the Fair Labor Standards Act. The course will also cover other issues including privacy in the workplace, employment testing, and performance appraisals. The course will also provide students w with analysis of formal and informal initiatives, processes and structures developed by business organizations and managers to address common ethical problems at work in order to prepare students to participate in their organization's efforts to promote ethics at work.

3

BUS 612 Economics for Managers

This course aims to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding of microeconomic theory and its relevance to business decision-making. The heart of the course is an intensive examination of the neoclassical theories of demand, production, cost, and pricing.

3

BUS 613 Behavioral Science for Managers

The study of organizational behavior is a science primarily concerned with the description of the recording, analyzing, and explaining of what happens within organizations. The course is designed to assist the manager in seeing and understanding crucial aspects of the actions and interactions that take place within organizations. It takes many of the supposedly unteachable aspects of managerial judgment, and puts them into forms that permit them to be learned and applied.

3

BUS 614 Managerial Accounting

This course is designed to familiarize the students with the basic cost concepts and the techniques of accumulating cost data that may assist management in planning, controlling, and decision making. Topics will include the fundamentals of managerial accounting, cost classification and behavior, job order and process costing; absorption and variable costing; and standard costing and variance analysis. Budgeting and profit planning, cost-volume-profit analysis, capital budgeting, and investment analysis are also covered.

3

BUS 710 Marketing Management

The course focuses on the application of management tools and thoughts in the solution of problems centering in the marketing function. It covers such topics as: marketing policies, research, strategy, organization, demand analysis, product planning, pricing, physical distribution, demand stimulation, sales management, retailing and wholesaling techniques and structures, marketing law and current marketing literature. The course also involves case studies, various types of reports and oral presentations by students; and widespread reading in current marketing periodicals.

3

BUS 720 Financial Management

This course examines the application of management tools and thought to the solution of business problems centering in the financial function. Coverage includes topics such as financial management of business units with emphasis on organization, structure, collection and use of financial data; profitability, liquidity, sources of capital and external financial institutions, and their operations; taxes, regulation and types of lending markets and operations, insurance and risk management; investment objectives, types of investments and their relative merits, security prices and yields, investment programs and taxes.

3

Prerequisites

BUS 614.

BUS 730 Production and Operations Management

This course provides an understanding of the managerial concepts and quantitative tools required in the design, operation, and control of production systems. Coverage includes topics such as: productivity/ competitiveness, product design, process selection, staffing considerations, system start- up, steady-state operations, and other planning and control methods. All are couched in the framework of a product life cycle.

3

BUS 735 International Business

International Business provides the theoretical and analytical framework for students to exercise managerial decision making in the global context. The course will utilize various business and business-related disciplines in analyzing the international business environment and its impact upon organizations. The course is designed to assist students in developing an understanding of how business environments differ throughout the world, and political/legal, historical, institutional, economic, geographic, and social explanations for these differences.

3

BUS 811 Marketing Research

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of what market research can and cannot do and to introduce a basic structure for problem analysis. Subject matter includes scope and practice of marketing research, survey technique and questionnaire construction, experimental design, data collecting, and statistical techniques.

3

BUS 813 Marketing Communications

This course has a marketing management direction and orientation. The objective is to integrate the major elements of marketing communication in both consumer and industrial markets. These elements include advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, packaging, and publicity and public relations.

3

BUS 814 Sales Management and Integrated Marketing Communications

The course is structured to integrate two key aspects of the marketing practice-sales management and integrated marketing communications-which many companies struggle to integrate. Over the first six weeks we study sales management, including hiring, training, directing, motivating, and analyzing the sales force through selected readings, real-world case studies and classroom discussions. Over the next six weeks we study the integrated marketing communications function with emphasis on optimal decision-making by marketing managers related to problem-solving situations in advertising, public relations, branding, promotions, incentives, and social media. Over the last four weeks we study challenges and approaches to integrating these important functions as well as relevant ethical considerations in both areas.

3

BUS 815 Buyer Behavior

This course is designed to enable the student to understand, from a variety of perspectives, factors that affect buyer decision making. These include psychological, sociological, and cultural factors. Such an understanding provides a basis for marketing decisions that aim to enhance buyer satisfaction with the goods and services of the firm.

3

BUS 820 New Venture Management

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the major facets of starting or acquiring companies. Through case study, students practice finding a suitable opportunity, appraising profit potential, determining an acceptable purchase price, negotiating terms, and raising capital.

3

BUS 823 Business Forecasting

Business forecasting concentrates on quantitative approaches to forecasting, such as regression analysis, exponential smoothing and ARIMA models. Students will gain an understanding of the limits and diagnosis of forecast models, as well as the crucial role of sound human judgment.

3

BUS 825 Investment Management

This course offers an introduction to investment principles, the function of capital markets, the investment environment, and decision-making mechanisms for the selection of appropriate investments. Incorporated are techniques, instruments, and strategies for implementing investment goals in a portfolio context, consistent with risk/ return exposure. This course also provides a sound basis for management of personal financial resources.

3

BUS 830 Financial Accounting Theory

The development of financial accounting theory and practical application of that theory will be studied. Content will include review of the conceptual framework of financial accounting as promulgated by the FASB. Particular emphasis will be placed on the objectives of financial reporting, the elements of the financial statements, and the principles of recognition and measurement.

3

BUS 831 Governmental and Not-for- Profit Accounting

This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the accounting and financial management principles and practices associated with governmental and other not-for-profit entities. Special emphasis will be placed on state and municipal governments; however, coverage will also include the accounting/financial practices of colleges and universities, hospitals, and health and welfare agencies.

3

BUS 832 Audit Problems and Case Studies

This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth study of the audit process. The course will begin with a review of the attest function, including various phases of the audit process, such as engagement planning, audit control, and execution. Finally, coverage will return to compilation and review engagements.

3

BUS 833 Professional Ethics in Accounting

This course is designed to improve the quality of ethical decisions made by accounting students in the practice of their profession, by giving them a forum within which to encounter and debate the moral problems of the profession. Professional responsibilities of accountants in public and private practice will be examined, including responsibilities to clients, management, owners, colleagues, and society at large.

3

BUS 834 Corporate Tax Planning

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of corporate tax planning and its application to both corporate shareholders and estates. Subject matter includes types of business entities, determination of corporate net income, taxation of distributions to shareholders, and taxability of corporate formations and liquidations.

3

BUS 841 Microcomputers in Business

This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of various personal computer application programs. Subject matter includes an introduction to computers, use of Microsoft Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation tools, and database tools.

3

BUS 842 Human Resource Management

This course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of human resource management. Topics include the nature of human resource management, staffing the organization, training and developing human resources, compensating strategies, employee relations and global HR.

3

BUS 851 Management Information Systems

This course is designed to equip managers to plan, organize, direct, and control the information resources of the firm; to help them work effectively with computer personnel; to enable them to discriminate among software products; and to instill a sense of urgency to stay abreast of rapid changes in the field of information technology that affect the strategic positioning of their firm.

3

BUS 860 Labor Economics

This course is designed to familiarize the student with neoclassical labor theory and the issues surrounding the labor market in the U.S. Subject matter includes, among other topics, demand for labor, demand elasticities, quasi-fixed labor costs, supply of labor, household production, and compensating wage differentials.

3

BUS 862 Current Economic Problems

This course is designed to provide the student with a knowledge of current problems in the economy. The subject matter of this course changes as economic issues change. Readings include publications of the Federal Reserve System, The National Association of Business Economists, as well as The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Fortune, Business Week, National Review, Conservative Chronicles, and others.

3

BUS 863 Government Regulation

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the major aspects of antitrust, economic, and social regulations as it relates to the firm. Subject matter includes, among other topics, the philosophy of regulation, consumer benefits, capture theory, public choice theory, airline regulation, energy regulation, job safety regulation, environmental regulation, and antitrust regulation.

3

BUS 870 International Operations

This course is designed to equip the student with an understanding of issues and firm strategy when a firm competes internationally. Subject matter includes country factors, global trade and investment environment, global monetary system, and strategy and structure of international business operations.

3

BUS 880 Communications Workshop

This course is designed to assist participants in the development and improvement of the communications techniques required for effective management. The course stresses the importance of communications for meeting organizational goals; recognizing and examining the causes of communications problems; and developing the communications knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to achieve effective performance. Lecture, role-playing, group discussions, and various exercises are used.

2

BUS 881 Managerial Leadership Work

This course is designed to help participants better understand the complexities of the role of a manager and to develop the organizational, leadership and motivational skills needed to be effective. It is also designed to help the participants better understand themselves and how they affect others in the work situation. The course uses lecture, role-playing, group discussion, and various exercises.

2

BUS 883 Healthcare Systems and Policy

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of major trends, issues, and problems confronting healthcare professionals and policy makers. Subject matter includes, among other topics, evolution of healthcare systems and policy, nursing issues, healthcare system reform, financing healthcare, managing healthcare costs, peer review organizations, and long-term care for the elderly.

3

BUS 890 Independent Research

Selected students will be permitted to complete a maximum of four credits of independent studies (two, two-credit electives, or one, four-credit elective). Guidance and supervision on individual research work will be provided by members of the graduate faculty.

2 to 4

BUS 900 Business Policy and Strategy

Students will analyze major decisions in the context of the entire philosophical framework of business through case studies. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of business to outside forces and to the integration of functional operations. The effects of major policy decisions on marketing, finance, manufacturing, and personnel will be analyzed. The course covers strategy, policy definition, planning, organizing, direction, control, and an in-depth look at management and its sources and responsibility. This course brings together all of the principles of business studied in previous courses. Oral and written presentations of case studies are used to further develop communication skills.

3

CAT 517 Catechetics

Provides an introduction to the history, methods, and contemporary practice in catechetics. The Church's catechetical documents are studied in depth, providing the necessary foundations for the other religious courses. Catechetical skills will be developed by analyzing specific doctrines in order to learn how to handle them in catechetical presentations, determining what is essential in presenting a catechesis that is systematic and organic. In addition, the students will be introduced to the life and educational practice of St. John Bosco.

3

Prerequisites

Pre/Co-requisite: CAT 120. For CAT majors only.

Cross Listed Courses

CAT 204

CAT 601 Biblical Catechetics

"The 'study of the sacred page' should be the very soul of sacred theology. The ministry of the Word... pastoral preaching, catechetics, and all forms of Christian instruction... is healthily nourished and thrives in holiness through the Word of Scripture" (DV 24). This course focuses on the centrality of Scripture in the work of catechesis. The content of the apostles' teaching and their use of Scripture, the scriptural basis of the catechesis of the Fathers and current magisterial documents related to Scripture and catechesis will be covered. Finally, this course explores the implementation of Scripture for evangelistic and catechetical purposes.

3

CAT 602 Deposit of Faith

This course will explore the effective delivery of the content of the Deposit of Faith for the purpose of promoting conversion to Jesus Christ. Kerygmatic catechesis and its emphasis on the means of insertion into the Mystery of Christ will provide the foundation for this exploration. A technique for analyzing doctrine for effective delivery will be employed with specific emphasis on the way in which such a delivery informs the faith, hope and love of the prospective disciple. Finally the challenges to employing a doctrinal delivery in the catechetical field today will be discussed.

3

CAT 603 The Pedagogy of God I

This course explores the foundational methodological vision and principles described in the magisterial catechetical documents. A theoretical study and practical application will be made of primary principles of catechetical methodology, including the interconnectedness which exists between catechetical methodology and the Deposit of Faith, the centrality of the pedagogy of God to a proper formulation and evaluation of catechetical methodology, the importance of teaching to the aim of conversion and the spiritual life of the catechist as the "soul of catechetical methodology."

3

CAT 604 The Pedagogy of God II

All catechetical methodology must be rooted in the Divine Pedagogy-how God teaches. This course will study the pedagogy of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Because catechesis must always be Christocentric, methodologies will be examined in the context of incarnational dynamism. Since God is truth, beauty, and goodness, this course will also look at specific methodologies in the context of these transcendentals, particularly in the use of art, music, literature, and film. This course should be taken at the end of the program and will evaluate a student's graduate level research and catechetical scholarship.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 603.

CAT 700 The New Evangelization

This course addresses selected contemporary questions that demand a mature response from the informed Christian. This course emphasizes guided thought into specific dogmatic, moral, and spiritual issues.

3

CAT 710 RCIA and the Catechumenate

The restoration of the ancient catechumenate was one of the major directives of the Second Vatican Council. We will begin with an understanding of the restoration of the catechumenal process which resulted in the Christian Initiation process of today. Primary texts for this section will include the ritual book (RCIA), GDC, and Fr. Yarnold's The Awe-Inspiring Rites of Initiation. We will come to understand the RCIA as a liturgical process, with an emphasis on the role of the initiation sacraments. We will examine the nature and means of the conversion process using the RCIA, catechetical documents, and Newman. Next, we will come to understand the ancient catechumenal origins of the modern RCIA. Finally, we will cover various special topics in the catechumenal process: evangelization, legal issues, and children and teens.

3

CAT 720 Liturgical Catechetics

This course examines the intrinsic relation between liturgy and catechesis in the work of evangelization. Careful analyses will be made of the twentieth century liturgical and catechetical renewal movements and their liturgical-catechetical emphases as well as the teaching of the Second Vatican Council and the subsequent magisterial catechetical documents on this topic. In addition to the academic exploration of the link between the two in the Church's life, students will also study how these theoretical emphases can affect pastoral practice, particularly through the work of planning sacramental preparation and mystagogical catechesis.

3

Prerequisites

THE 518: Theology of the Church and Sacraments or THE 732: Sacraments.

CAT 730 Philosophy for Catechetics

The course examines the relationship between philosophy and catechetics. It is in two parts. The first part reviews the teaching of the magisterium on this relationship, in particular in Aeterni Patris and Fides et Ratio, and then goes on to treat of questions of truth and rhetoric in the transmission of doctrine, studying the role of the catechist as witness and communicator. The second part of the course is an examination of the thought of St Thomas Aquinas and the relation of this thought to themes in the Deposit of Faith. Thus this part of the course enables students to engage with a single figure in some depth, a figure who is philosopher, theologian and preacher of the faith and who is consistently presented by the magisterium as worthy of special study.

3

CAT 740 The Catechetical Vision of the Second Vatican Council

During his speech opening the Second Vatican Council, Pope John XXIII stated that one of the purposes of the Council was to "guard the deposit of faith." This course will look at Church history through a catechetical hermeneutic, examining both the successes and failures of catechetical endeavors by reading some major works concerning the handing on of the faith from the time of the apostles to the Second Vatican Council. This course will examine the documents of the Second Vatican Council and their catechetical implications. It will also address the positive developments as well as the challenges encountered in post-conciliar catechesis, and will stress the renewal of catechesis as a result of Vatican II.

3

Prerequisites

THE 604.

CAT 742 Analyzing Doctrine

This course, building on the work undertaken in the graduate class, CAT 602: Deposit of Faith, examines the transmission of the faith, analyzing the elements involved in this transmission in light of what the Church calls the "original pedagogy" of the faith. Learning the craft of transmission according to this pedagogy is understood as the fostering of faith, hope and love through an intellectual, affective and practical environment that nurtures the development of one's relationship with Christ. The pattern of transmission is analyzed through a study of the annunciation narrative, with the different elements of proclamation, dialogue, questioning,application to life and so on, being inspired by this narrative. A detailed examination is made of the theological virtues of faith, hope and love, gifts that enable us to share in the "dialogue of salvation" and respond to the promptings of God, making a full assent and adherence to him.

3

Prerequisites

CAT 602

CAT 755 Contemporary Practices in Youth Ministry

According to the USCCB document, Renewing the Vision, "Youth ministry is the response of the Christian community to the needs of young people and the sharing of the unique gifts of youth with the larger community." This course provides an overview of contemporary practices in youth ministry and covers practical skills necessary to run a successful youth ministry program.

3

CAT 794 Catechetical Practice Today

This course will provide a survey of leadership, administrative, management, personal and public relations, policy, legal (civil and canonical), and professional development topics from a gospel perspective for the purpose of facilitating a successful transition to a parish or diocesan position within the Church. It will also explore the mind of the Church and best practices in the variety of catechetical disciplines found in the field today. Specifically it will include discussion of adult catechesis, family catechesis, youth ministry, campus ministry, Catholic schools, parish school of religion, DRE/catechist training, textbook evaluations, chastity education, and catechumenal ministry.

3

CSL 501 Counseling Research and Evaluation for Mental Health Counselors

This course will review topics and problems of current concern in counseling, research, and evaluation, including: design strategies, instrumentation, data analysis, significant studies, and other research is- sues. Students will propose a counseling research project as part of the course.

3

CSL 502 Human Growth and Personality Development

This course will present theories and research on the nature and needs of individuals at all levels of development, including intellectual, social, emotional, physical, and spiritual aspects of development. The development of normal and abnormal behavior, personality theory, and learning theory will also be discussed.

3

CSL 503 Professional, Ethical, and Legal Issues in Counseling

In this course, students will study the professional codes of ethics and standards of practice of the American Counseling Association (ACA). Students will become familiar with the licensure requirements and legal responsibilities of counselors.

3

CSL 504 Theories and Techniques of Clinical Mental Counseling I

This course entails an in-depth study of the role of the counselor, the theory, and the techniques of the major models of individual counseling. These models include the phenomenological-existential, behavioral, psychodynamic, social-psychological, reality, and rational emotive approaches to counseling.

3

CSL 505 Theories and Techniques of Clinical Mental Health Counseling II

This course will involve an in-depth study of the role of the counselor, the theory, and the techniques of marriage and family or systems approaches to counseling. These approaches include the structural, strategic, multi-generational, and other models.

3

CSL 520 Mental Health Appraisal

This introduction to basic appraisal techniques will focus on diagnostic interviewing; the use of rating scales; intelligence, personality (objective and projective), aptitude, and achievement measures in psychological and educational testing; and the interpretation of psychological reports. The process of mental status examinations and the use of the DSM and ICD-9 & 10 classification systems will also be presented.

3

CSL 521 Lifestyle and Career Development

This course is designed to equip the student with the necessary knowledge, skills, techniques, attitudes, and ethical standards for counseling clients regarding lifestyle and career decisions.

3

CSL 607 Issues in Psychological and Spiritual Integration

The major purpose of the course is to examine practical applications of pastoral psychology in relation to issues of human development, character deficiencies, and growth potentials that are used as a theoretical basis for pastoral counseling, therapeutic intervention, and spiritual direction.

3

CSL 608 Christian Mental Health Counseling Approaches

This course involves studying the theories and techniques of prominent Christian counselors. An evaluation will be made of these theories from the perspectives of psychology and theology.

3

CSL 621 Group Dynamics and Mental Health Counseling

This course will survey theories and techniques of group counseling to enable the counselor to work effectively with groups from a variety of client populations. Participation in a training group and experiences necessary to co-lead a therapeutic group are also provided.

3

CSL 623 Social and Cultural Foundations

This course is devoted to the study of various social-cultural counseling populations or problems such as: divorce, single-parent and remarried families, gender issues, minority counseling, teen pregnancy, child and spouse abuse, and other social issues.

3

CSL 624 Practicum in Mental Health Counseling

This practicum involves supervised counseling experience involving a minimum of 100 clock hours in a counseling field placement for the development of individual and group counseling skills. Graduate faculty will be the primary supervisors. Supervision will be provided both in small group and in one-to-one settings.

3

Prerequisites

CSL 504 and CSL 621 (or their equivalents) and permission of the Counseling Department.

CSL 625 Internship in Mental Health Counseling I

This internship involves the first semester of a two-semester field placement, including a minimum of 300 clock hours per semester at a public or private counseling setting. Students are expected to perform all of the counseling and related activities of a regularly employed (half-time) staff counselor. Supervision will be given by both an agency supervisor and a faculty supervisor. Faculty supervision will include small group and one-to-one supervision.

3

Prerequisites

CSL 624, CSL 504, CSL 505, CSL 520, CSL 621 (or their equivalents) and permission of the Counseling Department.

CSL 626 Internship in Mental Health Counseling II

This internship involves the second semester of a two-semester field placement including a minimum of 300 clock hours per semester at a public or private counseling setting. Students are expected to perform all of the counseling and related activities of a regularly employed (half time) staff counselor. Supervision will be given by both an agency supervisor and a faculty supervisor. Faculty supervision will include small group and one-to-one supervision. Students will participate in a capstone experience project, including the completion of an integrated theoretical paper and an illustrative counseling case.

3

Prerequisites

CSL 625 and permission of the Counseling Department.

CSL 630 Advanced Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

This course is devoted to more in-depth study of special or advanced topics in counseling. Specific topics may vary from semester to semester. Special readings, writing, or practicum experiences may also be arranged for from one to four credits under this course title.

1-4

CSL 630PA Advanced Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: Clinical Psychopathology

Clinical psychopathology, personality, and abnormal behavior include studies that provide a broad understanding of abnormal behavior. Emphasis is placed on psychopathological conditions related to children, adolescents, young, middle-life adults, and the aged. The course also includes studies of specific personality theories and their application to mental health work.

4

Prerequisites

24 semester credit hours

CSL 630PB Advanced Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: Advanced Assessment

The purpose of this course is to increase understanding of administration, scoring, and the interpretation of tests and other data from clinical assessment. Attention will be given to major tests, inventories, and techniques and to the reporting of data from intellectual, achievement, and personality assessment.

4

Prerequisites

CSL 520 and 21 semester credit hours

CSL 630PC Advanced Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: DSM

This course develops a framework for identifying the signs and symptoms of a clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or pattern that occurs in an individual that is considered a manifestation of behavioral, psychological, or biological dysfunction and that is associated with present distress or disability. It includes use of the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) and methods for conducting Mental Status examinations.

4

Prerequisites

24 semester credit hours

CSL 630PD Advanced Topics in CHMC: Human Sexuality and Christian Marriage and Family Counseling

This course seeks to increase counseling skills, with a focus on the unique dynamics of marriage and family counseling. Family systems theory and technique will be presented and evaluated from a Christian perspective.

4

Prerequisites

CSL 505 and 24 semester credit hours

CSL 630PE Advanced Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: Psychopharmacology

This course is intended to familiarize counselors with the basic terminology of pharmacology and to develop a basic understanding of psychopharmacology as applicable in their work as therapists. Emphasis is placed on anatomy and physiology of the brain, commonly used drugs (both legal and illegal), medications in the treatment of depression, anxiety, psychosis, mania, and their possible side effects.

4

Prerequisites

24 semester credit hours

CSL 630PJ Advanced Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: Cognitive-Behavior Therapy

This course explores the contributions of major theorists/practitioners in Cognitive-Behavior Therapy, with an accent on applications to current counseling situations.

4

Prerequisites

24 semester credit hours

CSL 630PK Advanced Topics in Clinical Mental Health Counseling: Substance Abuse

The course examines the relationships between historical and current trends in substance counseling, process, theory, and technique. Emphasis will be placed on assessment, diagnosis, neuro-physiology, and treatment of substance abuse disorders. The role of 12-step principles and practices as well as the spiritual/psychological nature of addiction will be examined to ensure a holistic understanding of substance abuse disorders.

4

Prerequisites

24 semester credit hours

CSL 630PL Pastoral Counseling

This course focuses on methods of counseling clients with personal spiritual problems with emphasis on those modes of pastoral counseling most in practice today.

4

CSL 636 Mental Health Counseling Consultation & Supervision

This course emphasizes the role of supervision and consultation as a vital component in counselor growth. It is intended to explore major supervisory and consultation models, processes of supervision and the supervisor relationship, the role of evaluation in supervision, and ethical issues in supervision.

2

EDU 502 Philosophical Studies in Education

This course will look at what part of society was educated for what purpose, by what means, and with what assumptions at several vital junctures in history. It will require the student to examine the correlations between historical and philosophical trends and educational practices and outcomes. It will look at the relationship between power and learning and the evolution of our present educational systems.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 503 Educational Research Methodology

In this course, students will learn how to conduct original research in educational settings. The course will begin with a general discussion of the assumptions and procedures of educational research. Then, students will examine specific experimental and non-experimental designs commonly used by educational researchers. Students will discuss the assumptions and operations of descriptive and inferential statistics that are used to analyze research results. Finally, students will develop a research proposal that will express clearly and precisely his or her own research plans.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

Prerequisites

Research proposal forms MUST be approved by the academic advisor in advance of EDU 503. THIS IS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 570.

EDU 504 Human Development and Education

This course is the study and critical review of developmental theories such as those of Piaget, Kohlberg, Erikson, and Skinner as well as contemporary approaches such as Brain Based Learning. The focus of the course is on the implications of these theories upon teaching practices.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 505 Educational Leadership

This course introduces effective individual and group leadership theories and characteristics. Students will explore essential entry-level PK-12 administrative competencies to build positive school cultures, improve student academic achievement, sustain reform initiatives, advance participatory decision- making and problem solving, institute change, and resolve conflict through fundamental human relations talents as well as vital oral and written communication skills.

3

EDU 506 The Student and Deviant Behavior

The content of the course affords individuals the opportunity to exercise the emotional, mental, and physical handicapping conditions (psychological, sociological, and physiological) causing the students to deviate, temporarily or permanently, from established expectations of normal behavior.

3

EDU 508 Computers for School Administrators

This course affords students an opportunity to advance their technology-related productivity skills useful in managing today's schools. Students will create administrative-type word processing documents, spreadsheets, PowerPoint presentations, blogs, podcasts, and Web sites. Taking technology into consideration, the course also examines the administrator's role in planning, data collection, technical support, legal issues, funding, professional development and staff evaluation using Smartphones.

3

EDU 509 Supervision

This course in the theory and practice of supervision is designed to explore essential concepts and skills necessary in providing leadership in the improvement of teaching and learning. Emphasis will be placed on concepts and means of providing leadership in the supervisory task areas.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

Prerequisites

EDU 509 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 510.

EDU 510 Instructional Leadership

Course focus is on developing skills and attitudes essential in helping others to expand/refine their instructional effectiveness. Activities include helping teachers use alternative models of teaching, diagnosing learner needs, prescribing appropriate student learning approaches, and utilizing observational data.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 509 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 510.

EDU 511 Curriculum

This course addresses the leadership role in the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. The course focuses on the impacting aspects of curriculum leadership, such as the history of curriculum development; importance of curriculum; the politics of curriculum; roles various parties play in curriculum; the importance to curriculum of the learner; knowledge; and the needs of society. Current issues in curriculum are part of the course, as are practical skills such as curriculum mapping and curriculum alignment. Lastly, the course is intended to motivate students regarding role and potential of their role in curriculum leadership.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

Prerequisites

EDU 511 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 512.

EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership

This course requires the synthesizing of research on leadership principles as these principles pertain to the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. Secondly, the course will provide problem-solving opportunities for students to address some of the concerns facing the development and implementation of curriculum with particular reference to current curriculum issues and trends. Lastly, the course is meant to serve as a stimulus to help students integrate and organize knowledge bases in the area of curriculum.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 511 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 512

EDU 513 Models of Teaching

This course provides an analysis and experimentation with various models of teaching that can be useful in studying classroom interaction and evaluating teaching-learning performance.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 514 Individual Study in Education/Educational Administration

This course is intended to provide an opportunity for graduate students to explore topics that are of interest or concern to them but that might not be covered in a regular course in education/administration. The choice of one to three semester hours is given so the student can explore the topic in more or less depth as his or her needs dictate.

3

EDU 515 Prehistoric Archaeology Field School for Educators

The purpose of this program is to develop a teaching unit in prehistoric archaeology. The teaching unit will include verbal discussions and color slides on the following topics: (1) Prehistoric Archives Review; (2) Prehistoric Literature Searches; (3) Prehistoric Site Preparation; (4) Site Surface Surveying; (5) Site Test Excavation Methods; (6) Site and Feature Mapping Techniques; (7) Excavation Interpretations; (8) Artifact and Ecofact Recordation; (9) Volumetric Soil Sampling and Analytical Methods; (10) Preliminary Laboratory Data Processing and Analyses.

3

EDU 516 Historic Archaeology Field School for Educators

The purpose of this program is to develop a teaching unit in historic archaeology. The teaching unit will include verbal discussions and color slides on the following topics: (1) Historical Archives Review; (2) Historical Literature Searches; (3) Historic Site Preparation; (4) Site Surface Surveying; (5) Site Test Excavation Methods; (6) Site and Feature Mapping Techniques; (7) Excavation Interpretations; Artifact and Ecofact Recordation; (9) Volumetric Soil Sampling and Analytical Methods; (10) Preliminary Laboratory Data Processing and Analyses.

3

EDU 517 Trends and Issues in Social Studies

Trends and issues are examined that influence a social studies program, philosophy, curriculum, and methodology.

3

EDU 518 An Integrated Approach to Social Studies and Science

This course entails how to design a fused curriculum emphasizing the social studies and science content areas.

3

EDU 519 Science Education

This content course in science is designed to prepare the elementary student teacher to effectively perform all teaching tasks associated with the teaching of elementary school science. Emphasis is placed upon laboratory techniques and the scientific method of solving problems.

3

EDU 520 Teaching Great Books

This course is intended to prepare teachers to develop the seminar approach to lead discussions of the major ideas of world culture with high school students grades 9 to 12. The primary tool will be important works of literature, philosophy, and science that have stood the test of time and become important cultural influences.

3

EDU 525 The Catholic Educator: Vision and Strategies

Designed to promote and enrich a student's own quest to integrate being a Catholic and being an educator. We will initiate a dialogue between the contemporary situation in education and the Catholic heritage, identifying central elements, values, and attitudes in each. This dialogue will allow us to thematize a personal vision and to generate practical strategies for incarnating this vision in our lives as Catholic educators.

3

EDU 536 Phonics

This course seeks to equip teachers to understand the linguistic principles underlying the process of learning to read, so that they might develop their own strategies to facilitate that process. Before studying specific methods of phonics instruction, students will first learn the physiology of the vocal mechanism (phonetics), conventions of representing sounds in writing (phonography), and the history of language development, so that they might easily adapt to any "system" of phonics instruction. Because it is the scientific principles behind word formation that are studied, and not simply the code- cracking process of early readers, this material can be applied at any level of instruction, K-12 and beyond.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 536ST Special Topics in Education

Issues of current national or regional interest to teachers (i.e., accountability, testing of teachers, etc.) are studied.

3

EDU 536T1 Technology: History and Development

This course examines how technology has advanced over time. It examines the question of how technology encompasses humans and society and ways in which technology influences societies. Reading on significant historical works is included.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 536T2 Development of Instructional Materials and Web-based Instructional Design

This course will focus on design and development of media and instructional units for education in the technologies. This course also addresses the concepts and applications of web-based instructional design as they direct the effective integration of Internet activities and resources into a teaching/learning environment.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 539 Computers in Education

Through this course, educators will acquire the knowledge and skills needed to effectively use computers to enhance instruction. Topics include word processing, spreadsheets, database, electronic grade books, LogoWriter, multimedia, and classroom management. Educators will develop teaching, critical thinking, planning, problem-solving, and lifelong learning skills.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 540 Advanced Computers in Education

This course focuses on the practical application of Web 2.0 tools in the design, development, and evaluation of synchronous and asynchronous e-learning. Additionally, an examination of Web 2.0 tools as a means to promote and enhance collaboration, professional development, and communication in education will be undertaken.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 541 School and Society

This course examines social, cultural, and economic forces, including curricula and reform initiatives that affect schools as well as teachers, students, and parents. This course encourages students to value, embrace, and affirm the cultural, racial, class and gender diversity of both their local and global communities. Students also participate in an embedded field experience.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 543 Literature for Children and Adolescents

Student will study children's books to develop critical and ethical standards for judgment. Guidance is given in selection of books for specific needs, interests, and reading abilities in eight genres and in instructional techniques for use in the classroom. Preschool through senior high school levels are covered.

3

EDU 545 Advanced Developmental Reading

The psychological and sociological basis in reading is covered in this course, with attention to linguistics, materials, skills, literature, and evaluation. This first course is designed to prepare specialists in reading.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

Prerequisites

THIS IS A PREREQUISITE FOR OTHER COURSES IN THE READING SEQUENCE.

EDU 546 Research in Reading Instruction

This is a basic course for teachers concerned with the psychology of learning reading and with current problems and trends in reading and children's literature.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 547 Diagnosing of Reading Difficulties

Students in this course study and use informal and formal diagnostic tools for determining reading levels for remedial or advanced reading skills.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 548 Practicum in Diagnosis of Reading Difficulties

This course is a supervised practicum experience (two hours daily; five weeks) in which clinicians will develop an individualized reading program for no more than two students. Each clinician will plan, di- agnose, implement, and evaluate the students, hold conferences, and prepare exit reports for the children for whom they are responsible.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 554 Reading in the Content Areas

This course offers a study of reading problems and techniques for teaching vocabulary and reading skills in various content areas. Clinical experience (eight hours); plus field experience for secondary education majors is required.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I

This course provides opportunities for the student to experience supervisory/ administrative responsibilities in a supervised, planned, and personalized program. The course work is designed to have the student execute 12 administrative proficiencies dealing with the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC Standards). The student will work with a practicing school administrator who will guide, direct, and evaluate the student's attainment of the proficiencies selected for the experiences. A graduate education faculty member will be assigned to the student to supervise the total experience and arrange for individual and two group meetings throughout the semester. The student will complete a minimum of 150 hours of field work through the completion of EDU 560.

3

EDU 570 Master's Project

The Master's Project is a research project well-grounded in the degree being sought, Educational Administration or Education. Four mandatory group meetings will focus on: 

  1. Review of the project progress made through completion of the prerequisite course, EDU 503
  2. Report and discussion dealing with Chapter 4 of the Master's Project-Results. 
  3. Report and discussion with Chapter 5 of the Master's Project-Discussion Conclusions, Implications, and Recommendations. 
  4. Report and discussion of finalized Master's Project and preparation for the scheduled Exit Conference. 

Other class meetings shall be arranged with the assigned professor.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

Prerequisites

EDU 503

EDU 601 Early Childhood Administration

Understanding child development, child management, and developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) for teaching young children (ages 3 to 8), will be the foundation for building leadership skills for early childhood administrators. Based on the foundation of understanding the child, there will be an emphasis on curriculum leadership, inclusion, licensure rules and regulations, parents and school relations, professional ethics, and personnel and staff development. Other administrative tasks and skills will be addressed as well as organizational planning and strategies for administering an early childhood program.

3

Notes

Course is alsooffered online.

EDU 603 Elementary and Middle School Administration

Emphasis is placed on the application of the administering process as well as research on school effectiveness to the elementary and middle school setting. Focus will include administering the day-to- day operations and efforts designed to improve the total organization. Implementing operational plans, managing financial resources, and applying decentralized management processes and procedures will receive major attention.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 605 Secondary School Administration

The major objective of this course is to help students identify successful models of secondary school administration. This goal requires that students, through research, analysis, synthesis and decision making, arrive at a hypothetical model of an effective secondary school administrator. Secondly, the course develops an understanding of the principles involved in being a successful secondary administrator. Lastly, the course is meant to provide the student with sufficient insight to initially administer the day-to-day operation of a secondary school.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 607 Staff Personnel and Public Relations

The purpose of this course is to evaluate the primary steps and procedures in an effective staff personnel program, namely understanding the personnel function (planning, allocating, coordinating, influencing, and appraising), purposes of the personnel function, determining personnel needs, establishing a compensation structure, recruiting, selecting, inducting and in-servicing. Secondly, the course will identify the principles of a good school public relations program, establishing a master public relations plan, and working successfully with the media, parents, and public groups.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

EDU 615 School Law

This course instructs students on public education's legal foundations, including constitutional, statutory, board policy, and case law within which a school must function. School administrative practices related to federal regulations and rulings with consideration given to state and local matters when applicable are the course's focus. Major topics include school governance, staff employment, teachers' and students' rights, tort liability, collective bargaining, student attendance and records, and disabled student rights. As aspiring school principals, students demonstrate their ability to apply the federal, state and local legal principles that govern practices and operations in PK-12 schools by analyzing selected case studies and scenarios.

3

EDU 617 School Finance

This course informs students on various school revenue sources, including local, state and federal funding systems. As well, the course explains the federal and state government's sources of income. In the course students review financial reports, such as appropriation measures, five-year forecasts, audits, and budgets. Students examine purchasing practices and school expenditures, including risk management programs, construction projects, and collective bargaining along with competitive bidding mandates. The course includes an experimental learning assignment in which students develop a grant.

3

EDU 621 Planned Field Experience II (Planning for School Management)

This course extends experiences gained through the prerequisite course and EDU 560 Planned Field Experience I and provides opportunities for the student to experience supervisory/administrative responsibilities in a supervised, planned, and personalized program. The course is designed to have the student execute 12 administrative proficiencies dealing with the Educational Leadership Constituent Council (ELCC Standards). The proficiencies are designed for limited and sustained participation. The student will work with a practicing administrator who will guide, direct, and evaluate the student's attainment of the advanced proficiencies selected for the experiences. A graduate education faculty member will be assigned to the student to supervise the total experience and arrange for individual and two group meetings throughout the semester. The student will complete a minimum of 150 hours of fieldwork through the completion of EDU 621.

3

Notes

Course is also offered online.

Prerequisites

EDU 560

EDU 715 School Law II

This course extends knowledge, dispositions, and administrative practices related to public education law beyond those skills learned in EDU 615. School administrative procedures related to state and local regulations and rulings with consideration given to federal matters when applicable are the course's focus. Major topics include school governance, staff employment, teachers' and students' rights, tort liability, collective bargaining, student attendance records, and disabled student rights. As aspiring school superintendents, students are able to apply the federal, state and local legal principles to lead PK-12 school practices and operations upon completion of this course.

3

Notes

Taught using hybrid format including both on campus and online sessions.

Prerequisites

EDU 615

EDU 716 School Business Affairs

This course extends knowledge, dispositions, and school business practices related to public education finance beyond those skills learned in EDU 617. Students examine purchasing practices in depth a well as school expenditures, including risk management programs and construction projects along with competitive bidding mandates. Other school business functions studied include managing personnel, purchasing, accounting, district investing, managing facilities and capital assets, as well as overseeing the district's transportation, food service, security, and technology services. The course includes the following experiential learning assignments in which students complete district fiscal analysis, develop a competitive bid, and create a spending reduction plan.

3

Notes

Taught using hybrid format including both on campus and online sessions.

EDU 511 Curriculum

This course addresses the leadership role in the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. The course focuses on the impacting aspects of curriculum leadership, such as the history of curriculum development; importance of curriculum; the politics of curriculum; roles various parties play in curriculum; the importance to curriculum of the learner; knowledge; and the needs of society. Current issues in curriculum are part of the course, as are practical skills such as curriculum mapping and curriculum alignment. Lastly, the course is intended to motivate students regarding role and potential of their role in curriculum leadership.

Credit Hours 3

Prerequisite(s)s

EDU 511 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 512.

EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership

This course requires the synthesizing of research on leadership principles as these principles pertain to the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. Secondly, the course will provide problem-solving opportunities for students to address some of the concerns facing the development and implementation of curriculum with particular reference to current curriculum issues and trends. Lastly, the course is meant to serve as a stimulus to help students integrate and organize knowledge bases in the area of curriculum.

Credit Hours 3

Prerequisite(s)s

EDU 511 Curriculum

This course addresses the leadership role in the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. The course focuses on the impacting aspects of curriculum leadership, such as the history of curriculum development; importance of curriculum; the politics of curriculum; roles various parties play in curriculum; the importance to curriculum of the learner; knowledge; and the needs of society. Current issues in curriculum are part of the course, as are practical skills such as curriculum mapping and curriculum alignment. Lastly, the course is intended to motivate students regarding role and potential of their role in curriculum leadership.

Credit Hours 3

Prerequisite(s)s

EDU 511 IS NOT REQUIRED BUT STRONGLY RECOMMENDED AS A PREREQUISITE FOR EDU 512.

EDU 512 Curriculum Leadership

This course requires the synthesizing of research on leadership principles as these principles pertain to the development, implementation, and evaluation of curriculum. Secondly, the course will provide problem-solving opportunities for students to address some of the concerns facing the development and implementation of curriculum with particular reference to current curriculum issues and trends. Lastly, the course is meant to serve as a stimulus to help students integrate and organize knowledge bases in the area of curriculum.

Credit Hours 3

Prerequisite(s)s

Prerequisites

EDU 617

EDU 718 The Superintendency

This course deals with understanding the duties and responsibilities of the modern-day superintendent, who is viewed as the leader of the school system. Particular emphasis is placed on the forces in the organization, in the environment, and within the human system that influence the superintendency.

3

Notes

Taught in hybrid format using both on campus and online sessions.

EDU 722 Collective Bargaining and Contract Management

This course requires a study and understanding of the views of teacher associations or unions and boards of education (through their superintendent or personal negotiator) regarding the processes and procedures of collective bargaining. Secondly, the course promotes an understanding of the procedures of living within a negotiated agreement on the part of teachers and administrators. A study of the complete collective bargaining process, from developing proposals to agreement or strike, including an intensive bargaining simulation of an actual agreement, are part of the course. Lastly, EDU 722 will consider significant topics such as the desired skills on the part of board and teacher negotiators, how to handle negotiation breakdowns, and the anticipated changes in the collective bargaining process for the future.

3

Notes

Taught using hybrid format including both on campus and online sessions.

EDU 723 Contemporary Education Issues and the School Administrator

This course offers a comprehensive examination of the many varied proposals for restructuring schools today. Emphasis is given to the understanding of what can be achieved through particular restructuring efforts and the role administrators can play to make such efforts succeed.

3

Advanced Topic Elective(s)

Electives

6

Four 800-level courses

Four Electives

OR

or another approved course

Two 700-level courses

NUR 601 Theoretical Foundations

In this course, various theories applicable for advanced practice nursing, curriculum development, and research are examined. Theories are evaluated for patterns of knowledge, levels of theory development, and utility. Theories are analyzed, taking into account patient needs, values, and interpersonal relationships utilized in advanced practice. This course is recommended early in the program.

2

NUR 620 Health Promotion

This course focuses on theories of health promotion and disease prevention. Biological, behavioral, social, nutritional, environmental, cultural, spiritual, and epidemiological data that reflect the health needs of individuals of all ages, families, and groups are explored. Master-prepared nurses must assume the advocate role for society when identifying health risks and developing holistic multidisciplinary interventions for health promotion. Recommended prior to role practicums in both FNP and ES curriculums. Two credits of theory and one credit of clinical.*

3

NUR 621 Health Promotion Clinical

Master's prepared nurses must assume the advocate role for society when identifying health risks and developing holistic multidisciplinary interventions for health promotion. This course is recommended prior to other clinical experiences in the FNP curriculum. (One credit hour = 45 hours of clinical practice).

1

NUR 630 Bioethics in Nursing

Christian and Catholic moral theology will provide a basis for the examination of autonomy and personal responsibility in various nursing contexts. Analyses of current ethical issues in advanced practice nursing are explored. The impact of Christian values and Church teaching on the professional role of the advanced practice nurse are examined. Three credits of theory.

3

NUR 641 Health Care Systems

This course addresses the role of government and public institutions in the health and welfare of people. The influence of cost-driven modes of health care such as managed care and integrated health care systems will be evaluated. Models for financing, budgeting, and strategic planning that reflect current health care organizational trends and the Church's teaching on social action provides a basis for approaching political, organizational, and financial issues in health, nursing, and health education. The advanced practice role in facilitating and influencing political, financial, and organizational policy will be discussed. Funding sources will be examined, including community and population-based systems that serve vulnerable populations. Three credits of theory.

3

NUR 650 Advanced Practice Role

Professional ethics, accountability, and responsibility of advanced practice nurses and education specialists are the focus of this course. State and federal laws regulating advanced nursing practice, credentialing, and standards of practice in both nurse practitioner and nurse educator roles will be carefully reviewed. Two credits of theory.

2

NUR 655 Advanced Pathophysiology

Through a systems approach, master's-prepared nursing students will learn to interpret physiology and related pathology of diseases. Responses to illness and treatment will be assessed across the life span. Current research related to disease in the primary health care setting will be the focus. Three credits of theory. Prerequisite for NUR 660 and NUR 670.

3

NUR 660 Advanced Assessment

This course focuses on routine screening, assessment skills, diagnostics, and diagnostic instrumentation used by the master's-prepared nursing student in the primary health care setting. Clinical practice related to individual needs will be independently developed. Two credits of theory and one credit of clinical. Prerequisite for all FNP Specialization Core Courses.

3

Prerequisites

NUR 655.

NUR 670 Advanced Pharmacology and Therapeutics

Pharmacological principles, nutritional, and other treatment modalities, including responses on the cellular level are presented. In order to plan and provide safe health care, pharmacotherapeutics of broad categories of drugs used by advanced practice nurses and masters-prepared nursing students in primary care, and current trends in nutrition and alternative treatment modalities will be reviewed. Three credits of theory. Prerequisite for all FNP Specialization Core Courses.

3

Prerequisites

NUR 655

NUR 676 Quantitative Nursing Research Methods

This course focuses on an empirical approach to research. The philosophical underpinnings of this approach will be discussed. Quantitative research methods and appropriate analysis and interpretation of findings will be explored. The use of information technology by the advanced practice nurse is stressed. Research funding priorities, ethical treatment of human subjects, and the concept of evidence-based practice and educational utilization will be emphasized. Two credits of theory. Prerequisite for NUR 690 and NUR 695.

2

NUR 677 Qualitative Nursing Research Methods

This course focuses on an experiential process of acquiring scientific knowledge. The philosophical underpinnings of various qualitative research methods and analysis will be explored, while the use of triangulation and additional methods to establish trustworthiness of findings will be discussed. Ethical considerations and dissemination of qualitative findings will be emphasized, and the use of qualitative research for concept and theory development will be explored. Two credits of theory. Prerequisite for NUR 690 and NUR 695.

2

NUR 685 Human Diversity and Social Issues

This course focuses on cultural norms of individuals of varied racial and ethnic backgrounds. Universal aspects of culture addressed in the course include: health care practices, patterns of communication, kinship, education, diet, religion, art, politics, and economics. The advanced practice nurse's under- standing of health problems related to social issues and lifestyle choices is discussed utilizing the Christian/Catholic viewpoint as the framework for teaching. Two credits of theory.

2

Notes

Students may take either NUR 690 Thesis or NUR 695 Research Option.

NUR 690 Thesis

This course is an independent scientific research study conducted over three semesters. The Thesis Committee will consist of a chairperson (a doctoral-prepared Franciscan University nursing faculty member) and two other members (one master's or doctoral -prepared nursing faculty member and one outside master's or doctoral-prepared person). Replication of nursing research studies is highly recommended. Three credits taken over three semesters (1 credit per semester).

3

Prerequisites

NUR 676, NUR 677.

NUR 695 Research Option

Participation in scientific research activities is the focus of this course. Students who choose the research option in lieu of the thesis have the opportunity to learn from and participate with experienced researchers in research-related activities. Three credits taken during one semester Research Practicum Course.

3

Prerequisites

NUR 676, NUR 677.

NUR 810 Health Problems I

This course allows the family nurse practitioner to examine common health problems of the childbearing family, infant, child, and adolescent population. Emphasis is on health promotion and disease prevention using a developmental approach. Treatment modalities for primary health care needs are the focus. Three credits of theory and one credit of clinical. Prerequisite for NUR 830.

4

Prerequisites

NUR 655, NUR 660, NUR 670

NUR 820 Health Problems II

This course allows the family nurse practitioner to examine common health problems of men and women from early adulthood through the geriatric population. Emphasis is on health promotion and disease prevention using a developmental approach. Treatment modalities for primary health care needs are the focus. Three credits of theory and one credit of clinical. Prerequisite for NUR 830.

4

Prerequisites

NUR 655, NUR 660, NUR 670

NUR 830 Primary Health Care Management

This course adds to the knowledge gained in Nursing 810 and Nursing 820. A case study approach is used by family nurse practitioners to refine differential diagnostic skills and clinical protocols for more complex health problems for all clients. One credit of theory and three credits of clinical.

4

Prerequisites

NUR 655, NUR 660, NUR 670; Pre/Co-requisite for NUR 850.

NUR 850 FNP Role Practicum

Family Nurse Practitioner students have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills under preceptorship of experienced nurse practitioners or physicians in primary care settings. Five credits of clinical role practicum.

5

Notes

A minimum of 540 clinical hours is required for FNP.

Prerequisites

NUR 655, NUR 660, NUR 670; Pre/Co-requisite: NUR 830 It is recommended that students take their FNP Role Practicum with NUR 830.

PHL 503 Philosophy of the Human Person

Studies what it is to say that human beings are persons and have freedom and subjectivity; the different powers of the human person, including the powers of understanding, willing, feeling, and loving; the difference between body and soul in human beings, and the unity of the two; and the question of the immortality of the soul. Some classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read. This is a particularly fundamental course that underlies many of the other courses.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHL 113

PHL 511 Metaphysics

Begins by asking what metaphysical questions are. One then poses selected metaphysical questions, such as what becoming is, what time is, what goodness is, what it means for a thing to exist, what the transcendental properties of being are, and, as the supreme question of metaphysics, whether God exists. Some classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHL 211

PHL 512 Foundations of Ethics

Inquires into the significance of moral good and evil in the life of the human person; into moral virtue and vice (or moral character); into moral obligation; right and wrong actions; moral laws and the problem of exceptions; and the place of conscience in the moral life. One also studies the con- temporary debate between consequentialist and deontological ethics, and the claims of ethical relativism. Some classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHL 212

PHL 526 Epistemology

Inquires whether is it possible for the human mind to know anything as it really is, and studies the philosophers who have affirmed and those who have skeptically denied this possibility. One inquires into the place of knowledge in the existence of the human person, asking what it is about persons that enables them to know; one also inquires into the social and historical conditions of knowing. One proceeds to distinguish different kinds and degrees of knowledge, as well as different sources of error. Attention is given throughout to the role of the senses in knowing. Classic texts from the tradition of Western philosophy are read.

3

Cross Listed Courses

PHL 306

PHL 611 Aesthetics

One studies first the metaphysics of beauty, which involves issues such as beauty and being, beauty and good, and divine beauty. Then one studies beauty in the fine arts, in literature, and in nature as well as the place of beauty in the life of the human person. The course also includes questions that do not directly concern beauty, such as the essence of the tragic and of the comic.

3

PHL 622 Philosophy of Community

One asks what it means to say with Aristotle that man is a social animal, and then studies how modern philosophies of intersubjectivity (Hegel, Scheler, Levinas, von Hildebrand) have contributed to our understanding of the relation of each person to others. One also inquires into the structure of communities, such as the family, the state, mankind, and how the individual can participate in these communities in a manner appropriate to their personhood.

3

PHL 624 Philosophy of Science

One studies questions first raised by Aristotle in his Physics, such as the questions regarding space, time, matter, and number. One is also introduced to the philosophical problems arising from contemporary science, such as from the theory of relativity or the theory of evolution. The philosophical assumptions of some of the sciences are explored. Questions of scientific method are raised.

3

PHL 625 Philosophy of God

One inquires whether the existence of God can be proved, and studies some of the main attempts to prove it (including the cosmological, the teleological, the ontological, and the moral proofs). One studies the problems of speaking about God without anthropomorphism (that is, speaking in such a way as not to reduce God to a finite being). One comes to grips with the main objections to traditional theism, such as those of Kant and Hume, and those of process theology, and with the attempt to disprove the existence of God on the basis of the evil in the world.

3

PHL 626 Philosophy of Law

One studies the different orders of law, especially the natural moral law and the positive law of the state, and their interrelations; this involves issues such as justice, authority, the is-ought distinction, the common good, and state punishment. Aquinas' Treatise on Law is typically read, as are modern authors such as Hegel, Kelsen, and Reinach.

3

PHL 628 The Nature of Love

One studies this special area of the philosophy of the human person, looking closely at the personal response of love and the interpersonal relationship constituted by love. One studies the role both of the will and of the emotions in the act of loving. The relations between love and happiness, love and unity, and love and morality are explored. Different types of love may be examined, such as eros, agape, love of friendship, and familial loves. Betrothed love and its expression in and through the body sexually are also discussed. Both classical (e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Scotus, Bernard of Clairvaux) and modern (e.g., Kierkegaard, Buber, Marcel, von Hildebrand, Pieper, Wojtyla) sources are utilized.

3

PHL 632 Philosophy of Language

One inquires into what the meaning of a word is, and into the kind of reality that meaning has. One studies the "performative" functions of language that philosophers have only recently noticed, and also the emotive and prescriptive force of language; one is introduced to recent philosophical studies of grammar, and also to the function of language in religion. One inquires into the place of language in the existence of person, asking whether language is only an instrument of communication and action, or a realm in which the human person dwells.

3

PHL 645 Special Topics in Bioethics

A treatment of selected issues in bioethics, such as: the dignity and identity of the human person, problems in end-of-life decisions, reproductive technology, the professional-patient relationship, theory of action and the principle of double effect, conscience and the health-care professional.

3

PHL 660 Ethics of Health Care Law and Social Policy

Examination and analysis of basic health care law, including that regarding beginning and end of life, reproductive issues, informed consent, confidentiality, right to refuse medical treatment, standard of care, malpractice, genetics, definition of death and organ transplantation.

3

PHL 670 Clinical Practicum

3 A clinically based practicum course in bioethics consists of supervised placement in ethics rotations in Pittsburgh-Steubenville area hospitals and hospices, and reading, writing, and discussion regarding clinical issues.

3

Prerequisites

Previous courses in ethics and bioethics are prerequisites, and admission requires prior arrangement with the instructor.

PHL 710 Philosophical Texts From Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

One studies closely some classic texts of ancient or medieval philosophy, such as Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Metaphysics, St. Augustine's De Trinitate, the works of St. Anselm, some part of the Summa Theologiae of St. Thomas, or some major work in the Franciscan tradition. The intent is to study the great works of philosophy more seriously than is possible when they are dealt with in other courses. This closer textual study will enable the students to deepen their understanding of the philosophical tradition in which they stand. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary from semester to semester.

3

PHL 720 Philosophical Texts from Modern and Contemporary Philosophy

3 One studies closely some classic texts of modern or contemporary philosophy, such as Descartes' Meditations, Kant's Critiques, the works of Nietzsche, Husserl's Logical Investigations, Sartre's Being and Nothingness, Scheler's Formalism in Ethics, Wittgenstein's Tractatus, Maritain's Degrees of Knowing, or Longergan's Insight. The intent is to appropriate critically the philosophical tradition in which we stand. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary from semester to semester.

3

PHL 735 Advanced Studies in the History of Philosophy

One studies not some main period of philosophy such as the medieval period. Rather this course introduces the student to a serious study of a specific school of philosophical thought, philosophical tradition within the history of philosophy, or philosophical problem within a historical setting. Examples include the influence of Neo-Platonism on medieval philosophy, analytic philosophy, the Muslim medieval tradition, contemporary Thomism, phenomenology, the influence of Scholastic philosophy on modern philosophy, existentialism, pragmatism, and the impact of Christian revelation on philosophy, or the concept of the agent intellect in medieval philosophy. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary.

3

PHL 815 Selected Issues in the Philosophy of the Human Person

One studies in depth a particular issue in philosophical anthropology. Examples include the problem of individuation, the nature of subjectivity, the relation between the soul and body, the immortality of the person, and issues involving acts of the human person such as love, freedom, or aesthetic enjoyment. Possible issues also include some topics that fall within social philosophy or the philosophy of community such as the nature of intersubjectivity, types of social acts, the nature of marriage and the family, the nature of the common good, and the relation between human beings and the state. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary.

3

PHL 825 Selected Issues in Metaphysics

This course examines in depth a particular topic in metaphysics. Examples include the transcendental properties of being, the relation between substance and accident, the problem of universals, what time is, and the relation between being and value. Possible topics include those that fall within the area of natural theology such as the cosmological arguments for the existence of God, the problem of God and evil, and the various attributes of God. This course also encompasses questions of ontology such as the ontology of certain aesthetic objects and the ontology of relations. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary.

3

PHL 835 Selected Issues in Epistemology

This course focuses on a particular topic in epistemology. Examples include the role of sense perception in knowledge, the nature of error, the difference between knowledge and opinion, the various forms of evidence in knowledge, and the social and historical conditions of knowledge. This course also encompasses issues in the philosophy of religion such as the relation between faith and knowledge and revelation as a source of religious knowledge. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary.

3

PHL 845 Selected Issues in Ethics

In this course one studies in depth a specific question or area of ethics such as sexual or environmental ethics, the nature of moral virtue and vice, the nature of conscience, and what natural law is. This course encompasses some topics that fall within the scope of political philosophy such as the nature of rights, the forms of justice, and the relation between moral obligation and duty. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary.

3

PHL 855 Selected Issues in Philosophical Logic

This course focuses on the specific topic in philosophical logic. Examples include principles of probability, tense logic, the nature of reference, set theory, the nature of conditional propositions, principles of modal logic, propositions and states of affairs, negative states of affairs, the status of logical laws, and logical atomism. This course can be taken more than once since its content will vary.

3

PHL 865 Foundations of Bioethics

A critical study of ethical principles for choices in health care issues: including natural law, other influential ethical theories, beginning of life, the health care professional-patient relationship, informed consent, truth-telling, issues surrounding procreation, genetic choices, end of life issues.

3

PHL 875 Bioethics: Clinical Issues

This course deals with issues such as informed consent, physician paternalism, terminating life- support, artificial reproduction, genetic engineering, cloning, stem-cell research. Catholic teaching on these issues is presented and examined.

3

PHL 910 Thesis Research

A thesis of 45 to 75 pages, which is to be orally defended, is required of all MA Philosophy students. The permission of the Director of MA Philosophy is needed in order to enroll in PHL 910. Students should consult the Director of MA Philosophy for further information regarding the conditions that must be met before they can enroll in Thesis Research and the guidelines for writing the thesis.

6

PHL 999 Thesis Extension

Registration for this optional non-credited course indicates that the student is involved in studies necessary for the completion of the MA degree in philosophy. At the end of each extension period the student must demonstrate progress toward the completion of the thesis. Master's students are allowed to register for PHL 999 no more than two (2) times. A matriculation fee is required. This fee entitles the student to the use of the library and other basic services.

0

THE 511 Principles of Biblical Study I

Is an introduction to the literature of the Old Testament: the Tetrateuch, the Deuteronomic corpus, the prophetic literature, the priestly writings, the wisdom literature, and the Deuterocanonical books. Students will be directed to read selections from the above categories. The theological-historical meaning of the Old Testament will be stressed.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

THE 211

THE 512 Principles of Biblical Study II

Is an introduction to the literature of the New Testament: the Synoptic Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, the Johannine literature, the Pauline literature, the Letter to the Hebrews, and the "catholic epistles." The theological-historical meaning of the New Testament will be stressed.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

THE 212

THE 513 Theology of Christ

Investigates the person and mission of Jesus Christ as articulated in the New Testament documents, in the early creedal formulae, and in the declarations of the Church Councils of the fourth, fifth and sixth centuries AD. Finally, students will be exposed to positions of great Catholic thinkers and contemporary scholars on various Christological questions.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

THE 213

THE 514 Theology of the Church

Examines the nature, history, and problems of the Christian community as understood in the Catholic tradition. Students undertake the task of investigating the biblical foundation of the Church, various branches of the Church, Christian authority, principles underlying church worship practices, church-state relationship, ecumenism, and other ecclesiological topics.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

THE 214

THE 515 Christian Moral Principles

Elucidates the principles of morality that regulate Christian living. These principles are studied as they are found rooted in the New Testament documents and articulated throughout the history of the Christian community's lived existence, with a thorough look at the contemporary understanding of Christian moral theology as it is articulated by the magisterium of the Catholic Church and by theologians in union with the magisterium. Students will examine these principles as they apply to some perennial moral issues.

3

Cross Listed Courses

THE 115

THE 516 The Sacraments

Presents a general theological consideration of the structure of the sacramental life of the Church and an historic-dogmatic analysis of the major theologies of the individual sacraments. Particular emphasis will be given to baptism and Eucharist. The course will include the Christian response to the sacramental life in filial, salvific social, communal, and ecclesial dimensions.

3

Prerequisites

THE 101 and THE 110

Cross Listed Courses

THE 314

THE 518 Theology of the Church and Sacraments

This course offers a historico-dogmatic analysis of the Church and the seven sacraments, from their biblical foundations to contemporary magisterial teaching. It will consider such topics as authority, liturgy, communion ecclesiology, relations between Church and state, and ecumenism. There will be particular emphasis on Baptism and Eucharist.

3

THE 601 Biblical Foundations

This course will present the basic principles of the interpretation of the Bible within the Catholic tradition. It will evaluate the strengths and difficulties of biblical criticism as it has developed in recent centuries. Alternate approaches, such as that of the early Christian fathers, will be examined. Differences in biblical interpretation among Christian denominations will be discussed. The Bible will be shown as the foundation of Christian prayer, catechetics, and family and community life.

3

THE 602 Theological Foundations

Theology will be approached as a service to the Christian people, enabling them to fully understand their faith in each successive age. Thus, emphasis will be placed on how the insights of theology can assist in individual and communal spiritual growth and in the renewal of the Church. Some philosophical background to theological study will be presented.

3

THE 603 Historical Foundations

Many of the major figures, spiritual movements, and theologies in the history of Christianity will be studied in this course. It will provide a perspective on the origins of numerous aspects of Christian faith, life, and worship; on the sources of division among Christians; and on other important topics essential to the understanding of Christianity.

3

THE 604 Teachings of Vatican II

The teachings of the Second Vatican Council constitute the modern basis for Roman Catholics' understanding of the Church and its renewal. This course examines the history and importance of ecumenical councils, the historical and theological background of the Second Vatican Council, and, most important, the meaning and application of the council's teachings in the Church today.

3

THE 605 Foundations of Moral Theology

This course will be an exploration of some foundational issues in moral theology, such as the following: the structure of the human/moral act, the meaning of moral law, the meaning of virtue, the nature of conscience, the nature and possibility of mortal sin. The course will focus on understanding the contributions of recent Magisterial statements, especially Veritatis Splendor, in the context of significant background texts and current controversies and debates about these issues.

3

THE 606 Dogmatic Theology I: Trinity, Christology, and Soteriology

This course examines the sources in Scripture, Tradition, and Magisterial teaching for the dogmas of the Triune God, the Incarnate Word, and His saving deeds.  While the primary focus will be on divine revelation and the teaching of the Church's Magisterium on these sacred mysteries some attention will be devoted to currently unresolved questions in these matters.

3

THE 607 THE 607

This course examines the sources in Scripture, Tradition, and Magisterial teaching for the dogmas on the Church and the seven Sacraments.  While the primary focus will be on divine revelation and teaching of the Church's Magisterium on these sacred mysteries some attention will be devoted to currently unresolved questions in these matters. 

3

THE 609 Church Renewal

This course consists of a study of central issues related to the renewal of the Church and Christian life today. Both the spiritual and institutional dimensions of Church renewal will be discussed. Lessons drawn from the history of renewal and reform in the Church will be applied to present movements, such as Cursillo and charismatic renewal.

3

THE 610 Theology and Ministry of the Word

This course will discuss how the Christian people are formed by the Word of God as presented in Scripture and Church Teaching. This information is the result of a sound theological understanding of the Word and its effective proclamation through preaching, teaching, prophecy, and catechesis based on the Word of God.

3

THE 630 Sin, Conversion, and Evangelization

This course will seek a theological understanding of the basic Gospel call to recognition of sin, repentance, and conversion, and pastoral approaches to enabling men and women to respond to that call today. It will explore the relationship of the Church to the world through application of the theology of evangelization presented by Pope Paul VI and the Second Vatican Council.

3

THE 641 Catechesis: Content and Curriculum

This course examines Jesus as the essential content of all catechetical endeavors. It identifies the four pillars of the Deposit of Faith-creed, liturgy and sacraments, Christian moral living, and prayer-as the basis for the Christian life. It discusses the implications of the kerygma on catechesis, i.e., emphasis on insertion into the mystery of Christ. This course considers necessary elements of any catechetical work as explicated in the Catechism of the Catholic Church and includes practice in the development of curricula for specific catechetical needs.

3

THE 645 Pastoral and Spiritual Direction

Offering direction for living the Christian life has been part of the Church's heritage from the beginning. This course will study some of the many approaches to pastoral and spiritual direction in the Church's history, from the time of the early fathers of the Church up to present-day approaches including Catholic covenant communities and third order groups. Both classical and current theological and spiritual literature will be considered, with practical pastoral applications discussed.

3

THE 650 Christian Liturgy

This is an advanced, graduate-level course examining the theological foundations of Christian liturgy, as well as pastoral approaches to planning and fostering good liturgical celebration. The course will explore the nature of worship, Jewish liturgical tradition and its influence on Christian worship, an historical understanding of Christian liturgy, and the planning of liturgical celebration.

3

THE 655 Mary in the Modern World

The course will consist of a theological investigation of the doctrines and magisterial teachings concerning the singular role of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the providential plan of salvation. This will be followed by examining the relationship between Mary and the Holy Spirit as contained in the writings of the Franciscan martyr St. Maximilian Kolbe. Lastly, there will be a theological and pastoral analysis of the Marian messages from the principal apparitions of Mary in the modern world, with special emphasis on the messages of Lourdes, Fatima, and the present reported apparitions from Medjugorje.

3

THE 660 Pastoral Issues

This course will focus on a particular topic or area of importance in pastoral theology, or practical pastoral work. Examples of possible topics are: Youth Ministry, Parish Pastoral Ministry, Pastoral Structures (Church Government), and Pastoral Guidance (Spiritual Direction), Church Law and Discipleship.

3

Notes

This course may be taken more than once on different topics.

THE 671 Introduction to Canon Law

This course will examine the nature, history, and function of Latin Church law.  The course will survey select canons of the 1983 Code of Canon Law in light of the documents of the Second Vatican Council and post-conciliar documents.  The topics to be considered will include: general norms; the People of God, including the rights and obligations of the Christian faithful, Church structures, and institutes of consecrated life and societies of apostolic life; the teaching office of the Church; the temporal goods of the Church; and, sanctions in the Church.  N.B.: Due to limitations of time, this course will not address the canonical aspects of the Church's sanctifying office or the applicable procedures for trials.

3

THE 675 Pastoral Perspectives on Marriage and Family

The course will seek out and discuss pastoral wisdom for marriage and family life from the Catholic tradition and other Christian sources. This would include the teachings on marriage and family from the great teachers of the Catholic tradition, such as St. Augustine and St. John Chrysostom. It will also include contemporary Christian wisdom related to the special situation of Christian families and married couples in the modern world, as well as consideration of the contributions of the social sciences and of modern theology to the development of a sound Christian pastoral approach to marriage and family life today.

3

THE 678 Sacramental Preparation

This course explores the sacramental life of the Church from the perspective that the hallmark of the adult Catholic life must be liturgical. We will discuss preparation for Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Reconciliation, Matrimony and Anointing of the Sick in regard to their Rites, Canon Law, pastoral practice, and the truths they express. The primary objective is to understand how to prepare people to be fully conscious of what is happening in the sacraments, actively engaged in the rites, and enriched by them.

3

THE 680 Applied Christian Ministry

Providing a broad overview of ministry positions within the Church, students are taught spirituality skills and methods for ministry using the content of their theology courses. Observations and field experiences as well as peer and practice teaching are included. Preparation and projects are focused on actual placement. This is a suggested course for those not pursuing the Graduate Specialization in Catechetics. This class is not an elective for those pursuing the Graduate Specialization in Catechetics.

3

Corequisites

It can be taken along with THE 780 and THE 641

THE 681 Catechetical Practicum

Opportunities to participate in supervised catechetical ministries such as the RCIA, parish adult programs, Catholic schools, or parish religious education are available for students to obtain teaching experience. This may be elected twice for different ministries.

3

Prerequisites

THE 691, THE 692, and THE 641

THE 691 Catechetical Methods I

This course introduces organic teaching methods that integrate the academic grasp of Christianity and Christian critical thinking with Christian witness, continuing conversion to Christ, and a call to action in the Church. Practical applications of the principles of evangelization and catechesis are practiced with continuing conversion as the goal. Stages of faith and moral development are studied to facilitate teaching the faith at all levels. Learning styles and models are examined to make them applicable to teaching the faith. Basic communication skills as they apply to the catechetical situation are used.

3

THE 692 Catechetical Methods II

This course continues the organic teaching method described above and includes the uses of liturgy, prayer, music, and Catholic literature and art in the catechetical endeavor. Examination of the culture to be evangelized and catechized is included. A major 50-minute catechetical presentation is required.

3

Prerequisites

THE 691

THE 693 The Catechumenate in the RCIA

This course studies the development of the Christian initiation process by the Fathers of the Church, highlighting their methods and the content of their catechesis. The revised Rite of Christian Initiation is studied closely, highlighting its catechetical, liturgical, and pastoral components and the initiation into the Church of adults and children.

3

Notes

This course may be taken more than once on different topics.

THE 694 Catechetical Practice Today

This course studies the needs of the Church in the United States regarding current catechetical practice. Specifically, it covers family-based catechesis, Catholic schools, religious education, PSR, adult catechesis, catechesis for conversion, catechesis and culture, and alternative structures for catechesis. The theory and elements of each type of program are examined, and practice in the development of new programs for specific needs will be provided.

3

Prerequisites

Students must have completed all other catechetics courses; may be concurrent with THE 692.

THE 700 Contemporary Moral Problems

These courses take a Catholic approach to contemporary moral issues from a theological and pastoral perspective. Issues in one or more of the following areas will be treated: social, medical, sexual, marital, and business morality.

3

Notes

This course may be taken more than once on different topics.

THE 710 Old Testament Writings

An in-depth study of a particular area, book, or theme of Old Testament literature. Examples of possible course topics include: The Pentateuch, the prophetic literature, the Psalms, covenant theology.

3

Notes

This course may be taken more than once on different topics.

THE 711 New Testament Writings

An in-depth study of a particular area, book, or theme of New Testament literature. Possible course topics include: Pauline writings, the Gospel of John, the Church in the New Testament, theology of the Holy Spirit.

3

Notes

This course may be taken more than once on different topics.

THE 721 Christian Spirituality

Christian Spirituality is the study of the nature and means of Christian holiness. This course will consider various dimensions of Christian holiness, including prayer and worship, the cross and the ascetical life, repentance, the activity of the Holy Spirit, the role of the sacraments, and the love of God in Jesus Christ, which is the center of all Christian spirituality. This course will approach these topics through the study of major spiritual writers and saints of the past and of more recent times.

3

THE 722 Fathers and Doctors of the Church

This course pursues an in-depth study of an important topic or author from either the patristic period (the era of the Fathers of the Church) or from the great Doctors of the Church, such as St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Bonaventure, St. Catherine of Siena, or St. Theresa of Avila.

3

Notes

This course may be taken more than once on different topics.

THE 730 Grace and the Virtues

This course will be a systematic exploration of the theology of grace. We will examine the various meanings and key issues involved in understanding grace as presented in Scripture, tradition, and contemporary sources. The development of an integrated theology of grace will lead to and ground a reflection on fundamental aspects of our relationship with God and our living out of the Christian life.

3

THE 731 Christology

A systematic study of the person and work of Jesus Christ will be conducted in this course. Beginning with a consideration of method, we will develop a contemporary, integrative approach to Christology, drawing on the riches of the biblical, traditional, and contemporary testimony.

3

THE 732 Sacraments

A consideration of the signs of salvation flowing from the sacrament, Christ, and his Church will be the goal of this course. The anthropological bases of these signs will be examined and utilized in the seven sacraments that will be covered in-depth.

3

THE 733 Tradition and the Development of Doctrine

This course will explore the meaning of Tradition and its relation to Sacred Scripture, touching upon such issues as the material sufficiency of sacred Scripture and its relation to the Reformation doctrine sola scriptura. The monuments of Tradition are studied with a view to recognizing the complementarity between Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. The study of Tradition readily leads to an exposition of the development of doctrine within the Catholic Church. The course investigates such development beginning with Cardinal John Newman's text, An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, wherein the development of doctrine answers the questions of how the Catholic Church's teaching extended into every generation after the close of the Apostolic Age. The study of the development of doctrine follows various authors from Newman to the present day.

3

THE 740 Theological Issues

This course will select a topic of theological interest for careful study. Possible topics include: recent papal teachings, ecumenism, Catholic apologetics, theology of renewal, the Church and the Holy Spirit, etc.

3

Notes

This course may be taken more than once on different topics.

THE 780 Scripture, the Heart of Catechesis

This course introduces revelation as the teaching technique of God the Father and examines the content and method of Jesus' teaching. The apostles' teaching styles, the content of their catechesis, and their use of Scripture are covered as well. The scriptural basis of the catechesis of the Fathers of the Church is included. The course also explores implementation of Bible studies and liturgies of the Word for evangelical and catechetical purposes and provides practice in biblical narrative and teaching from Scripture.

3

THE 804 Philosophical Foundations of Catechesis

This course explores the sound philosophical presuppositions and reasoning of Christian teaching. Catechesis is a cogent presentation of the truth, which finds its fullest expression in God's revelation in Jesus Christ. However, a philosophical discussion and analysis of truth helps lead thinking people today to consider the sense and veracity of the message of Christ and his Church.

3

THE 895 Thesis

The Master's Thesis is an approximately 50-75-page research paper that advances, even if modestly, the study of the Bible or of historical, systematic, or moral theology. It will be written under the direction of a faculty advisor and formally defended before the advisor and two other members of the faculty of theology.

3

THE 999 Thesis Extension

Registration for this optional non-credited course indicates that the student is involved in studies necessary for the completion of the thesis. At the end of each extension period the student must demonstrate progress toward the completion of the thesis. Master's students are allowed to register for THE 999 no more than two (2) times. A matriculation fee is required. This fee entitles the student to the use of the library and other basic services.

No credit